Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife

by Sydney Wildlife Vetted since 2013 Top Ranked Site Visit Verified
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Rehabilitate Wallabies & Other Native Wildlife
Feather Tail Glider
Feather Tail Glider

As a result of the work done by our Sydney Wildlife volunteers, the companies that volunteer their time and the local community support, the word is getting out about the magnificent work Sydney Wildlife is doing at the rehabilitation facility to give the animals that come in to care the best possible chance of a successful release back into their native habitat.

To assist in increasing the awareness of the different types of native animals we care for, the habitat they live in and the dangers they face, a local photographer, Peter Sharp from Tame and Wild Studios, has volunteered his services to capture some wonderful images of Australian wildlife rescued by Sydney Wildlife Carers.  The images are used by our volunteers when doing educational talks giving the general public a chance to see up close what our wildlife looks like when normally you would only see glimpses of them at night time.  

The quality of the images allows us to explain and show the features of these animals and help with identification without the need for live animals to be present at the talk.

A good example of this is the feather tail glider.  We are able to show how it gets its name from its feather like tail.  We can also show examples of baby animals that are normally not seen outside of the mothers pouch.  This is extremely useful when educating the public on what to do should they come across an injured animal that happens to have a baby joey in its pouch.

We wanted to share with some of the magnificent images Peter has captured for us of our unique Australia Native Wildlife.  

www.tameandwildstudio.com

Thank you to all of our supporters that continue to donate to our project allowing us to keep making a difference.

Death Adder
Death Adder
Tawny Frogmouth
Tawny Frogmouth
Brush Tail Possum
Brush Tail Possum
Echidna
Echidna
Wombat Joeys
Wombat Joeys
One of our rescuers getting control of the talons.
One of our rescuers getting control of the talons.

Once in a lifetime you get to cross paths with an animal so majestic that it’s almost heart-stopping. Two of our amazing office volunteers - Susan and Katie - took the call from a resident in Mona Vale. Ian was pretty sure he had a wedge-tailed eagle in his suburban backyard. Given that we only have about 2 pairs on the Northern Beaches, everyone was a bit sceptical...

Two Sydney Wildlife rescuers - Susan and Lynleigh - were dispatched to the site and were thrilled (and a tiny bit nervous) to be faced with this incredible raptor! Catching him was going to be a bit of a challenge as he had already started calculating ways of bolting. After some artful ‘herding’ with giant blankets, Oracle (what we named him) was cornered and our rescuers were able to wrap him up, take control of the talons and get him into a bunker box for transportation to a veterinarian.

The Wildlife Hospital at Taronga was the obvious place to take Oracle as his needs would be quite specific and their team of veterinarians have considerable experience with raptors. He was immediately assessed, x-rayed, given treatment, fed and housed. He was found to have a puncture wound in his mouth and a couple in his chest, as well as an eye injury. He also wasn’t able to perch or take flight. They also informed us that he is a young bird - probably not even a year old yet.

Whilst trying to piece together how Oracle came to be in a backyard in Mona Vale, Margaret - another Sydney Wildlife rescuer and photographer - managed to get in touch with some of the other extraordinary photographers from the area. One had witnessed a mid-air fight between the pair of white-bellied sea eagles and the pair of wedge-tailed eagles about 6kms from where we rescued Oracle. Thank you to Biggles Csolander for the amazing images of this encounter. The images show adult birds but we suspect that Oracle had been involved in the melee before these pics were taken.

After 2 weeks in care with the incredible team at Taronga, Oracle was ready for the next step in his rehabilitation process. Lynleigh and Connor collected him for a 3-hour drive to the Southern Highlands where he would have the privilege of meeting the one-and-only Peg McDonald of Higher Ground Raptors. Peg is beyond amazing!

Peg set Oracle up in an aviary with CCTV where she could observe his movements and decipher what exercise regime he required for rehab.

Luckily the name Oracle is gender-neutral as Peg thinks he is a she 

This was a great example of many Wildlife organisations working together to provide the best outcome possible for our gorgeous animals.  

Imagine finding this raptor in your backyard
Imagine finding this raptor in your backyard
Oracle in one of Peg
Oracle in one of Peg's wonderful aviaries
The mid-air fight with wedge-tails and sea-eagles
The mid-air fight with wedge-tails and sea-eagles
Lynleigh and Connor bring Oracle to Higher Ground
Lynleigh and Connor bring Oracle to Higher Ground
I know how to eat by myself now
I know how to eat by myself now

One of the great advantages of having a rehabilitation facility is being able to give the animals a change to become independent and dehumanised before their release.  To do this we need to be as hands off and invisible to the animals as possible but we do need to continue to monitor their progress and keep an eye on their behaviour and any injuries that they might be recovering from.

Recently we have installed solar powered motion infrared cameras to capture images of the animals during the day and at night when they are moving around their enclosure without any human presence.

