Support for Have A Heart-Namibia

by Animal-Kind International
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Support for Have A Heart-Namibia
Rocky from Rehoboth-a prolapse and TVT!
Rocky from Rehoboth-a prolapse and TVT!

You may have noticed that we updated the name and description of our project on GlobalGiving to more closely reflect how Have a Heart-Namibia uses AKI (your) donations. Specifically, we support HaH's priority needs, which over the last few years has been the AKI-Emergency Fund and the HaH Lifetime Care Program. Both of these programs help ensure that spayed/neutered pets receive the care they need to survive and thrive. We anticipate supporting these two HaH programs for the foreseeable future (i.e., for a long time!)

These are some of the cats and dogs who, over the last few months, benefitted from your donations:

In August, Rocky and her owners (see photo) came to the Rehoboth vet clinic when they noticed Rocky had lost her appetite. It turned out that she had a uterus prolapse as well as TVT, transmissable venereal tumor. These are two big problems, and you can imagine the families' relief when Penny (vet nurse at the Rehoboth clinic) told them they qualify for the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund and that Rocky could get the treatment she needed. First, Rocky was spayed and the prolapse was dealt with. Then, TVT cancer treatment, once a week for 6 weeks, began. Now Rocky is back with her family, healthy, and her appetite is 100% restored.

Dusty is from Swakopmund and this poor guy had mange and TVT. When someone in Swakopmund needs extra help to cover vet care, they have to go to the vet clinic and talk to Sheelagh, the vet nurse, who is very strict and makes sure no one uses the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund when they don't really need or deserve the support. Sheelagh said Dusty's case makes all the extra work with HaH worth it, because the owner so appreciated the help she got from the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund and was so grateful for what we are doing. First Dusty was neutered (see picture) and then he was treated for mange and TVT-all successfully.

Bruno is from Rehoboth. He is the big brother of Blacky (who also received help from the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund). Bruno and Blacky are two of the very first HaH customers in 2013. How wonderful that they are still around-- and so loved by their family!! This is the goal with every spay/neuter, giving the animals a chance at a long, happy, and healthy life. Penny, at the Rehoboth clinic, asked if the Emergency Fund could help Bruno; he had an abcess under the throat and needed to be sedated to have it properly drained and cleaned. Of course, Geesche told her, "anything for Bruno!!!" So Bruno got sedated and cleaned and received his take-home medication and because he is a senior dog and a bit on the skinny side he also got a bag of extra nutritious dog food. (see photo of Bruno with his owner)

Little Blackie is also from Rehoboth. HaH had neutered him at the end of October, and then, a week later, on November 4, he was back at the clinic in Rehoboth, where he had to spend 2 weeks because he had a skin problem and needed treatment every day - sometimes just cleaning, sometimes he needed injections. The clinic ran out of food for Blackie. So the Emergency Fund kicked in the few US dollars for nutritious kitty food, in addition to the treatment for his skin problem.

Little Granny was heavily pregnant when someone kicked her! Luckily someone cared about her and brought her to the clinic in Rehoboth. She was immediately operated on but her only kitten was dead. Granny was spayed and Penny made sure she stayed at the clinic a few extra days to ensure whe was over her trauma. Granny was doing well, except she couldn't poop so again the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund stepped in and covered the cost of meds. And then, everyone agreed that it would be best if Granny found a different home. Penny got to work and found a new and safe family for Granny and we hope she will never ever be kicked again in her life! (see photo)

Mia is an old HaH customer from Rehoboth. She was spayed in April 2022. Mia may have gotten stuck in razor wire by the look of her injury. Luckily her owners knew where to get help. They brought her to the Rehoboth clinic, where she got 30 stitches to sew up that bad injury (see photo)! A couple of weks later, Mia went back to the clinic to get her stitches removed.

Check out our 2022 pie chart, showing how HaH-Namibia used your 2022 donations.

In 2022, 250 dogs and 26 cats benefitted under the HaH Lifetime Care Program.

In 2022, 50 dogs and 32 cats received helped through the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund.

