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 Education  Haiti Project #18806

Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training

by Little Footprints, Big Steps - IDO
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Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Self-Sufficient Haiti through Vocational Training
Sewing classes are underway!
Sewing classes are underway!

As a child, Fransnel spent most of his time on the streets, but with a dream in his heart and a goal of being able to go to school. He never gave up his dream.  His determination helps him live with a lot of discipline. Today he is a diligent student, in English tutoring, part of LFBS Youth Mentorship program and a photography apprentice! With all schools requiring uniforms, sewing is a terrific skill and future income generating opportunity. Sewing classes are underway!

While the construction work continues on Phase 1 LFBS Land Development project, crops planted on Phase 2 area yield a nice corn harvest! The agronomy students planned out the crop planting and we hired some of the families we work with to do the planting and maintenance! The harvest of the corn and peanuts will provide nutritious food for use at the Transitional Safehouses and nearby outreach families.

During the week before Christmas, in collaboration with Haitian Social Services (IBESR), the LFBS Outreach Team was able to:

-reunite 3 girls with their families! All of them had been in situations of mistreatment and domestic labour before coming to our Transitional Safehouse.
-reunite 2 boys who had been separated from their families;
-have employees briefed on the documentation process of children/youth in prison, and discuss the process of reunification of children in conflict with the law;
-distribute hygiene kits to nearly 40 youth in the children’s cell of the prison, and begin a dialogue with them to motivate them to make some changes in their lives;
-transfer 2 babies who had been abandoned in a hospital located several hours away, into foster families (although the trip to pick up these babies ended up taking nearly 12 hours due to road blocks and protests).
-bring 2 boys with bullet wounds to the hospital for bandaging, twice per week for each child.
-add to the Business Program for 5 parents who have been managing their businesses well, and integrate one new parent into the Business Start-up Program!... and that’s only part of what our small but dedicated team accomplished this week in collaboration with local authorities! In early 2020, we will follow-up with the newly reunited children to ensure they have access to education and potentially to integrate their parents in our Business Start-up Program.

Family structures are important – by strengthening families and empowering parents to care for their children, you are also empowering children…to be children and strive for the future. Please don’t underestimate the importance of community development, family preservation and family strengthening! Helping vulnerable families stay together and become more sustainable impacts their children’s mentality, life choices, self-perception, social engagement, and futures.

In early January, our staff facilitated an STI training for the children in the local prison, and provided the youth with a nutritious meal. There are over 30 children currently in the local prison, and all of them are in need of medical attention. Together with local authorities, we document each of the children with psychological, academic, and medical evaluations, and gather information about their families. Eventually we hope to trace their families and begin working towards a more successful reunification once they are liberated. We also hope to provide medical care to those who need it, although considering the conditions they are living in it will be difficult for them to be healthy while in prison. With your support, we would like to provide a meal for the children each day we spend with them as they are clearly not well fed in the prison, especially following the prolonged crisis the country recently endured and the resulting inflation.

Sharing information about the critical development aid issues, and the work being done by LFBS and our partners, having the chance for in-person discussions, meetings and connecting with people of all ages, and having LFBS Haitian staff there to share the stories and culture, is another important part of the mandate to increase awareness, understanding and capacity. LFBS Founder/Head of Operations and two Haitian staff traveled to Canada in January. While in Whitehorse, Toronto and Montreal, they met with students in schools, Universities, Sunday Schools; Service Club members; architects, Senator, Member of Parliament, and Board Directors; they presented and had discussions at community events, fundraisers, and at a Concordia University special event.

Examples of determination and tenacity … from Haiti to the Arctic! Nicolas has been a key employee with LFBS since 2013. While continuing his very demanding work with LFBS, studying and going to classes after a full work day, being a caring husband and father to two sons, he models leadership and motivation as he has graduates from Law School!

While far away in the frozen arctic, Dr. Russ Reinbolt, ER doctor from a San Diego hospital, undertakes the coldest and toughest Ultra Marathon in the world! During this grueling 300miles/483km run in temperatures as low as -37C, he has chosen to champion Little Footprints Big Steps Child Protection Organization! A documentary is being made of his training and run and he hopes that additional awareness will be brought to LFBS work.

Thank YOU for being the catalysts for the continued empowerment and opportunities for lasting change that you bring to so many!

Determined and excited photography apprentice!
Determined and excited photography apprentice!
Agronomy students oversaw crop planting
Agronomy students oversaw crop planting
Outreach staff & Medical Intern at Youth Prison
Outreach staff & Medical Intern at Youth Prison
Sharing at Rotary Clubs and community events
Sharing at Rotary Clubs and community events
Law School Graduation for LFBS staff member!
Law School Graduation for LFBS staff member!

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Sharing at World Summit in England
Sharing at World Summit in England

As you hear reports about the current situation in Haiti today, it’s important to remember that the massive unrest in the streets is not powered by emotion only. The people you see out there are not thoughtless and they’re not simply angry. There is a logic to what’s happening; there’s a history and so many reasons why. There is need and desperation, definitely. But implicit in what’s happening is a rejection of a long-standing system—and a dream of what another Haiti could look like. And, DID look like!

Once known as the ‘Pearl of the Caribbean’, sadly, for many decades Haiti has become known as the ‘poorest country in the Western Hemisphere’.

Remember, Haiti has always been a leader in seismic shifts in how the world functions. Their revolution of 1791–1804 that ensured that slave capitalism would eventually be doomed all over the planet. They became the first black republic in the world. They were the 'Pearl of the Caribbean', a thriving free country. They eventually ended up almost being taken over but chose to buy back their own freedom from France for the sum of (today's funds) $21 BILLION. This was to cover the cost of the income generated by the slaves and the properties the whites were relinquishing back to the Haitians. It took Haiti 122 years to pay this debt - but they did it!

