Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area

by Washington Area Women's Foundation
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
Invest in Women in the Washington DC Metro Area
#AskHer Flier
#AskHer Flier
We hosted The Women's Foundation's #AskHer "Caring for Nonprofit Leaders of Color"  with C. Marie Taylor, President & Principal Consultant of Equity Through Action and Diana Ortiz, President & CEO of Doorways, sponsored by LeaderBridge, an initiative of the Crimsonbridge Foundation.
If you'd like to watch the webinar, you can watch the recording here: https://wawf.org/askhercaringforecap
C. Marie Taylor and Diana Ortiz both shed light on issues impacting nonprofit leaders of color. Here are just a few of the highlights:
  • When C. MarieTaylor heard a client say she was "Fannie Lou Hamer tired" at the top of the pandemic, she wanted to help them figure out how to change this.
  • Doorways gained their President & CEO Diana Ortiz during the pandemic. "As a woman of color leading an organization, we're under a microscope," she said."People are wondering not only how are you going to lead but how are you going to make the organization better."Diana also mentioned that women of color leaders are assumed to have a magic wand to fix everything.
  • In order to assess what is working and what isn't for leaders and staff, "Look at white dominant culture behaviors in organizations and ask "WHY?" Who started it? Can we do it a different way?" said C. Marie Taylor.
Learn about Equity Through Action here: https://equitythroughaction.com/
Learn about Doorways here: https://www.doorwaysva.org/
Thank you for standing with us! We know that our work is just the start of deeper community change.
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#AskHer Flier
#AskHer Flier

This edition of our #AskHer webinar featured Dr. Lea J.E. Austin, Executive Director of the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at the University of California, Berkeley and Nitza Seguí Albino, Vice Chair of the board of DC’s Multicultural Spanish Speaking Provider Association. Moderated by Vice President of Programs, Martine Sadarangani Gordon, the conversation focused on issues impacting the early care and education industry.

We had a neccessary and timely discussion with Dr. Lea J.E. Austin, Executive Director of the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at the University of California, Berkeley and Nitza Seguí Albino, Vice Chair of the board of DC's Multicultural Spanish Speaking Provider Association. Here are just a few of the highlights:
  • "We know in this country that 98% of other occupations are paid more than people who are working with our youngest children. And within that, we know that we have some serious racial inequities and wage gaps. As we think about building back better, for me it really means having those educators who are the linchpin to early care and education quality, thriving and for these to be good jobs so that we have people clamoring to be early educators in this country." - Dr. Lea Austin, director of the Center for the Study of Childcare Employment at UC Berkeley
  • "We don't see any accurate, published data around the early care sector. We only have estimates. It's very important for public policy and implementation to have hard data and mixed data. The voices of women themselves need to be taken in account." - Nitza Seguí Albino, Vice Chair of the board of DC's Multicultural Spanish Speaking Provider Association
  • Why is it so hard to get more compensation for education workers?  "Because its work performed by women and women of color - we know in this country, work by people of color and women is grossly undervalued."  Dr. Lea Austin, director of the Center for the Study of Childcare Employment at UC Berkeley
Thank you for standing with us and thank you so much to Bank of America for their partnership with the Women’s Foundation.We know that our work is just the start of deeper community change.
#AskHer / #AskThem is an interview series featuring women and gender non-conforming leaders, and The Women’s Foundation’s partners, community members and supporters who work tirelessly for women and girls. We curate in-depth conversations around complex issues affecting our constituents. Issues ranging from racism, racial justice, women, girls, intersectionality and more will be covered.

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This #AskHer webinar features Bré Rivera, a program officer at Groundswell Fund. We discussed issues most impacting the lives of Black and trans people in the nonprofit and philanthropy sectors. This timely conversation was moderated by Director of Communications, Mercy Chikowore.

This timely conversation had so many key points including:

  • For every $100 awarded by U.S. foundations only .04 cents supports transgender communities. [Source
  • The Black Trans Fund -- with a team and Advisory Board of Black trans people -- is a groundbreaking endeavor: the first national fund in the country dedicated to uplifting and resourcing Black trans social justice leaders.
  • There is a focus on Black trans communities being victims and not victors, which adds to the spike in violence and discrimination we're seeing against Black trans every year. 
  • Bré lifted up how policies that apply to cisgendered communities don't always apply to trans communities, and doesn't account for transphobia: "There is a belief that in order for trans folks to thrive, we have to be as close to cisgendered folks as possible. I don't believe that is true."

Learn more about the Black Trans Fund:

This was such a necessary conversation, which highlighted the lack of support and funding where it's needed the most. While we only scratched the surface on a few layers of the conversation, I encourage you to share this recording widely with your networks. 

Ready for our next #AskHer webinar? We're discussing intersectional feminism on October 18th with Dr. Kimberlé Crenshaw, Co-founder and Executive Director of the African American Policy Forum. RSVP today!

If you'd like to stay engaged with The Women's Foundation, please review our anti-racism resourcessign up to learn more about our fight for gender and racial justice, and donate so we can invest in women and girls of color.

#AskHer / #AskThem is an interview series featuring women and gender non-conforming leaders, and The Women’s Foundation’s partners, community members and supporters who work tirelessly for women and girls. We curate in-depth conversations around complex issues affecting our constituents. Issues ranging from racism, racial justice, women, girls, intersectionality and more will be covered.

