Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia

by Wildlife Messengers
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Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia
Raising awareness on wildlife trade in Indonesia

Project Report | Feb 27, 2023
Awareness raising in Seram and Ambon | 2023 March

By Dudi Nandika and Dwi Agustina | Directors, Konservasi Kakatua Indonesia

Mr Nandika giving a talk at Pattimura University
Mr Nandika giving a talk at Pattimura University

Poaching wildlife in Maluku, especially in the islands of Seram and Ambon, is still an ongoing issue. In addition to the high market demand, hunting in Maluku also occurs due to the existence of a hunting culture that still continues today as customary demands of indigenous people. Hunting for commercial purposes is actually contrary to the beliefs of indigenous people on Seram Island because hunting is considered "Pamali" (prohibited for the purpose of personal enrichment). However, cultural shifts create new ways to get money, leading to shifts and violations of cultural norms.

The hunted wildlife species mostly (84%) include birds (of which 96% are parrots and 4% other species), crustaceans (11%), reptiles (3%), and primates (2%). In general, indigenous people in Seram and Ambon islands hunt wild animals to fulfil their daily protein consumption. They utilize more than 50% of wildlife species, especially mammals, birds, and in smaller quantities reptiles and fish. Based on several studies, their favourite wildlife species are cuscus (49%), Celebes wild boar (21%), Timor deer (17%), flying foxes (1%), wild birds (6%), freshwater prawn (2%), and others (4%).

To prevent this, we have been conducting a campaign that involves relevant stakeholders on location. To change attitudes and break the habit of hunting threatened wildlife, we are advising students as the new generation, who need coaching to understand conservation and become pride of their local wildlife. We also advise them on alternative livelihoods without over-exploiting and destroying their wildlife.       

So far, our awareness campaign involved 25 biology students from the Pattimura University, Ambon. The biology students are currently our target audience, as their knowledge can spread wider about conservation issues in their surrounding environment. We also conducted another awareness campaign in Dusun Lamerang, Wokam Island of the Aru Archipelago, which is a potential location for a reintroduction project. This campaign focused on the young generation and staff of Wokam village and was attended by 18 persons from the community. We are also spreading other campaign media like stickers, posters, and masks.

Our awareness program will continue, but it should be done in an ongoing basis. If this program only visits a community once, the opportunity that the people will change awareness and engage in conservation action is much smaller. In addition, the awareness campaign should be followed up by direct conservation actions involving local stakeholders. Such structural awareness program can result in a much longer lasting benefit to the community and their wildlife.

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Organization Information

Wildlife Messengers

Location: Richmond, VA - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @wildlifemess
Project Leader:
George Olah
Budapest , Budapest Hungary
$1,598 raised of $5,000 goal
 
65 donations
$3,402 to go
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