Animals
 Australia
Project #13219

Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife

by Sydney Wildlife
Vetted
When first came into care
When first came into care

Our handraised macropods ( wallabies and Kangaroos) are growing fast and need to go back to their natural habitat.

This process of hand raising and rehabilitation can be a very long one when carers receive a hairless joey to look after when its mum has died. Joeys in this case can be in care for up to 18 months before release.

Once released it is very hard to tell most wallabies apart so we microchip all our macropods before releasing them back to thier native habitat. We have let our local vets and the road kill committee know about our microchiped macropods so they can check to see if they our handraised ones and contact us with the details.

Luckily so far none of our microchiped macropods have been found dead, which is a great feeling making us think we are doing right with our release techniques.

At one of our company volunteer days we were lucky to have Bayer employees come and help, two were vets and they microchiped a few wallabies while at the facility.

These wallabies still had a while to go in rehabilitation but it was great to get them microchiped and ready to go while they were still happy enough to be handled.

These particular wallabies have now been released and we hope are living happily in the wild.

Thanks to your wonderful donations we are able to continue our good work and give all our different animals that go through the rehabilitation facillity the best chance of surviving once released.

Bayer vet Microchipping
Bayer vet Microchipping
Still too friendly
Still too friendly
Release
Release
Epic Rescue
Epic Rescue

This is a story from one of Sydney Wildlife's Volunteers, Lynleigh, about one of her most recent rescues.

It started at a Scooter Workshop in Manly Vale on Sydney's Northern Beaches and ended on a construction site beside the Manly Swim Centre.

Sydney Wildlife got an Out of Hours call early in the morning with a report that a wallaby was stuck in some fencing on a busy road. She needed to be sedated and removed from the fencing. I loaded up my equipment and set off. Was it going to be that easy...? I'm sure you know the answer to that question...! Before I arrived on the scene she had managed to wriggle through the fence palings in a panic and was then on the loose on the main roads of Manly Vale Sydney.

Chasing a panicked wallaby through the streets whilst on foot is not easy. She boing-ed into the gardens of some units, then bolted off down a nearby street. It was only a matter of time before she hopped in front of a vehicle... Calls were flooding in to our office about a wallaby jumping haphazardly around the roads of Manly Vale.

I got in my car and tried to track her. A couple of hours had elapsed since the initial call-out so I was getting concerned about her stress levels - especially on such a hot day reaching 34C (93F). As I drove down the road I noticed a gathering of concerned-looking people outside a construction zone. A lovely Warringah Council Ranger was slowing the traffic. The poor wallaby had scrabbled underneath a massive skip bin where she was completely un-reachable. She was panting heavily and was hyper-salivating. The Rangers, the construction gang and I formulated a plan. I darted her with a tranquiliser, then when she was sleepy, the guys fashioned a scoop to push her towards our end of the skip. Wriggling under there for me was not an option, so we got one of the wiry construction guys to leopard crawl under there and grab her tail. Out she came.

After we secured her, the Rangers cooled her down by pouring bottles of water over her and then it was straight to the vet.

I rang ahead to Allambie Vet and they prepped the surgery for our arrival. As I pulled up, their doors flew open and the veterinary staff helped me in with my patient. They rushed her into surgery, recorded her vitals, put her on oxygen and a drip, cooled her down and administered pain relief. We discovered that she had a tiny pinkie joey in her pouch.

After an hour and a half of treatment by the extraordinary staff at Allambie Vet, she was released for transportation to Sydney Wildlife's Rehab Facility at Waratah Park. Our Facilities Manager rushed up there to receive the patient and we helped her to wake up calmly. She was soon relaxing after an immensely stressful day...!

Massive thanks to everyone involved.  A few weeks and several house calls later by the wonderful Terry Hills vets, she has now got the OK to be released along with her joey still in her pouch.

A great outcome for what started as a difficult and potentially dangerous rescue.

The wallaby safely secured
The wallaby safely secured
Council Rangers happy to assist
Council Rangers happy to assist
Wallaby undergoing vet treatment
Wallaby undergoing vet treatment
Now recovering in rehabilitation facility
Now recovering in rehabilitation facility
On the road to recovery
On the road to recovery
Volunteer enjoying their work day at the park.
Volunteer enjoying their work day at the park.

Instead of us doing all the talking, we decided to ask our fabulous volunteers to give us some feedback about their experience volunteering for the working bees at Waratah Park.  Here are some of their responses:

  1. Why did you choose Sydney Wildlife’s facility at Waratah Park to volunteer at?
  • I received an invite to attend and since I like being out in nature I thought it was worth trying it out.
  • I always love to do something related to Wildlife and Environment to keep this world a better place for our kids.   Keeping that in mind, I opt to volunteer at Waratah Park.
  • A strong passion for caring for the environment, including both bush care and native wildlife preservation

     2. How many times have you volunteered there?

  • 4 times  
  • 5 times 
  • Around 20   
  • 10+

     3.  Do you plan to continue volunteering there?

  • Absolutely! It is so nice to see the progress every time we are there, it really feels like we are making a difference.
  • Without doubt. There is much work to be done and being able to return each month and see the park in action, rehabilitating injured native animals in enclosures that we have built is very rewarding.