That's a lot of lucky cats and dogs thanks to you!

Happy Holidays, and wishing for a kinder 2023.

 

 

Dusty post-neuter; mange & TVT treatment next
Dusty post-neuter; mange & TVT treatment next
Bruno sedated (with owner)-abscess treated
Bruno sedated (with owner)-abscess treated
Blackie, treated for a skin problem
Blackie, treated for a skin problem
Granny was kicked when she was pregnant!
Granny was kicked when she was pregnant!
Mia, large gash sewn up with 30 stitches!
Mia, large gash sewn up with 30 stitches!
How HaH-Namibia used your 2022 donations
How HaH-Namibia used your 2022 donations

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Lady became the Tsumeb vet clinic's mascot
Lady became the Tsumeb vet clinic's mascot

From January through June, you have helped 31 dogs and 9 cats get vet treatment through the AKI-Have a Heart Emergency Fund and 150 dogs and 26 cats get their Lifetime Care treatment (check-up, boosters, and parasite treatment for all HaH spay/neuter clients-for life). Our last GlobalGiving Progress Report took you through some of the Emergency Fund cases from January through March. We'll continue in this report with some Emergency Fund cases from April through June.

Lady in Tsumeb: Everyone agreed Lady is a very special dog. She was hit by a car and was lying on the side of the road for a day and night before someone took the initiative and called Have a Heart. She was badly hurt, and that made her aggressive; no one could get near her at first. But with patience -and some courage- her helpers were able to transport her to the vet clinic. Lady was a street dog, with no one who could cover her vet care, so of course, the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund stepped in. She had a large open wound on her leg (we won't show a picture of that), which was treated. She had torn ligaments and even after over a month at the clinic, wasn't putting weight on her rear leg. She became the vet clinic's mascot and was fostered at a home on nights and weekends. (see photo of Lady as the vet clinic mascot)

Mercy in Karibib: Mercy is an old HaH customer. Her family knew that the mobile clinic was going to be in Karibib in April and went there for help. They took Mercy along to show the vet her belly, where she had a tumor. She needed a tumor resection surgery, which was successful and later she went home with her family. (see photo of Mercy with her family after sugery)

Ousietjie Basson in Goreangab: Ousietjie is pronounced Ousiki and means something like "my old little friend" in Afrikaans. She had a greenstick fracture (the bone bends and cracks instead of breaking-like a green branch) on her left front leg. Dr Baines from the mobile clinic bandaged Ousietjie's leg and sent her home. (see photo of Ousietjie going home)

Jannie from Ariamsvlei: A few years ago a truck driver found Jannie and his sister Sannie. They were dumped when they were kittens. The truck driver kept them and they are his best friends. When the owner was driving his truck, Jannie went with him on the road, but Sannie didn't like to travel, so stayed with a friend. Since covid, the truck driver wasn't earning much money and started sleeping in his car-along with Jannie and Sannie. On May 23, Jannie was hit by a car and his leg and right eye were injured. His owner immediately took him to the emergency clinic in Windhoek, where he was stabilized. Jannie had a good chance of a full recoery, but the owner had no money to pay for this treatment, so he was faced with the decision to have Jannie euthanized.

Geesche (HaH) wrote, "What a nightmare. Letting your best friend go just because of the lack of money? No, not when there is an AKI emergency fund! We know the clinic will be keeping their costs down, but Jannie will have to get extensive treatment and pain control, maybe an eye removal at some stage (his leg will heal without an operation). He will definitely have to stay at the clinic for a few days. Jannie is so much loved and cared for, he is so important for his owner in such tough times, AKI might not only have saved his life, but also his owner's...?"

Many pictures and updates later, by mid-June, Jannie was back with his owner and his sister Sannie. (see pictures of Jannie with his human, and Jannie with Sannie)

Charles: Little 8 week old feral kitty, Charles, was hit with a rock on his head! Luckily the caretaker of the feral colony saw Charles soon after and she took him home. At first his wounds didn't look too bad, but they got infected and full of pus and his eye started bleeding. Charles needed to see a vet! His wounds were cleaned and he got antibiotics and eye drops and by the next day, was already feeling better.

