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Dec 27, 2018

Reflections on Afghanistan in 2018

2018 has been a transformative year for us at Aid Afghanistan for Education. Our renewed partnership with the Ministry of Education gives us hope for an Afghanistan where every woman and girl—no matter her age, marital or refugee status, or income level—can access the education of her dreams. The King Sejong Literacy Prize from UNESCO elevated our work to a global audience. And we’re proud to say that more people than ever have committed to a monthly donation supporting our students, becoming our strongest partners for peace.

2018 was also a big year for peace in Afghanistan. This may sound surprising if you watch news coverage of the war. But I invite you to think back to the spring.

Think of the first-ever ceasefire between the Afghan government and extremist groups—a ceasefire demanded by the Afghan people to celebrate Eid in peace.

Think of the Kandahar peace march. Activists from Kandahar, in southern Afghanistan, marched on foot to Kabul in the name of peace, picking up hundreds of people along the way.

Think of the parliamentary elections in the fall. While security and preparedness issues meant hundreds of polling places did not even open, a record number of women turned out to vote. Women from all backgrounds across the country, including AAE students and graduates, showed up on election day to do their part, despite the risk. Their commitment to democracy told the world loud and clear: Afghan women’s voices matter, and the world must listen.

And now think of graduation. A pivotal point in any person’s life, the chance to take on new opportunities. This year, hundreds Afghan women graduated with state-certified diplomas from Aid Afghanistan for Education’s accelerated education program. That means hundreds more women are out in the world creating peace.

We believe our students’ resilience and ambition prove that education is worth the investment. Educated women raise healthy and education children, vote in elections, start businesses to support their families and communities, pursue higher education, and forge paths to peace in a world in desperate need of it. They become journalists, midwives, teachers, mothers, accountants, scientists, and more. With education, Afghan women are achieving their wildest dreams.

To our students, to our teachers, to our advocates and allies, to our supporters like you: thank you. Thank you for making 2018 our most hopeful year for peace yet.

Oct 13, 2018

Literacy Day celebrations in Afghanistan

Hassina Sherjan receiving the award in Paris
Hassina Sherjan receiving the award in Paris

The Aid Afghanistan for Education team recently celebrated International Literacy Day with a very special surprise: We were selected to win UNESCO’s King Sejong Literacy Prize!

This prestigious award is given to only two nonprofits every year that place a high emphasis on mother tongue literacy. Hassina Sherjan, our founder and director, traveled to Paris to accept the award from UNESCO. We’re proud to be the first Afghan organization to ever win this prize. You can read more about the award on UNESCO’s website.

Literacy is a major key to unlocking your potential. When a woman can read and write, she can build financial and social independence, help her children learn how to read, and achieve her educational goals. For women in Afghanistan and all throughout the world, literacy is the first step in chasing your dreams.

Not long after International Literacy Day, the Afghanistan Center at Kabul University delivered a wonderful gift: books for our schools’ libraries! We’re very grateful for their support, and know that students will enjoy new books to read. Here are some pictures of the book delivery.

We are also excited to share that GlobalGiving’s Safer World Fund is matching all donations to Aid Afghanistan for Education to help us create a more peaceful Afghanistan. With the end of the year holidays approaching, remember there is no better gift than the gift of education.

Thank you, as always, for your steadfastness in supporting education for women and girls in Afghanistan.

New books from Kabul University!
New books from Kabul University!
Hassina w/ UNESCO director-general, Audrey Azoulay
Hassina w/ UNESCO director-general, Audrey Azoulay
King Sejong Literacy Prize
King Sejong Literacy Prize
Jul 30, 2018

The future of accelerated education in Afghanistan

Surrounded by men, a student in a burqa graduates.
Surrounded by men, a student in a burqa graduates.

Hello dear friends,

Warm greetings from Kabul! We have an update we’re very excited to share with you about our partnership with the Ministry of Education.

We’ve had a partnership with the Ministry for a long time now—enabling us to be the first NGO in Afghanistan to issue state-certified high school diplomas. Now, we are part of the first Public-Private Partnership that the Ministry of Education has signed with a civil society organization. AAE’s accelerated education program for marginalized girls and women will be integrated within the Ministry of Education’s programs and we—the AAE team—will be managing the program and mobilizing students for the expansion of the program. Together, we plan to reach 12,000 students in 14 additional provinces within the next five years.

AAE’s accelerated learning program is a model to be used for how NGOs can support local governments to deliver better services to the people. We’re proud to be part of the movement in the NGO world to develop long-term, sustainable programs to improve communities holistically—not short, project-based activities that come and go. Education is a lifetime investment in a person, a family, a community, and a country, so NGOs, governments, and other stakeholders must be committed for the long-term.

Thank you for joining us on this journey to make sure that everyone in Afghanistan—regardless of refugee status, marital status, or age—can get the education they deserve.

A mother brings her child to school with her.
A mother brings her child to school with her.
 
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