Jan 8, 2018

Meet Saif, a 12-year-old securing his future through books

Saif is a 12-year-old boy who lives in Pakistan's second-biggest city, Lahore. Three years ago, he was spending his days binding school textbooks and workbooks, something children in Pakistan get excited about before the start of every new school term. Unfortunately, Saif wouldn't get to read these books. He was doing this to make some much-needed cash to help his father who was struggling to support Saif's sister and three brothers on his uncertain earnings of barely a $100 a month as a labourer.

Our field team was lucky to find Saif and told him and his family about Paid to Learn, our accelrated primary school program for working children like him. They agreed to enroll him and today, after two years of hard work, Saif is a regular student at the Knowledge Inn School System, a private school near his house where he is shining in the 6th grade.

His passion for books and quest for knowledge meant he graduated at the top of his class after two years in our non-formal primary education program. This meant he qualified for our secondary school sponsorship program, through which he got placed in a mainstream private school where he continues to flourish in his studies.

Saif feels good about the fact that he is able to work and support his family alongside his studies. He wants to grow up to be a doctor so that he can treat the poor for free, showing he has an impressive commitment to service at a tender age. He is thankful to the trust's donors like yourself because of whom he is able to study in school. Please continue to support the education of budding superstars like Saif by donating to and spreading the word about this Paid to Learn program.

At work - book binding
At work - book binding

Links:

Dec 11, 2017

Exploring healthier menu ideas for School Meals in Pakistan

Breakfast Picture of Nomber.jpg
Breakfast Picture of Nomber.jpg

Last time we told you about expanding our free school breakfast program to 200 more children at Khatoon-e-Pakistan Government Girls School. This time we bring you updates exclusively from that school. In the last quarter, fruits and vegetables were added in different dishes served to students in an attempt to get students to develop healthier eating habits. Fresh fruit with natural yoghurt was a new item added to the breakfast for students and enjoyed by them. Whole wheat flour roti (flatbread) was prepared for 200 students thrice a week with spinach omelette, potato cutlets and stir-fried vegetables being rotated each day. Pulses were added to the menu since they are a rich source of protein and also familiar to the students being a staple at the dinner table at home for most of them.


The school management and the breakfast team re-assessed the breakfast menu for the winter with the goal being that we should ensure that every breakfast meal served to the students should be full of nutrition along with being healthy, delicious and efficient to prepare and serve. At the beginning of November, when the first of the cold Quetta winds arrived to Karachi, our team decided to add a new dish in the menu called Upma. It has a deep tradition in the sub-continent and is made from suji (semolina) and yogurt which are blended together with egg. Some vegetables were also added to make it more nutritional.

 

The students were not very keen on this new item on day one but as their teachers coached them about the nutritional value of an upma and encouraged them to give it a chnce, they started developing a taste for it and even demanding it for breakfast! This shows how much of an influence role models have on students and demonstrates that teachers and parents can play a positive role in shaping children's attitudes towards food preferences. This was an exciting realisation for the team and all of us are now even more motivated to explore variations of healthy meals to be added to the school meals program.


It has also been observed that students across the school have not been in a habit to eat a complete breakfast and thus skip what we think is the most important meal of the day. Teachers have to often force students to complete their
breakfast in the breakfast room. Keeping this in mind, the health teacher organized interactive morning assembly presentations conducted by students of multiple grades. Older students presented the importance of breakfast through entertaining skits. Younger students from primary classes talked about the nutritional values of different vegetables, pulses, fruits and dry fruits. The audience was also asked questions to ensure that they were actively listening and thinking about those benefits.

 

Please continue to support this program and share any ideas you may have for affordable, local and healthy menu options as we establish this program to fuel the brains that will shape Pakistan's future!


Author Name: Anam Palla, School Project Manager


Link: Zindagi Trust homepage

Breakfast Picture of November (1).jpg
Breakfast Picture of November (1).jpg
Breakfast Picture of November(2).jpg
Breakfast Picture of November(2).jpg
Breakfast Report of November(3).jpg
Breakfast Report of November(3).jpg
Oct 30, 2017

Determined to Succeed- Sardar's journey from Afghanistan to a classroom in Pakistan

Sardar picking garbage in the fruit market
Sardar picking garbage in the fruit market

Most of us are born in privileged households where our parents provide us with a comfortable living and send us to schools because that is the basic right of every child. We take it for-granted because we see that all the kids around us are doing the same thing. We even sometimes resent the hard life where we have to carry our bag full of books and copies and stay away from all the good things in life like cartoons and video games.

Sardar’s story is a little different. He was not born in a privileged household and school education wasn’t something that everyone around him was getting. Three years back, Sardar’s parents migrated from Afghanistan and settled in the city of Rawalpindi in Pakistan. They came to Pakistan in the hope of a better future but things played out a little differently when Sardar’s dad fell ill. His illness grew pretty severe causing him to become incapable of work. The responsibility to earn a living fell on the shoulders of all the six sons while the three daughters took care of the home. Two of the brothers set up a tea stall at the bus stop trying to get the passengers to buy their tea. The other four had to set up a similar stall in the nearby fruit and vegetable market, but Sardar resisted. He always had a dream to go to school and was ready to stand up against his family to fight for his right to education. At the age of 11 Sardar took a stand for himself and stood up to convince his brothers. The family finally agreed and exempted Sardar from the tea stall for a few hours in the morning.

Sardar started his education in the nearby Government School for Boys but there were more challenges awaiting him. The government passed an order to convert Sardar’s school into a girls only campus, and shift all the boys enrolled to another campus which was much further away. The long distance causing elongated commute time made it impossible for Sardar to continue his education. He discontinued his studies and joined his brothers in the fruit and vegetable market. The brothers didn’t want him at the stall anymore and so Sardar had to become a garbage collector in the same market. He would work all day in the market and think about all his class fellows and teachers. He really missed his school and dreamed of going back there one day.

Our Zindagi Trust Program Officer found out about Sardar during our enrollment drive. Sardar got enrolled in Zindagi Trust Fauiji Colony School in Rawalpindi and has now completed one year with the school. He is currently in Grade 3 and is a self-motivated learner. After school hours he still goes back to the fruit market as a garbage collector because he takes pride in the contribution he makes to his family’s income.

Talking to our field officer Sardar says:

“Previously I hated my job. I felt like I am living in garbage and wasting my life in garbage. But now that I go to school, I don’t hate it anymore. It’s like Math practice now. I count the things I pick, I add them, I multiply them. It doesn’t feel bad anymore

Hundreds of children like Sardar give up their dreams of getting a classroom education because of unfortunate circumstances. Please donate to Zindagi Trust to help us give these children a better and a brighter future through education. 

Engaged in school work
Engaged in school work
Sardar enjoying his Math class
Sardar enjoying his Math class
 
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