Touching Humanity in Need of Kindness (THINK)

Mission: THINK exists to demonstrate genuine "kindness" to the poor in Liberia, especially women and children, by providing services and programs that would empower them to transform their lives, become self-sustainable citizens who will contribute to their communities.
Dec 29, 2015

Progress Report

  • 25 adolescent girls and young women and 10 under-five children of the girls (5 girls and 5 boys) entered THINK Home for Cycle 12 on November 8, 2015
  • Christmas Program and party for children in the ELWA Jangaba Road Community held by THINK
  • Follow up visits made on 37 children affected by Ebola that participated in the retreat sessions. The kids are still in need of assistance for getting into school.
  • 2,500 children affected by Ebola and other vulnerable children in four counties (Grand Cape Mount, Montserrado, Margibi and Bong )
  • THINK Safe Home provided services to 11 survivors of sexual violence and the THINK Juvenile Transit Center to provided shelter and services to 15 children that came in contact or conflict with the law from October 1, 2015 until December 15, 2015 (Quarter – 4).
  • Clinical management and treatment provided for 120 children at the three One Stop Centers for Sexual Violence supervised by THINK
Cycle 12
Cycle 12

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Oct 30, 2015

Surviving Ebola is like rebirth.

Surviving Ebola is like rebirth. Survivors of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) returned to empty homes because most of what they owned including household and personal items are lost during the attempt to contain the spread of the virus. 

When diagnosed with Ebola and removed to the Ebola Treatment Units, your household items are sprayed with chlorine and the majority (if not all) burned to avoid the contamination of more people. Most of the items lost during such exercises are household materials and personal items including beddings, mattresses, clothes, documents, goods for trading at the markets, and any other items found in their homes by the sanitation and chlorination teams. 

Neglected and stigmatized by community members and sometimes by their  families, sur-vivors of Ebola returning from the ETUs are left all alone to start their lives over, having nothing.

UNFPA in collaboration with THINK being cognizant of these issues  brought a sigh of relief and joy to about 1000 female survivors of EVD, SGBV and Ebola widows (15 years old and above) from six counties; Grand Cape Mount, Bomi, Montserrado, Margibi, Nimba and Lofa through the distribution of dignity kits. With funding from the Embassy of Sweden, UNFPA purchased and distributed about 1000 Dignity Kits to survivors. Each Dignity Kits comprised of one double-bed mattress, bed sheet, under clothes, bath soap, body lotion, laundry soap, toiletries, sanitary napkins, lappas, and T-shirts.

THINK and UNFPA worked with survivors and widows in the six counties to ascertain the effect of Ebola on their lives post Ebola. UNFPA is keen on following up on the health and reintegration chal-lenges faced by women who survived Ebola; especially their psychosocial and reproductive health needs, so as to design programs of responses that are adequate. 

Oct 30, 2015

Widows Speak Out

“I live in Voinjama, Lofa County.  I am a professional nurse. I came in contact with the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in July 2014 when my husband came home from work one day feeling sick. He showed some symptoms of Malaria.” 

This is the account of a 40-year old woman named (M.K.D.)
She and others are being identified by their initials in order to protect their identities. 

M.K.D.’s source of transmission is not unique to her alone. At least two other female survivors, including  43 year old B.T. and 37 year old B.K., have similar source, too.

M.K.D., a professional  nurse, took her husband to the hospital and had his lab tests done. He was given treatment for Malaria and Typhoid. But M.K.D’s husband’s condition did not improve. 

“I started getting worried. I asked him if he had come in contact with anyone, who had Ebola. He denied. After the treatment at the hospital, his condition did not improve. He got so weak. I decided to hang a bag of IV solution on him so that he would gain some energy,” she said. “In the process of starting the IV line, his blood flashed all over my arm. I washed it with soap and chlorine solution after I had com-pleted hanging the drip. That is how I got infected with the Ebola virus.”

Sadly, her husband died two days later at the Foya Ebola Treatment Unit (ETU). After his death, M.K.D. became sick and was diagnosed with Ebola. “I survived because I reported myself early to the ETU”, she said.

Unlike the other two survi-vors, 37-year old (B.K.), from the New Georgia Community in Monrovia, was two-months pregnant when she contracted the virus from her late husband. At least three of her seven children, also got the virus from their father. She and her children survived the disease. They were released from the ETU with certificates on September 30, 2014. 

B.K. later gave birth to her eighth child (a boy) on May 12, 2015, at the St. Joseph’s Catholic Hospital in Monrovia. “I am happy that my baby and I survived the bad sickness", she said.

B.K. like 43-year-old B.T., face common challenges of nearly all the female survivors. Their landlords have asked them to leave their rented houses. House owners ignorantly fear that as survivors, they could likely spread the disease further to others in their homes.

With no husbands to put bread on the table, and no financial security, they are worried that they and their children would be thrown out into the streets.

As for B.T., she has 12 children for which to care for. Six of the kids are her own biological children while four are from a mate. The other two are children of a relative.

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