That benefits of monitoring the animals remotely include:

  • Being able to capture images of the nocturnal animals in their enclosures at night time when they are active.  
  • Reduces stress on the animals by not being in the enclosures as often. 
  • For animals recovering from injury, we are able to keep any eye on their movements and behaviour to alert volunteers if any additional intervention is required.
  • If multiple animals are sharing an enclosure, we are able to make sure all are feeding equally. Not one dominating the feeding area over another.
  • Ensuring there is no bullying between individuals or species.
  • Give us visibility of any unwanted pests or predators allowing us to take action.

By being able to doing all of this remotely via the cameras, the animals are able to have an environment that has minimal human interference allowing them to develop and hone their natural behaviours, instincts and feeding habits.

We are also able to capture the wonderful work the many volunteers do in the facility to keep it running. 

Not meant to be out during the day.
Not meant to be out during the day.
Plover learning to fly
Plover learning to fly
Are we sure the wallabies are eating the food?
Are we sure the wallabies are eating the food?
Volunteers captured in action
Volunteers captured in action
Topsy Turvy, Photo by Peter Sharp.
Topsy Turvy, Photo by Peter Sharp.

We have recently had a beautiful Boobook owl come into care with Sydney wildlife.  The Boobook owl is the smallest and most common owl in Australia.

 His story started at a school where he was found early in the morning on the ground being bullied by other local bird species.  He was taken to the local vet who then contacted Sydney Wildlife to organise a Carer to come and collect him to nurse him back to health and monitor his rehabilitation.

It became quickly apparent that he was very ill and at stages could not even stand up.  He required intensive care and needed to be force fed to ensure he was getting the nutrients required to rehabilitate. Gradually he began to gain strength, put on weight and be able to feed by himself.

What was still puzzling was that, at first, he would always hold his head low and completely upside down. (see photo)  After 2 months of regular physiotherapy he started to hold his head higher and it was also turning around so it was now the right way up.

After 3 months, he was moved to our rehabilitation facility as we thought the stimulation of being in a more natural environment would make him use his neck more.  A bit of self-Physio.

 After only a couple of weeks in the rehabilitation facility, and I think you will agree from the photos, there has been significant improvement in his condition.

 We still do not know at this stage if his recovery will be enough for him to be released but he is eating well and continuing to improve. His recovery may take months yet as vets feel there is muscle or tendon damage which takes a long time to treat.

 Owls are quite big eaters.  He eats 1 mouse and 1 chicken neck a day as well as the insects he catches in his enclosure.  As the mouse and chicken necks are not available naturally while he is in rehabilitation, these are purchased frozen and provided to the owl by our volunteers.  Your wonderful donations are helping to keep our Boobook and other animals fed and alive.

 For this we thank you so very much.

Neck in a better position
Neck in a better position
Starting to exercise wings
Starting to exercise wings
You have helped Spike the Echidna
You have helped Spike the Echidna

To celebrate 5 years of the "Rehabilitating Wallabies and Other Native Wildlife" project, we thought we would share with you how far we have come since the beginning.  We really wouldn’t be able to do what we do without your generosity.

Since we began back in April 2013, we have received a whopping 333 donations totaling $17,009.  We can't thank you all enough as even the smallest donations help.

As the donations came in, it enabled us to purchase building materials and, over time, expand the number of enclosures in the facility allowing us to take in more animals for rehabilitation.  We started off the facility with one rehabilitation area for macropods, which has now doubled in size and includes a padded quarantine room and a small-enclosed area for injured animals needing daily treatment making it easier to handle them.  Over the last 5 years, we have built an additional 8 enclosures allowing us to take in larger quantities and varieties of species.  

By having the variety of different enclosures now, we are able to offer around 25 animals a month the chance to spend time in the facility, to build up their strength, recover from their injuries and return to the wild fit and healthy to continue living the life they were before being injured and needing our help.  As a true testament to the success of the facility, none of the animals we have microchipped prior to release have returned into care due to not coping in the wild. 

Not only have we been able to build the enclosures but you have made it possible to buy food and formulas required and pay vet bills when needed. 

In the next 5 years we hope to continue to improve on our successes and make our facility an even better one for our precious wildlife. 

Design and Build
Design and Build
Enclosure finished and in use
Enclosure finished and in use
Swamp wallabies enjoying their browse
Swamp wallabies enjoying their browse
Is part of an old aviary in the weeds?
Is part of an old aviary in the weeds?
Found, fixed and now replanting.
Found, fixed and now replanting.
 

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Organization Information

Sydney Wildlife

Location: Sydney, NSW - Australia
Website:
Project Leader:
Joan Reid
Lindfield, NSW Australia
$17,772 raised of $30,000 goal
 
360 donations
$12,228 to go
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