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Build a future for children in a conflict zone

by Reach Out NGO
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone
Build a future for children in a conflict zone

Mah Di’s orphanage continues operating in the middle of the war and the COVID-19 crisis, and it is adapting to the new hygienic and health measures.

The Primary School remains functional. Most children are living in the orphanage, so there is not risk of outside transmission of COVID. Teachers respect hygenic measures at the beginning of each class.

However, the older children of the orphanage are no longer going to secondary school, for the last 3 months schools have stopped all over the country.

Students at Mah Di’s orphanage have taken up vocational training activities like hair-dressing, pastry-making, and sewing. This keeps the children busy and is a great means of acquiring skills out of the classroom. Mah Di’s Orphanage has also organized private mathematics classes and created a section for self-education of the students within the orphanage. These classes serve as revision forums and children help each other solve problems under the supervision of teachers and Mah Di. However, many different teachers are needed and there are not enough finances right now.

It is sad to note that the piggery was attacked by swine flu, and 25 pigs died. The two surviving pigs were sold and two new piglets of opposite sexes were bought to restart. The poultry farm is functioning,about 500 birds are being reared right now. A small extension of 30 birds was done. These are not for meat, but meant for producing eggs. The orphanage continues engaged in the cultivation of green vegetables for sale and consumption. Each new farming project is an opportunity for the children to learn valuable skills and get in touch with nature. 

Some well-wishers have donated foodstuff such as plantains, rice beans, biscuit, soybeans and juice to the orphanage, as well as cash.These donations have served as a complement to the food stock of the orphanage.

You might have noticed some changes in the project description. After reviewing the current needs of our supported social centers, we have agreed with them to focus on supporting their efforts to keep their children educated in this very difficult context of civil war. Most funds will be used to help the centers pay teachers’ salaries so education can continue even with their reduced resources.

Upcoming donations will be used to recruit private teachers for the children of secondary school level, so even if they are not going to school they can keep learning. We will also continue paying the primary school teachers with your support. 

 

Words from Mah Di:

Thank you for your continuous support, especially in paying the salaries of the primary school teachers and also for assisting us with daily bread in the midst of the pandemic and ongoing crisis.Thanks again and may God continue to bless ALL our donors.

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Souvenir, Father's House Orphanage
Souvenir, Father's House Orphanage
  1. Father’s House Orphanage

This orphanage continued to function during the last three months despite encountering a lot of challenges caused by the Anglophone crisis, as most of their partners have deserted them.  Life has not been very easy or stable for the kids but amidst the difficulties, they have been able to pull through by setting up income generating activities and receiving monthly donations from you. The kids have not been able to eat three times a day like before; they are able to eat twice due to limited resources.

The orphanage is involved in selling fresh fish to make ends meet. In December 2019, four cartoons of fish was bought at $30 and a profit of $110 was made. According to the Founder, the profit generated was used to buy food and clothes for the children during the festive period, and part for medication. The orphanage now rears pigs. So far, there are six pigs in the fence, and their plan is to sell after a certain period of time. There is also a small farm, which they cultivate and use the yield for home consumption. In December 2019, yams were harvested from the farm.

Thanks to your donation, four children have been sent to go to secondary school in the Littoral Region, where schools are functional. Those still in the orphanage have not had the opportunity to go to school since schools are not functioning in Muyuka.

Another major problem the orphanage encountered during the past months was the fact that 5 children were critically sick, and one operated upon. This made the Founder to spend more money than planned, but they are all healthy now.

Despite the challenges, Mrs Commy, the Founder of the Orphanage is thankful to God for keeping them alive, and her gratitude equally goes to you, the donors, for not forsaking them at a time like this.

Reach Out also directed a humanitarian partner, the Danish Refugee Council, to work with the Orphanage, and they made donations of some basic relief items.

 

2. A letter from Mah Di’s Orphanage

Dear donors we thank you so much for your donations that sustained us throughout 2019, and early 2020. We carried out the following activities during this period:

Education: the children successfully made it through the first term of the 2019/2020 academic year thanks to your financial, material and moral support.