But about a month later Charles had to go back to the vet clinic. This time it was his teeth. His baby teeth weren't falling out and his adult teeth were coming in. If he was still a feral kitty, he wouldn't have gotten the help he needed and would have had serious problems some day. Thanks to the support of the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund, Charles received the vet care he needed. We received this message from the vet:

Unfortunately we had to pull one of his permanent K9s because it grew skewed due to the baby tooth not coming out and it was already making a hole in his top gums. We also pulled the rest of his baby teeth and he was castrated. He is on antibiotics and pain medication. We also checked his eye, it is perfectly fine but sometime in the future the part of his third eyelid, that is scratching his eye will have to be burnt off. But that will be a quick procedure. He might have to go on eyedrops for the rest of his life. Due to the trauma he had to his eye, this is not a "normal" third eyelid procedure, in his case only the hairfolicals can be burned off. There is no damage to his eye so far, but he must be monitored closely."

Poor little guy! He's in foster care and won't be living the life of a feral cat, so he will be fine. (see picture of Charles when he arrived at the vet clinic after being hit by a rock)

Beauty from Rehoboth: Beauty's owner Heinrich is disabled and isn't working. One evening he was worried about Beauty because she wasn't eating and just laying around. He walked over to vet tech Penny's house to ask for help. Penny explained about the Animal-Kind International-Have a Heart Emergency Fund and that as part of the agreement to be treated, Beauty would have to be spayed when old enough and feeling better. The next day Heinrich brought Beauty to the clinic where she was given a check up, treated for tick-borne illnesses, and was sent home with a plan to return for her spay. Heinrich held up his part of the agreement and Beauty is now healthy and spayed!

There are so many more cats and dogs who have been helped thanks to your support for AKI's GlobalGiving fundraiser. Thank you from all of us--AKI, HaH, the cats, dogs, and their families- we are so grateful for your support!

Mercy had a tumor on her belly that was removed
Mercy had a tumor on her belly that was removed
Ousietjie-greenstick fracture-mended & sent home
Ousietjie-greenstick fracture-mended & sent home
Jannie-happy to be home with owner-& vice versa!
Jannie-happy to be home with owner-& vice versa!
Jannie and Sannie, together again
Jannie and Sannie, together again
Charles was hit with a rock, wounds infected
Charles was hit with a rock, wounds infected
Beauty and Heinrich from Rehoboth
Beauty and Heinrich from Rehoboth

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Neusie, an Emergency Fund client, recovering
Neusie, an Emergency Fund client, recovering

We've been overwhelmed with requests to use the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund, but also overwhelmed by how many animals we've been able to help and how grateful people are to receive our support. And thanks to your donations, when Geesche (Have a Heart) is approached for help, she never has to turn any deserving animal and human family away. Here are the stories of some recent Emergency Fund clients-from January through March (and this is by far, not all of them).

Neusie is from Rehoboth, Namibia. (Rehoboth is a tough place-for animals and people alike. Thanks to vet nurse Penny and the Rehoboth Vet Clinic, HaH and the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund can be so active and helpful there). Neusie (Afrikaans for "Little Nose") was spayed last year. Neusie had a wound on her upper rear leg and her owner asked the Rehoboth Clinic for help. The Emergency Fund was put to use. Neusie was checked out by a vet and it turned out the small wound was a maggot worm and it burst inside causing an internal abscess! Neusie was booked in for the night and in the morning, the vet sedated her and put a drain in to remove the pus. Neusie stayed another night at the clinic, but then went home to recover -and is now 100% healthy.

Candice is a member of a group of cats living at a restaurant where they are welcome and have a great young employee looking after them. He made sure all of them got spayed/neutered. Recently he noticed one of the cats didn't feel well and he took her to the vet clinic. It turned out she had mastitis (she had kittens before he had a chance to get her spayed). The restaurant employee (see photo of him holding Candice) didn't have the money for treatment, so Geesche authorized use of the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund. She was treated for mastitis, and later, she was spayed.

