Aug 14, 2015

One On One Help for the Poorest

Peter with 2 of his children
Peter with 2 of his children

Peter Kaindi is a single parent of 8 children. He tries to support his family by doing day labor odd jobs. He earns about $1.50 per day. His wife died from cancer. All nine family members live in the 2 rooms of a crude mud brick house with dirt floor and no latrine. Five of the children are school-age but three of them have dropped out because their father has not been able to afford the fees and uniforms. A generous GHP donor has offered to pay for a monthly food ration to help keep this family from going hungry and is also covering the school expenses so that the children can attend school. The same donor has decided to cover the monthly food ration for another family, a grandmother caring for her two orphaned grandchildren. These two families now bring the total to 24 families enrolled in the Global Health Partnerships (GHP) program of feeding the poorest.

In the three months (May through July 2015) since the last report the GHP outreach clinics provided screening and medical care, including immunizations and assessment for malnutrition for 225 children. Four children were treated for moderate or severe malnutrition.

The “Feed Hungry Children in Kenya” project provides relief from hunger and child malnutrition very effectively and efficiently. 100% of the donations that are received by GHP go directly into program services! (A GHP Board member is covering all GHP administrative expenses).

Any comments or suggestions that you might have about our program would be greatly appreciated. What do you consider most interesting? What changes would you like to see?

Children in front of their home
Children in front of their home
May 19, 2015

Feeding hungry children in remote villages-Part 2

Doris with her mother
Doris with her mother

     Doris is an 11 month old girl (shown in photo with her mother) who was brought to an outreach clinic funded by Global Health Partnerships (GHP). Her mother said that Doris was ill with a cough and diarrhea. She appeared thin and wasted when I examined her with the Kenya nurse, and her weight and length measurements confirmed that she was suffering from severe malnutrition. She was started immediately on the ready-to-use therapeutic food supplement Plumpy’nut® in addition to antibiotics and deworming medicine, with follow-up arranged with the community health worker (CHW) for her village. During the assessment of Doris’ illness, her mother mentioned that she had brought her to a clinic about two months ago, where she was started on treatment for malnutrition. But the clinic was far from her home and she could not afford the transportation costs for the recommended return visits. Without ongoing treatment, Doris’ condition deteriorated to the point of life-threatening severe malnutrition. Fortunately the GHP outreach clinic brought services closer to her home. The CHW will check on her and give her mother a supply of Plumpy’nut every 2 weeks, and monitor her progress. This GHP community-based approach has successfully treated over 250 children with acute malnutrition.

     In order to prevent death and disability from severe malnutrition, it is very important to provide the necessary therapeutic feeding for the poorest families who are most at risk. They often live far from health care facilities and they are not able to afford the transportation costs.  The outreach clinics, as described in the previous report, brings the services of the “Feed Hungry Children in Kenya” therapeutic feeding program to the families most in need. In the 3 months covered by this report an additional eight young children have been treated for malnutrition. The outreach clinics provided care, including immunizations, and assessment for malnutrition, for 254 children during those 3 months (February –April 20115).

     Some of the poorest families with a malnourished child, often a grandmother caring for AIDS orphans, have other hungry children in their household. Those families receive a monthly food ration in addition to the Plumpy’nut.  There are now has 22 families who receive food ration and some clothing for the children.

The “Feed Hungry Children in Kenya” project provides relief from hunger and child malnutrition very effectively and efficiently. 100% of the donations that are received by GHP go directly into program services! (A GHP Board member is covering all GHP administrative expenses).

Please send us your comments, questions, and feedback about our program. What do you find most interesting or important, and what changes would you suggest?

Assessing nutrition status in outreach clinic
Assessing nutrition status in outreach clinic
Feb 20, 2015

Finding and feeding hungry children in villages

Assessing a child for malnutrition
Assessing a child for malnutrition

Severe malnutrition is frequently fatal for young children (30-50% mortality) in the absence of a good care in a therapeutic feeding program. For that reason it is very important to find and treat the children suffering from acute malnutrition, though this can be a challenging task. The families that live in the rural region of southeastern Kenya where this project is located reside in villages that are widely dispersed. Extreme poverty and lack of transportation limit access to health care for the poorest families, and food insecurity increases the risk of malnutrition for their children. The nurses who work with the Global Health Partnerships (GHP) project travel to these isolated villages to conduct outreach clinics, which are coordinated by local volunteer community health workers (CHWs). The children are weighed and measured to assess their nutritional status, and immunizations are also given. The children who are found to have the more severe problems with malnutrition are enrolled in the “Feed Hungry Children in Kenya” therapeutic feeding program. In the 3 months covered by this report, 334 children under 5 years of age were provided care in the outreach clinics and assessed for malnutrition. Five of the children had severe or moderately severe malnutrition and were provided with a supply of the ready-to-use therapeutic food supplements (Plumpy’nut® or Plumpy’sup®) every 2 weeks, and growth monitoring by the CHWs. Children also received deworming treatment and vitamin A supplements as recommended for poorly nourished populations of children. The results of this therapeutic feeding program have been very good, with the majority of children fully recovered and with a mortality rate of less than 1%. The cost of each outreach clinic is only $80.

In addition to the therapeutic feeding of children with malnutrition, the project now has 21 families who receive a monthly food ration and clothing for the children from Global Health Partnerships (GHP). These families are among the poorest in Africa, and include children with malnutrition or who lost their parents from AIDS, subsistence farmers who lost their crops from drought, and children whose mother died in childbirth.

The “Feed Hungry Children in Kenya” project provides relief from the hunger and child malnutrition very effectively and efficiently. As of July 1, 2014, 100% of the donations that are received by GHP go directly into program services! (A GHP Board member is covering all GHP administrative expenses).

We would like to hear your thoughts and feedback us about our program. What do you find most valuable, and what changes would you like to see implemented?

 
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