Foodstuff: the Orphanage had enough for the children to eat, and we were also able to support other underprivileged people in our community.

Socialization & Outdoor Activities: the children celebrated the festive season in a grand style; they were engaged in preparing traditional dishes and visiting other children within the neighborhood. The children also visited the Kumba Amusement Park, as well as joint other orphanages under the canopy of the Meme Association of Orphanages to celebrate the end-of-year feast.

Visit to the Orphange: visitors came from within and out of Kumba with foodstuff like rice, beans, fish plantains and groundnut which they donated to the orphanage

Farming: the center successfully planted and harvested some food crops like cassava, plantain, yams and vegetables for consumption

Conclusion: we are so very thankful to the donors, who in one way or the other contributed to the upkeep of this orphanage.  God bless you abundantly

By Mah Diana, Founder of the Orphanage.

Ma Diana with the Children
Ma Diana with the Children
Children of Mah Di's Orphanage
Children of Mah Di's Orphanage
Children receiving gifts
Children receiving gifts
End-of-year party at Mah Di's Orphanage
End-of-year party at Mah Di's Orphanage
Children of Father's House Orphanage
Children of Father's House Orphanage
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Children happy with gifts donated by REO
Children happy with gifts donated by REO

Four staff from Reach Out NGO visited the Mah Di’s orphanage on Friday October 11, 2019. The aim of this visit was to donate basic household items and pay the school fees of some children. The following items were donated:

  • 30 cartons of soap each contain 48 tablets of Savon
  • 30 mosquito nets
  • 10 baby’s Poo pot
  • 10 drinking rubber cups
  • 25 20 L buckets.

When we arrived at the orphanage, most of the children were in class studying. The Founder and some of the smaller children and the class on break welcomed us by singing songs and some recited short poems for us. We were given the opportunity to visit the children in class and get to talk to them briefly on our mission to the orphanage and the usage of the items brought. ‘’We feel delighted to receive you today and we are very grateful for these items you have brought’’ said Joy, a 10-year old pupil. The project of the school is expanding with 65 children from the neighborhood enrolling to study there. “Thanks to the enrollment of other children from outside, the orphanage is able to meet its objective to carter for the less priviledged’’ said Mah Diana, the Founder. We then preceded to hand the items to the Founder and some of the younger children who were on a short break.

We were made to understand that the orphanage is now referred to as “Mah Di’s Center for Children in Distress”. Despite the successful running of the school, the orphanage is in need of support to adequately pay the staff monthly and funds to increase the number of staff from one teacher to two teachers per class. They also still need a lot of support to cater for the children in the community as the orphanage now assists a blind lady by name Bih and some vulnerable persons.

We were taken to the project sites and the number of pigs have reduced from 35 to 25 due to an epidemic but the founder said they are hopeful to sell the remaining pigs in December to make up for the lost encountered.

500 birds were bought in the poultry farm and within a short period, they were sold and more birds and feeds were bought. So far, the poultry farm is expanding and Charles, the oldest orphan, has taken complete charge over the farm ensuring that all goes well. The orphanage is one of the biggest suppliers of chicks in the neighbourhood.

Unfortunately, the orphanage had seven cows but some died before it could be sold, just about 4 were sold. According to the founder, they experienced some losses.

The bigger children are in charge of cultivating the vegetable farm which they sell when the market price is high and consume internally when the price is low.

These income generating activities still remain one of their biggest sources of livelihood. Particularly because given that with the on-going civil war visitors who use to donate gifts have reduced their visits. The founder was so happy and extended her gratitude to REO and its partners, and prays God to continue to bless the entire team for the endless support to see that the children are happy. She said thanks to the items donated, she will divert the money she could have used to buy the items to buy other necessities for the children

REO Staff With Orphanage Founder
REO Staff With Orphanage Founder
Handing of gifts to Orphanage Founder
Handing of gifts to Orphanage Founder
Poultry farming, an income generation activity
Poultry farming, an income generation activity
Livestock farming, key income generationg activity
Livestock farming, key income generationg activity
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Children of Mah Dis
Children of Mah Dis

REPORT ON MAH DI’S ORPHANAGE AND FATHER’S HOUSE ORPHANAGE.