Cleo was brought to the vet clinic by her owner to be spayed via HaH but the vet realized that she was sick, not well enough for surgery. Cleo recently had 5 puppies and all 5 of them had died. She wasn't eating or drinking and was shivering, but the vet couldn't find anything wrong with her physically. She thought Cleo had PTSD after losing all her babies. The Emergency Fund was authorized for Cleo's care, and she was given injections of vitamins and went home. Two weeks later she was scheduled for spay but the vet found an infection in her mouth and she was put on antibiotics-also thanks to the Emergency Fund. The vet decided to give her a bit more time before spaying her. Later, when she returned to the clinic, she was healthy and finally she was spayed (picture below).

Little Cooper and Keke (see photos) are only 4 months old and they had parvo. Penny, a vet nurse in Rehoboth, asked Geesche for help: "We have 2 dogs here, both with parvo, one is on a drip and the other one is in better condition and can just go home with tablets. The owner can't afford for Cooper to stay on the drip as well as tablets for Keke. I wanted to know if you can help, I feel so sorry for her." Both Keke and Cooper received the care they needed to recover-and they were sent back home, and Geesche sent this message, "Thank you AKI, you gave 2 dogs a fighting chance and their people hope!"

This is a sad story, this little girl is no longer with us. Tokkie was named after a beetle in Namibia. Tokkie from Rehoboth (photo below) was brought to the Rehoboth Vet Clinic because she was very sick. She had a lot of fleas and ticks, was never vaccinated, and the owner had no money. The vet suspected distemper, something easy to treat in early stages and every dog spayed through HaH is vaccinated against it. But for Tokkie it was too late. To prevent further suffering, she was euthanized, thanks to the AKI Emergency Fund. Geesche always looks for the positive, and said, "In this case, the owner of Tokkie now knows there is help through the AKI Emergency Fund, and he will talk about it to friends and family and if he will get another dog, he knows where to go when help is needed and for a spay or neuter and parasite treatment and vaccination. So because of Tokkie other dogs and cats will be helped in future."

Of course not all rescue stories have happy endings, but it's important for someone to step in and help even in cases like Tokkie's, and thanks to your support-we can.

 

Candice had mastitis
Candice had mastitis
Cleo, PTSD(?) and an infection
Cleo, PTSD(?) and an infection
Cooper had parvo-an Emergency Fund client
Cooper had parvo-an Emergency Fund client
Keke, Cooper's friend, had parvo too
Keke, Cooper's friend, had parvo too
Tokkie had distemper, but help came too late
Tokkie had distemper, but help came too late

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Trixie recovering from surgery-Windhoek vet clinic
Trixie recovering from surgery-Windhoek vet clinic

The results are in for the months of July through December and they are impressive-and they were made possible thanks to your donations:

HaH's Lifetime Care Program: 155 dogs and 15 cats received their boosters and external and internal parasite treatments. (US$845)

The AKI-HaH Emergency Fund: 7 dogs and 8 cats received emergency treatments (US$1182), and 1 cat received 2 months of special urinary diet food ($35).

And HaH still has almost US$500 remaining from AKI to start the year off.

(Add the above to the numbers in the 1st half of the year: 362 dogs and 38 cats who received help under the Lifetime Care Program; and 7 dogs and 4 cats who received care under the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund.)

Here are some of the cats and dogs who benefited over the last 6 months from our partnership with HaH and you:

 

Back in May 2020, HaH treated Trixie (thanks to the AKI-HaH Emergency Fund), a tiny 6 kg. dog, for tick fever and TVT. They then spayed her. In October 2021, poor Trixie was the victim of a cruel person who threw a large rock at her. In Keetmanshoop, where Trixie lives, she couldn't get an x-ray, and her leg was obviously in bad shape. She needed to get to Windhoek, where it could be x-rayed and treated. In Windhoek, the vet discovered that her leg was broken at the joint. Surgery was scheduled as quickly as possible. The AKI-HaH Emergency Fund covered the full cost of Trixie's vet care! After surgery, when it was safe to move her, and once a ride was found, she was placed at Keetmans SPCA, where she was given a safe, quiet place to heal until she was returned to her family. (See picture of Trixie at the Windhoek clinic)