     4. What do you enjoy about volunteering at Waratah Park?

  • It’s out in nature and helping local animals that get very little/no funding makes it a worthy cause. To spend a day out of the office with Dell’s blessing makes work more enjoyable (even though the emails have piled up afterwards).
  • It makes me happy as I get chance to do some work that brings me close to nature, Also it’s an opportunity to meet different people and work with them.
  • The social interaction, teamwork, communicating with colleagues outside of the office environment.
  • The sense of camaraderie, of working towards a collective purpose

      5. Is there any other feedback you would like to give about the Sydney Wildlife facility at Waratah Park?

  • The event is very well organized and efficient. All the volunteers are helpful and friendly which makes the day so much fun. It’s also great for networking.
  • It’s a great facility and a brilliant location to rehabilitate native animals. I hope Sydney wildlife can continue to operate out of the park and continue to build new enclosures and maintain the facilities.
  • Thank you for the great work you do day in and day out – the world needs more people like the volunteers at Sydney Wildlife

We hope that all the people that volunteer their time to help us keep the facility maintained and functional continue to enjoy the experience like those above.

If your company is interested in volunteering at Waratah Park please contact us through www.sydneywildlife.org.au 

The time and energy you all put in is outstanding and we are truly greatful.  

Thank you.

Merry Christmas and thank you to our supporters.
Merry Christmas and thank you to our supporters.
Volunteers fitting out the Glider cage
Volunteers fitting out the Glider cage
Sugar Glider
Sugar Glider

Now that we have expanded our facility to include all native wildlife, we have been very busy with quite a few different species being rehabilitated.

 

We were lucky enough to be able to assist in the final rehabilitation stage for three elusive Sugar Gliders. Prior to coming to our facility, they had been handraised by one of our wonderful Sydney Wildlife volunteer carers. Two of them came into care after their home was destroyed and one had been caught by a cat.

 

When they were approaching time for their release they were bought to our facility for rehabilitation where they stayed for a couple of months building up their muscle strength and foraging skills. As they are mostly active at night, we were able to watch them on the infrared motion activated wildlife cameras we purchased from your donations, this showed us how quick they were moving around the facility and successfully finding their food.

 

Once it was determined they were ready to be released they were caught, weighed and then transported to the other side of Sydney for release back where they originated. The nesting box they used whilst in rehabilitation was secured in a suitable tree and they were put back into it giving them a familiar base to release from.

 

The release site was on a property where people could visually keep an eye on the movements of the sugar gliders. After release, they were seen returning to their box on and off before eventually disappearing to start their new life.

 

It is your donations that have made housing, feeding and releasing these beautiful animals possible, we thank you.

Carer releasing into rehabilitation aviary
Carer releasing into rehabilitation aviary
Sugar Gliders finding their way around enclosure
Sugar Gliders finding their way around enclosure
Sugar Gliders in their nesting box
Sugar Gliders in their nesting box
Baby Sugar Gliders
Baby Sugar Gliders
Global Giving Representatives with Diamond Python
Global Giving Representatives with Diamond Python

We were recently lucky enough to be visited by Alex and Amanda from Global Giving in the USA at our rehabilitation facility at Waratah Park.  

During their visit, we were able to get a better understanding of how Sydney Wildlife can benefit from the partnership we have with Global Giving and the many services and tools available for us to use.  They provided great feedback on how other organisations have benefited from their alliance with Global Giving which has given us a few new ideas that we are presently looking into. We are also pleased to report that our project is performing extremely well with a very high rating of interaction both via the Global Giving website and also via our regular project reports.

Whilst we were able to learn a lot from Amanda and Alex, we were also able to teach them about Australia's native wildlife.  

They were brave enough to visit our rehabiliation facility during a corporate working bee on a cold and wet Friday morning.  They were given a tour of our facilities and were able to get up close and personal with some of our education animals breaking down the barrier between reptile and human.

We would like to thank Alex and Amanda for their continued help and advice.

Stay tuned for our next report and prepare to be amazed as work continues on our facilities

Pythons tongue
Pythons tongue
Injured Blue Tongue Lizard
Injured Blue Tongue Lizard
Brush Tail Possums
Brush Tail Possums
Cloudy Educating Volunteers
Cloudy Educating Volunteers
 

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Organization Information

Sydney Wildlife

Location: Sydney, NSW - Australia
Website: http:/​/​www.sydneywildlife.org.au
Project Leader:
Joan Reid
Lindfield, NSW Australia

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