Nov 7, 2013

SOIL's Emergency Toilets Continue to Provide a Critical Service

Toilet drum collection
Toilet drum collection

Following the 2010 earthquake, SOIL built emergency ecological sanitation (EcoSan) toilets in camps throughout Port-au-Prince, providing sanitation services for thousands of people displaced by the earthquake. Nearly three years after the earthquake, and in face of one of the largest and most virulent cholera outbreaks in recent global history, many of SOIL's emergency toilets remain in operation and continue to provide a crucial service to people still living in urban camps. For many of these people, a toilet can mean the difference between life and death, between the return of cholera and the possibility of health.

Thanks to your support, SOIL has been able to maintain these emergency sanitation services for over 3,500 people still living in Haiti’s most vulnerable communities. And because all the wastes from these specially-designed EcoSan toilets were collected and safely treated through the simple ecological process of thermophilic composting, SOIL produced thousands of gallons of EcoSan compost as a result. This rich, organic compost will be used to rebuild Haiti’s fragile soil.

Long after most other NGOs have shut down their emergency sanitation programs, the SOIL emergency toilets remain operational and well maintained at the extremely low cost of less than $2.50 per person per month. Our paid toilet managers help to bring a valued service to their communities, while simultaneously representing the possibility of hope, of employment, and of health. Although the emergency sanitation program is ultimately meant to be temporary, its maintenance has several long-term implications, including increased knowledge, understanding, and acceptance of EcoSan technology, healthier lives for the people utilizing SOIL's environmentally-conscious toilets, and increased employment potential for people trained as toilet managers.

Over the coming year, SOIL will work to keep these toilets open as we find it unconscionable to close down our emergency toilets until viable alternative programs have been identified and implemented. And we will also scale up our activities to design and test a social business model for affordably and sustainably providing ecological sanitation services throughout Haiti.

We sincerely thank you for support of this important effort, and we hope that you will stay connected with our progress throughout the coming year.

Filling clean empty drums with cover material
Filling clean empty drums with cover material
Leading an EcoSan education class at the SOIL farm
Leading an EcoSan education class at the SOIL farm
Aug 21, 2013

Public Health Heroes: Haitian Perspectives

Magdalia Rosambert, SOIL Public Toilet Manager
Magdalia Rosambert, SOIL Public Toilet Manager

SOIL’s emergency public toilets in Haiti are kept open, operational, and clean by a team of 38 paid public toilet managers. Nowhere else in the world do public toilets stay clean and open to the public without cost, and Haiti is no exception. SOIL’s public toilet managers play a critical role in ensuring clean, dignified sanitation access for the thousands of people living in the Port-au-Prince tent camps serviced through SOIL’s emergency sanitation program. Many of the camp committees (the community-based governing organizations within displacement camps) work with SOIL to spread these few employment positions to as many vulnerable individuals and families as possible. Since the earthquake, SOIL's emergency sanitation program overall has provided short-term employment for more than 350 individuals.

Why do we feel that our toilet managers are heroes?

Because the only way to stop Haiti's sanitation crisis and deadly cholera epidemic is through provision of sanitation services, and SOIL’s emergency sanitation program is a crucial part of this struggle. Our public toilet managers work hard to ensure that our toilets are kept open, clean, and well-functioning. Long after most other organizations have shut down their emergency sanitation programs, the SOIL emergency toilets remain operational and well maintained thanks to our manager's tireless commitment.

Haitian perspectives on sanitation: 

The following was written by Herby Sanon, SOIL's Sanitation Supervisor in Port-au-Prince, and translated from Haitian Creole into English. Herby interviewed several of SOIL's toilet managers to offer their unique perspective on SOIL's work within the context of a major sanitation crisis in Haiti.

"My friend Frantz François works in Cite Soleil and he never stops engaging in his work. For him, SOIL offers salvation and is a guiding light for people who used to go to the bathroom in the brook near where he lives. Frantz has seen a change within 90% of the population in Cite Soleil and he says that he won’t stop working with SOIL until all of Cite Soleil has been improved.

Marie-Mineuve, who manages two toilets for SOIL since 2010, didn’t want to miss the chance to give her impression of SOIL. She considers SOIL more than a blessing that fell from the heavens. She was in despair and SOIL changed her life and her family’s life. Without SOIL, she would have left the camp where she was staying. While everyone else was leaving the camp, she said that she stayed to work with SOIL and that she will always work with us not only because it is an employment opportunity but because of all that SOIL is doing for the country of Haiti. 

My voice joins all of the others in saying: ‘SOIL, thank you so much for making this huge chain of transformation in everyday life after the earthquake of January 12 2010. Our dream is to see SOIL cover the whole country of Haiti. I feel that I do not have the words to explain how much SOIL does and what the organization brings to my life.’

--Herby Sanon, SOIL Sanitation Supervisor

As you can see from this piece, SOIL’s public toilet managers help to bring a valued service to their communities, while simultaneously representing the possibility of hope, of employment, and of health. Although the emergency sanitation program is ultimately meant to be temporary, its maintenance has several long-term implications: increased knowledge, understanding, and acceptance of EcoSan technology, healthier lives for the people utilizing SOIL's environmentally conscious toilets, and increased employment potential for people trained as toilet managers and operators.

From all of us at SOIL:

Together we believe we can make Frantz Francois’s dream come true for all of Haiti: we will not give up until everyone in the country has access to dignified, life-saving sanitation. Mesi anpil (thank you so much) to all of our supporters who make this very important work possible. 

With love from Haiti,

SOIL

Tony "Bos Tony" Sinius, SOIL PUblic Toilet Manager
Tony "Bos Tony" Sinius, SOIL PUblic Toilet Manager
Midi Ydermond, SOIL Public Toilet Manager
Midi Ydermond, SOIL Public Toilet Manager
SOIL's EcoSan compost - "Konpos Lakay"
SOIL's EcoSan compost - "Konpos Lakay"

Links:

May 22, 2013

Replace the Poopmobile

The SOIL Poopmobile
The SOIL Poopmobile

Twice a week a large colorfully painted truck rumbles out of the SOIL office gate to drive through the capital city collecting waste from SOIL's EcoSan toilets. More than 5,000 people living in tent cities around Port-au-Prince currently depend on the SOIL "Poopmobile" to pick up their full toilet drums and deliver them to the SOIL compost site for safe treatment and transformation into rich, organic compost. Sadly, after 3 years of faithful service, the Poopmobile has broken down beyond the point of repair, and we're now working to raise money for a replacement Poopmobile II. 

Over the past two days we've received an overwhelming outpouring of support from around the world, and we're now over halfway towards our goal replacing the Poopmobile. Learn more at http://www.oursoil.org/save-the-poopmobile/

Thank you to everyone who has joined us on the campaign to replace the Poopmobile! 

Environmental messaging - change begins with me!
Environmental messaging - change begins with me!
Unloading the Poopmobile
Unloading the Poopmobile

Links:

 
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