Watch the webinar here: https://wawf.org/askherblacktransrecap

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Pay Home Visitors Their Worth
Pay Home Visitors Their Worth

Unless you’ve participated in a home visiting program yourself, you probably don’t know what home visiting is or what a home visitor does. In truth, there are different types of home visiting models, and the job of a home visitor can be slightly different depending on the model and individual family needs. But, regardless of the program, home visitors help families navigate complex resource and support systems so that families are healthy, safe, educated and economically secure.

That’s a huge job, and you’d think that anyone doing that job would be paid handsomely. Not so. Like many largely women workforces, they are undervalued and underpaid. Despite the fact that 81% of DC home visitors hold a bachelor’s degree or higher, only 34% report being satisfied by their salary. Further, more than half of DC home visitors report that their overall compensation is inadequate, and a third of DC home visitors do not anticipate being able to stay in the field long-term due to the lack of fair compensation. In a recent report by the DC Home Visiting Council, a home visitor is quoted as saying, “Nobody wants to be complacent. In this field, you can get very complacent, because the pay is low, but there’s no room for growth. You can be the best at it, and you’ll still be running in place.”

Read the full blog by our Vice President of Programs, Martine Sadarangani Gordon on The Women's Foundation website!

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After the latest grant round for the Early Care and Education Funders Collaborative, I received an email from the President of one of our new Grantee Partners. It was right before Thanksgiving, and she wrote, “I have so much to be thankful for. You, especially, and The Women’s Foundation will be on my Thanksgiving list from now on.”

Upon reading her email, I was overwhelmed with humility and gratitude. Here is a woman who works a full-time job and volunteers to run a nonprofit organization on evenings and weekends, and she’s thanking me? How can this be?

Unfortunately, it’s for the simple act of treating her with respect.

Those of us who work in philanthropy know that the sector is currently undergoing a reckoning of sorts. There are those of us who were discussing systemic racism, philanthropic power dynamics and the need for more trust-based philanthropy prior to this year. However, for many, this past summer meant they could no longer gloss over the articles, blogs, and other resource guides of how to invest with an equity lens. They now have to act.

The Women’s Foundation has been reforming our practices for some time now, and the members of the Early Care and Education Funders Collaborative (ECEFC) have come along with us. The ECEFC is a group of funders who pool their money and make grant award decisions together. The members have changed slightly over time, but the group has come together to invest in early education systems change in the DC metropolitan region for the past 13 years. The Women’s Foundation is a member of the group, but we also staff it.

The ECEFC members have been refining their priorities in the area of early education over the past four years by listening to community needs and recommendations, while also updating their giving processes to better align with their collective values around equity in early education. This year, in the midst of the global pandemic, the national childcare crisis, and overall local hardship, they took a giant leap forward. They said they wanted to invest in the largely women of color, and largely under-compensated, early education workforce. Specifically, they stated a desire to provide resources to early educator membership associations, community organizers, and policy advocates to elevate the voices of early educators in policy decisions. And they wanted to support early educator well-being.

They also supported me in streamlining the application process and working with applicants more directly. This allowed me to help applicants with few or no staff to draft portions of their grant applications, update deadlines so that folks who had a family emergency come up the day the application was due could still submit, and finalize applications in our online system for some organizations when their internet wasn’t working properly or their paying day-job required their attention.

The Women’s Foundation and the ECEFC operate this way to show respect. Respect for time. Respect for expertise. Respect for people.

This new way of working is how The Women’s Foundation staff is partnering with applicants across all of our priority areas. And, it is one of the many reasons that the members of the ECEFC trust The Women’s Foundation to be its home.

Ultimately, the ECEFC awarded grants to 13 organizations for 2021, totaling $367,000. In another demonstration of respect, the ECEFC made the intentional decision to fund general operating requests, and offered applicants a choice of applying for general operating or project-specific funds. Ultimately, 60% of the total funds awarded this round are general operating dollars, which the Grantee Partners can use as they see fit.

The 2021 Grantee Partners/Projects are:

  • Briya Public Charter School to support Multicultural Spanish Speaking Provider Association
  • DC Association for the Education of Young Children
  • DC Family Child Care Association
  • DC Fiscal Policy Institute
  • The Equity in Early Learning Initiative pilot project including Wonders Early Learning and Extended Day, The Campagna Center, Briya Public Charter School, and Bright Beginnings
  • House of Ruth to support a pilot project including KidSpace, Bright Beginnings and the Early Childhood Innovation Network focused on early educator wellbeing
  • Maryland Association for the Education of Young Children
  • Maryland State Family Child Care Association
  • Nonprofit Montgomery to support Montgomery Moving Forward
  • Northern Virginia Association for the Education of Young Children
  • Prince George’s Child Resource Center
  • SPACEs In Action
  • Voices for Virginia’s Children

There is still more work to be done, of course. Now that the funds are awarded, we will collect confidential feedback from applicants on how the process could be improved to better support them, to incorporate their needs, and to better respect them. And, what’s most important, we will improve our processes based on their feedback. Because just as we expect that nonprofits center the voices and lived experiences of those they serve in their work, philanthropy should do the same.

The 2020 members of the ECEFC include The Andrew and Julie Klingenstein Family Fund, Bainum Family Foundation, The Goldberg Family Fund, The J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, The Richard E. and Nancy P. Marriott Foundation, PNC Foundation, Washington Area Women’s Foundation, and The World Bank.

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Organization Information

Washington Area Women's Foundation

Location: Washington, DC - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @thewomensfndtn
Project Leader:
Emmy Torruellas
Development Associate
Washington, DC United States
$8,253 raised of $10,000 goal
 
173 donations
$1,747 to go
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