Pictures belong to Mah Di´s Orphanage.

Context: For three years now, there has been a shutdown on schools in the South-West and North-West Regions of Cameroon. However, some schools continue, and both orphanages are struggling to home-school their children in a safe environment. That is why you can read this is one of the main concerns in both homes.

1. Mah Di’s Orphanage

Mah Di’s Orphanage has been very effective and functional within the last months. In July, they spent averagely about 600,000frs (about 1,000 $) for food, medication, staff cost, bills etc. The children were able to eat at least three times a day. During this holiday period, the children have been attending workshops on trades such as tailoring, welding, hairdressing and cooking, especially the bigger children. This practice keeps them busy and prepares them to manage their households in the future. Two female children who succeeded the Advanced Level General Certificate Examination (GCE A/Level) wrote competitive entrance examinations to enable them enter the public service.

As far as this up coming school-year is concerned, the founder has already put in place certain measures to enable all the children go to school for free. An extension of class five has been added at the school in the orphanage to accommodate all age groups, and six teachers hired for ten months to teach Primary school. The founder was able to apply to the Ministry of Social Affairs to take care of the school fees of the children in secondary school. They now need more benches in the class room to accommodate the growing population.

The orphanage is clearly still under pressure these days. The building is tight and cannot accommodate all the children. This is partly because of the absorption of some displaced children as a result of the war. There is thus, a need for expansion. Due to this tight space the hygienic condition of the orphanage is deteriorating from its standards. The current toilet cannot accommodate the growing population. Also, the children don’t have the space they need to feel free around the house.

Fishery, piggery, poultry, farming and animal husbandry remain their main sources of income. Within the month of July and August, they had a profit of 250,000 FRS only from the poultry. That same period, 25 pigs and piglets died as a result of an epidemic bringing some loses to the orphanage, just ten pigs survived, which is more than usual for an outbreak of the African Schwine Flu, and shows good livestock management.

The children have also engaged themselves in farming of vegetables, corn and other food crops. They use proceeds from these farming activities for their up-keep and part for home consumption.

The orphanage has a high need for mosquito nets at the moment. They equally need bed sheets, assistance to extend the orphanage building and general assistance to pay workers and running costs. Most of the children in the orphanage need pullovers especially as it rains much and it´s chilly this season.

The founder of the orphanage thanks the partners immensely for their continuous support and assistance to the orphanage and she prays the almighty God continues to bless you.

2. Father’s House Orphanage

Thanks to your support, this orphanage has been very functional in the past months. The children are able to eat three times a day, unlike before when they couldn’t afford three square meals. The orphanage is now involved in selling fresh fish to make ends meet. They buy fish for 42,000frs and sell for 58,000frs within a period of two weeks. The palm farm project which used to be one of their main sources of income has been discontinued since the rents expired and it was not renewed. The ongoing conflict makes it dangerous to go to the farm and the prices have dropped too. They are now engaged in the rearing of pigs which is a lucrative business in that community. The founder is positive with this piggery business and she believes that in the nearest future it will generate much income for the orphanage.

During this holiday period, the children have been involved in workshops and other training classes to keep themselves busy and occupied. As far as this new academic year is concern, the founder is very worried concerning the fate of the children due to the Anglophone crisis. She is worried on how the children will cope with the current threats against school resumption. But despite this fear, she promised to hire teachers that can teach the children at the orphanage. For those in secondary education, she promised to send them to areas where schools are going on. As compared to the previous months, the orphanage living standard has really increased. The hygienic conditions have improved as they are now able to afford toilet tissues, pads and other basic necessities. “I am very happy and comfortable now as compared to the other months, we are able to eat three times and sometimes even four times. My major problem now is the fear of not going to school but in case there is no school at all, I intend to do business in order to better my future. Thanks to you the donors we have a future to look up to’’ said Zebulan, one of the children.