Dr. Baines' mobile clinic was in Uis for a spay day in early November and Bruno's family immediately took him to the clinic to have his eye checked. Dr. Baines saw that this was an old injury, a ruptured eyeball - very very painful. Geesche said, "This is another prime example of why we need AKI's emergency fund so much. Uis is a small town in the middle of nowhere, 120 kilometers from any doctor (human or animal). For Dr. Baines to be able to help Bruno when he was in Uis for the spay day and without a worry how to cover the cost is all Bruno and Dr. Baines needed." Dr. Baines removed his eye and Bruno is now pain-free. (see picture of Bruno below)

Girly from Rehoboth became an Emergency Fund client when she was booked for her spay, vaccination, and parasite treatment, but during pre-check, the vet noticed that she wasn't well. She had a fever (41 degrees C/105.8 F) and a test revealed Girly had tick bite fever. With tick bite fever, the blood doesn't clot well, and Girly could have bled to death during surgery. Girly's spay was postponed and she was given injections to protect her liver and to start her antibiotic course. She was also prescribed antibiotic pills for 10 days. After her treatment, Girly was spayed and went home with her loving family. (see picture below)

Brown Cat from Epako Township in Gobabis needed help urgently, it appeared that something had damaged his spine (hit by a vehicle, a rock, or was it a disease?) In September, he became an Emergency Fund client-100% of Brown Cat's vet care was covered by the Fund. When Volunteer Willem saw Brown Cat and how difficult it was for him to walk, he rushed Brown Cat to the vet for x-rays, which showed that he has narrowed spinal tissue--spinal stenosis. The vet prescribed meds, and he was sterilized. Geesche said, "Without AKI he would not have a chance! THANK YOU!!!" (see picture below)

Babatjie - pronounced Babakey - is Afrikaans for small baby. Babatjie is from Gobabis and one day a young boy came running to Willem (he's well known for doing TNR in Gobabis for HaH) and told him about an injured cat. Willem found Babatjie - who is an old HaH customer - with a badly damaged leg. The vet said there are only two options, put her down or remove her leg. So Babatjie became an Emergency Fund client and her leg was removed. For her recovery she stayed with Willem and soon she was able to run around and play like nothing had happened. (see picture below)

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR HELP IN 2021

FROM ANIMAL-KIND INTERNATIONAL, HAVE A HEART-NAMIBIA, AND ALL THE ANIMALS YOU'VE HELPED THIS YEAR!

Bruno's ruptured eye is treated-no more pain!
Bruno's ruptured eye is treated-no more pain!
Girly treated for tick-bite fever before her spay
Girly treated for tick-bite fever before her spay
Brown Cat hanging out between his 2 doggy pals
Brown Cat hanging out between his 2 doggy pals
Babatjie's leg was amputated-she's doing great!
Babatjie's leg was amputated-she's doing great!

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Dog Sure-broken leg treated
Dog Sure-broken leg treated

Since our last Progress Report (May 19), requests for the AKI-HAH Emergency Fund have been coming in faster than we can replenish the fund. In part that's good--we know we're providing a much-needed service; in part-obviously, it means it's hard to keep up with the need. We are so grateful for your support, which helps Animal-Kind International help Have A Heart-Namibia provide Lifetime Care to returning spay/neuter clients, including boosters and anti-parasite treatments, and to provide emergency vet care when owners are unable to afford it (the AKI-HAH Emergency Fund). 

Here are some of the cats and dogs who have been helped in the last few months thanks to your donations.

