Tackling Wildlife Crime in Sumatra

by Sumatran Orangutan Society
Tackling Wildlife Crime in Sumatra
Tackling Wildlife Crime in Sumatra
Tackling Wildlife Crime in Sumatra
Tackling Wildlife Crime in Sumatra
Tackling Wildlife Crime in Sumatra
Tackling Wildlife Crime in Sumatra

Project Report | Mar 20, 2019
A week in the life of the Forest and Wildlife Protection Unit.

By Lucy Radford | Fundraising and Communications Officer

Patrolling the forest. Photo by Andrew Walmsley.
Patrolling the forest. Photo by Andrew Walmsley.

Working for the Forest and Wildlife Protection Unit is a very varied job. With an average of 1200km of precious forest covered by the team's patrols each year, every day brings new challenges in the mission to protect Sumatra's incredible wildlife.

So, what does a week in the life of the patrol team look like? Here's a recent example - shared with us by the team earlier this month.

Here is a list of threats found on patrol:

  1. A complete stun stool and other fishing stun equipment. The owner is unknown.
  2. Around 36 rubber trees in Gunung Leuser National Park. We removed the trees, as they are not permitted inside the national park.
  3. Evidence of land burning and oil palm trees being planted inside the national park area.
  4. A resident of a village near the forest has taken 33 saplings to be used to as building material. We found around 400 logs in his house, along with a machete and other tools. 
  5. Working with the WCS patrol team, we caught four poachers, with a mouse deer (Tragulus kancil) carcass as evidence, along with two confiscated air rifles, bullets, and a machete.

In the cases where the team identified the individuals responsible for the poaching or logging, they handed them over to the authorities for questioning. As the account above shows, it's not always possible to tell who is responsible for things like land burning or planting crops inside the national park, but by documenting everything they find, the team can build a picture of wildlife crime hotspots and ensure these areas are monitored even more closely.

Thank you for continuing to support the Forest and Wildlife Protection Unit. You are making this vital work possible.

Evidence of burning forest. Photo by OIC.
Evidence of burning forest. Photo by OIC.
Evidence of illegal logging. Photo by OIC.
Evidence of illegal logging. Photo by OIC.

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Organization Information

Sumatran Orangutan Society

Location: Abingdon, Oxon - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @orangutansSOS
Project Leader:
Lucy Radford
Abingdon , Oxfordshire United Kingdom
$8,407 raised of $45,000 goal
 
295 donations
$36,593 to go
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