However, the orphanage still faces challenges of lack of matrasses and other basic household items, they are hoping that well-wishers and donors like you will continue to reach out to them. Mrs. Commy, the Founder of the Orphanage is thankful to God for keeping them alive and her gratitude equally goes to REO which remains the lone local partner of the Orphanage, and to you, the donors for not giving up on them as others have.

children in tailoring workshop
children in tailoring workshop
Children at Welding workshop
Children at Welding workshop
children at hairdressing saloon
children at hairdressing saloon
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Baby Abigail
Baby Abigail

1. Mah Di’s Orphanage The Mah Di’s Orphanage was very effective and functional in the month of May. Within this month, they spent averagely 500,000frs (about 1,000 $) for food, medication, staff cost, bills etc. The children were able to eat four times a day. The school section was also operational from class one to four with plans to extend the school to class five by the next academic year. The orphanage also hired five teachers. Thanks to this initiative, most of the children in the orphanage are schooling except those who are below one year. They therefore, need more benches in the class room to accommodate the growing population. It should be noted that school is not going on in most of the South-West and North-West Regions due to the ongoing civil war. The orphanage is clearly under pressure these days. The building is tight and cannot accommodate all the children. This is partly because of the absorption of some displaced children between three months and 23 years old as a result of the war. There is thus, a need for expansion. Fishery, piggery, poultry, farming and animal husbandry remain their main sources of income. Within the month of May, they had a profit of 100,000 only from the piggery. The children have also engaged themselves in farming of cassava, corn and other food crops. They use proceeds from these farming activities for their up-keep. The orphanage has a high need for mosquito nets at the moment. They equally need kitchen utensils like pots, plates etc. Most of the children in the orphanage need pullovers especially as it rains much this season. This holiday period, the children are learning cooking, especially the bigger children. This practice keeps them busy and prepares them to manage their households in the future.

2. Father’s House Orphanage This orphanage was more functional in the month of May than the previous months. The kids ate three times a day, though sometimes food was not enough and they ended up eating twice during such days. The orphanage is now involved in selling yogurt to make ends needs. They spend 5000frs to produce the yogurt, which they sell at 10,000 making a 100% profit on the initial capital. They equally sell fish and palm oil, which helps in sustaining them. Due to the Anglophone crisis, the palm oil business has not been as lucrative as before. Sometimes sales are very low but this has not stopped the founder from working. “This palm oil business which Reach Out got for us is one of our main sources of income. Thanks to these palm oil, we are able to have some money for our up keep,” the Founder of the Orphanage testified. Due to the Anglophone crisis, children of Father’s House Orphanage have not been going to school. The situation persisted and the founder had to look for three teachers to come teach them at the orphanage, but the house is not currently able to pay them consistently. “I use to pay the teachers 20,000frs every month but they have stopped because this month I am not able to pay them again”. There are also shortages of basic commodities. Reach Out will keep working with your valuable donations to improve the situation of the orphanage. Mrs. Commy, the Founder of the Orphanage is thankful to God for keeping them alive and her gratitude equally goes to REO which remains the lone partner of the Orphanage, and to the donors for not giving up on them as others have.

Children and staff of Father's House
Children and staff of Father's House
Founder Welcomes Newest and Youngest Orphan
Founder Welcomes Newest and Youngest Orphan
Children pose with Founder during an event
Children pose with Founder during an event
Moki Victor
Moki Victor
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Organization Information

Reach Out NGO

Location: Buea, South West Region - Cameroon
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @reachoutdev1
Project Leader:
Njomo Omam Esther
Executive Director
Buea, South West Region Cameroon
$11,253 raised of $15,500 goal
 
209 donations
$4,247 to go
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