JUNE

Dog Sure got hit by a car and his leg was broken. His family asked for help to pay for much-needed vet care, and vet nurse Sheelagh asked Geesche if the AKI-HAH Emergency Fund could be used. Geesche agreed. Xrays were done of Sure's leg to help Dr. Winterbach determine how to treat him. It turned out that Sure only needed a splint and rest, no surgery. Sure had to go for weekly check-ups and bandage changes to make sure all healed properly. During one of these visits, Sure was also neutered and vaccinated and treated against parasites--full service! (See picture of Sure with his family at the vet's office)

Kitzie, an old HaH customer in Luderitz, was run over by a car. Her owner, in tears, brought Kitzie to the Luderitz SPCA and Kitzie was seen by the volunteer vet nurse, who knew of the AKI-HAH Emergency Fund, and requested help. It turned out that Kitzie needed to get to Windhoek to be seen by a vet there, where she could get xrays and follow-up care. Kitzie's xrays showed a broken pelvis but no surgery needed, only 6 weeks of cage rest. Clinic employee Niki offered to foster Kitzie during those 6 weeks, and when she was well, she was transported the 900 km back to Luderitz and to her very grateful family.

Not all stories are happy ones, as we know. That is certainly true in Boe Boe's case. Boe Boe's owner moved away and left him behind! He became a community dog in Luderitz, fed and looked after by a number of people. Boe Boe was in the wrong place at the wrong time-hanging around a home when robbers showed up, they stabbed him. One of the people who looked after Boe Boe saw his injuries and contacted a vet for help. The vet's office contacted Geesche, and she agreed to use the AKI-HAH Emergency Fund. Sadly, even though he got the best treatment available-thanks to the Fund, Boe Boe just didn't pull through, the injuries were too serious. At least he was cared for and out of pain during those last days (see picture).

Joan, who takes care of many cats for HaH was told about someone on the street who was selling 7 tiny kittens. When Joan arrived only 5 were still there and out of the 5, 2 had already died. Joan took the remaining 3 to the vet for check-ups, where they tried everything but one was too sick and weak died. The other two received the treatment they needed -thanks to the Emergency Fund-and then went to foster care until old enough to be sterilized and adopted (see photo of one of the  kitties below).

JULY

Glitter is an old HaH customer, very much loved by his family. Glitter had blood in his urine, and his worried family took him to a vet. Tests and treatment costs were more than the family could afford, so they asked HaH for help and thanks to AKI's Emergency Fund, Glitter got the help he needed. His blood test results were good, sonar showed some sediment in the bladder, no visible big concrements. He stayed overnight and the next day the sonar was repeated. The vet diagnosed idiopathic cystitis. Unfortunately, even with treatment, the problem might return and in some cases requires surgery. But for now Glitter is happily back with his family! (see photo below)
Snowy (photo below) had a badly injured leg and his owner Jo-Dee, a student, couldn't afford the vet care that Snowy needed. The AKI-HAH Emergency Fund stepped in and Snowy wasneutered and his leg was stitched up.
AUGUST
Wolf from Windhoek had a cauliflower ear. It doesn't look too bad, but in the long term it can lead to serious ear infections and that can be extremely painful and can lead to death. A minor surgery, thanks to the Emergency Fund, Wolf was saved from any pain and suffering the cauliflower ear may have caused. Wolf's owner Nadine was very thankful as she loves old boy Wolf very much but couldn't afford the operation.
ALREADY IN SEPTEMBER, WE'VE HELPED 3 MORE CATS THROUGH THE AKI-HAH EMERGENCY FUND. MORE ABOUT THOSE IN OUR NEXT PROGRESS REPORT!

Kitzie at the vet's office in Windhoek
Kitzie at the vet's office in Windhoek
Boe Boe at the vet's office
Boe Boe at the vet's office
One of 7 kittens being sold on the street-safe now
One of 7 kittens being sold on the street-safe now
Glitter diagnosed, treated, home with his family
Glitter diagnosed, treated, home with his family
Snowy, leg stitched up
Snowy, leg stitched up
Wolf with a cauliflower ear
Wolf with a cauliflower ear

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Animal-Kind International

Location: Jemez Springs, New Mexico - USA
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Project Leader:
Karen Menczer
Director
Jemez Springs, New Mexico United States
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