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Apr 2, 2017

PASSING IT ON

New bicycle for the girls in H. secondary school
New bicycle for the girls in H. secondary school

Two of the girls have taken their final school year exam. The main aim of the Girl’s Education Project is to get girls through the final year of schooling. The Bicycle Project is a supplementary project of the Education Project. Hence, the two bicycles will be passed on to the girls reaching to higher secondary school if their school is far to walk.

Our record shows that eleven girls from the Education Project are in grade eighth that means the eleven girls will go to higher secondary from 15th of April 2017. Classes in the new year usually start from 21st of April. So basically, we need further bicycles in less four-week time.

Binita, Janki, Ramita, Ranjita, Lilam, Murti, Manisha, Sandhiya, Ahuliya, Nitu and Sunita are the girls will start their secondary schooling in this April. All the girls are from the poorest of the poor and Dalit families, therefore they will depend on us to provide a bicycle so that they can go to school regularly.

Currently, one-hundred and one girl are receiving our support through the Education Project and, we aim to provide a bicycle to twenty-one girls in total. But so far, we have been able to provide only ten bicycles. Hence, we need eleven more bicycles.

A bicycle costs only $90 in Nepal. If you can afford to spare cost to a bicycle, then please support us to support the girls. We appreciate your generosity. More information about the Girls’ Education Project at -

https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/girls-education-in-nepal/

Links:

Jan 29, 2017

Pat and Niamh in Nepal

Photo from the workshop
Photo from the workshop

Pat, the ambassador of Nepal Village Foundation, visited Nepal with her ex-pupil, Niamh. Niamh is only seventeen and Pat is a retired art teacher. They spent three weeks to inspect the project and, to motivate the girls to do better in their class. For this, we organised four workshops to meet all the 101 girls in the scheme. We began the workshop with a drawing and then played a word formation game followed by a question and answer session.

The drawing: As soon as the girls got a colouring pack, they began to draw their favourite animal, flower or art. Despite the language barrier, they drew brilliantly. The girls were treated with a toffee for their brilliant work. Drawing is not a usual activity in the local schools, but almost every household have a couple of flowers painted on their front wall as a decoration. The drawing activity worked well to eliminate much of the hesitation and, it enabled us to engage better with each other.  

The word formation game: After the drawing, we started with a word formation game. English is the weakest subject for most pupils in the local schools. Therefore, many of the girls struggled to form English words. So, we put a volunteer in each group to support the girls that helped to accelerate the game. The main purpose of the game was to teach some English words to the girls, and it did work okay.  

The question and answer: To find out about each other and about the cultures, we began with asking questions. Frequently asked questions from the girls were; what you eat in England? Do you have children? How old are you? What is your favourite colour? Do you like our village? How long will you stay in our village? Will you come back again?

By the end of these all, the girls became friendly with Pat and Niamh and, they found very difficult to leave the village. This was the first time, we spent lots time with the girls, and it truly worth doing it. Many girls from the poor families want to be a nurse and teacher. We delivered a very clear message to convince the girls that we are with you and, with you all the way. We are here to support you in whatever way we can. We also briefed them about the way everything works in the organisation and, if help is needed how and who to approach.

Niamh also mentioned to the girls that an education could open many doors for you to do whatever you want to. Girls in the community do not have a similar freedom as of boys. Overall, Pat and Niamh’s visit to the project was very productive, and it created a ‘yes we can’ environment for girls in the community. A similar visit by many other well-wishers, time to time will keep the girls motivated. It will also promote cross-culture learning.

Fundraising: 101 girls from the poorest and Dalit families are in the scheme which costing £5050 annually and, still £980 is needed to keep the girls in school for the year. If you can afford then, please sponsor a girl today. It costs only £50 to keep a girl in school for a whole year, providing uniform, study materials, school fees and support.


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Dec 19, 2016

The girls are paddling to School

Beneficiary of the project
Beneficiary of the project

Seven girls (Nabisha, Kamala and Gita) out of the twenty-one have received a bicycle. Now, the girls are paddling off to school regularly, on time and with a smile on face. The girls were walking ten to fifteen kilometres each day to attend their school. It was not safe, and they were often late to their class. Kamala was full of tears but the tears of joy when she received the bicycle. No one in Kamala family ever owns a bicycle because they are very poor and can’t afford it. She used to sit and stares when others ride a bicycle with a hope that one day she will too. We taught her to ride the bicycle.

We have identified twenty-one girls are in most need of a bicycle, seven have already received, and so far, funding for fifteen bicycles have received. This includes offline fundraising too. In the next round, we are planning to provide a bicycle to all the reaming girls. To make it happen- funding for five more bicycles is needed. It can be purchased as a gift in the name of someone you care. Thank you for your support in advance. 

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year

Beneficiary of the project
Beneficiary of the project

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