In 1929, they became the first nation to cast off an American military occupation. Besides frustration about infinite corruption and zero leadership in Haiti, there is a lot of thinking now about how the country might survive outside globalized markets, and how it could return to an agricultural system of updated, self-sufficient small farming. Changes like these take a long time to accomplish, and require the support of huge majorities willing to work for these goals and other changes. It’s a demanding job, to tire out an enemy who has every advantage. But it can be done—and has been done before in Haiti. 

Over the past several months there has been no electricity, no fuel, no access to food, water, supplies. Schools, businesses, markets, even hospitals have closed down. Red Cross has temporarily closed down locations outside of the capital city (Port au Prince). Terres des Hommes Organization will be leaving Haiti at the end of the year. Inflation has quadrupled the cost of even the most basic survival items. Most of the country is on lock down or rioting. In a country where the majority of people feed their families with the income generated from day to day market selling, this instability causes even more suffering.

DESPITE THIS, your Little Footprints Big Steps team has continued doing all that we can: in collaboration with local authorities we continue to reunite children. Our staff have ensured that school supplies are ready to go for our students as soon as school opens up again. Backpacks provided by Move to Matter have been distributed where possible. On a day when the entire country was on lockdown, our nurse travelled by foot across fire-lit road blocks to ensure that a young man could have medical attention. Another day several children were accompanied to a medical clinic including two with broken bones; we were able to make a trip to visit to some of the families in the countryside to bring them food supplies and ensure their children are ready for school (school is open in the countryside!); construction on our property was able to continue. We have temporarily moved several children from extremely dangerous areas of town into our Transitional Safehouses. Daily tutoring sessions are taking place at the Transitional Safehouses. As much as possible, LFBS staff continue to heroically work, despite the danger, difficulties and heavy rains. On calm days we have been able to purchase supplies for our Transitional Safehouses and Outreach families. The level of commitment of the LFBS staff is remarkable!

What else can we do? We focus on doing all that we can do now, while planning for what we will do as soon as we are able. Please don’t look at the current crisis in Haiti and write off the country as incapable of progress. Instead look at the faces of the children, parents and staff wishing for hope, working for positive change, and praying for peace in their country. We can’t give up on the future. We can’t give up on all of the parents who’ve worked endlessly with the single goal of providing for their families. We can’t give up on the staff members who leave their own families and risk their own lives to come to work even if given the day off, because they so badly want their country to continue moving forward. Right now is when they need us most. They are people just like you, but living in a seemingly impossible situation, and never giving up hope. When the situation becomes more challenging, it means we need to try harder, do better, and become stronger.

 We are SO proud of Little Footprints, Big Steps’ continuous, unrelenting response and enthusiastic dedication. Heros, each and every one....as are all of you that are catalysts for the continued good work and positive impacts... that ARE possible despite this situation. YOU make a difference. In the staff meetings, they think of your care and love and concern. YOU help them stand with compassion and strength, to face each new adversity, to plan for the next steps and to share joys and hopes.

What else do you make possible? On most days, sounds of rioting and gun fire can be heard. On one of those days, Haiti Social Services called us about a 15 year old who had 8 bullets pass through his legs. They requested LFBS assistance. His family could not afford the necessary surgery, medicine, IV fluids, bandaging – or even the food and water.

Here is the account from LFBS’ Head of Haiti Operations when she entered the hospital that was still marginally open: “I could immediately identify the patient. He was a small boy for his age, laying on a hospital bed with both of his legs completely bandaged and spread in front of him. A small, elderly woman sat beside his bed. I’d thought it was his mother but through conversation discovered that it was his grandmother – his mother was out trying to generate an income for the day so she could bring him a meal. 

“What does your mother do?” I asked the boy. “She sells boiled eggs,” he said as tears welled in his eyes and the teenager started to cry. I struggled to hold back my own tears as I slowly held his hand. It is a fairly common business to sell bananas and boiled eggs each morning – yet not something that generates a lot of income. It was about 1pm when I visited him and he hadn’t eaten yet.

He explained to me how he’d been shot: he was working on a public vehicle, recruiting passengers. He was doing this so that he could help his mother pay rent. As the vehicle was returning to Les Cayes, they came across a road block. The driver tried to cross the road block. People who had set up the road block angrily began shooting – and the 15 year old boy, who had gotten off of the truck and was standing on the side of the road, ended up with 8 bullets passing through his legs. The driver dropped him off at the hospital and somehow his mother was informed that he was there.

Yellow liquid seeped through the bandaging on his legs. One leg had received 6 bullets while the other had been hit by 2 bullets. Although he felt pain in both legs, he couldn’t move his toes on the leg that had been more badly damaged.

“Do you feel afraid?” I asked the boy. He nodded. He described having nightmares, and waking up afraid on his hospital bed. His mother can’t even stay at the hospital with him as what she earns during the day is what allows her to feed him. He told me that once he heals, he wants to go live with his father in the countryside – he was so scarred that he didn’t want to live in the city any longer.

Working with Haiti Social Services (IBESR), we will try to ensure that this child gets the medical care, nutrition and support that he needs – however with Red Cross closed, blood transfusions are not even available. We will also try to ensure he receives psychological support and assistance to empower them in the long run.”

In the midst of these challenging times, an amazing milestone event! Eluxon is currently a valued and dedicated employee of the LFBS team. But, in 2011, he was one of the youth we supported in escaping life in a corrupt orphanage which denied him of many of his rights throughout 12 years of his childhood! Eluxon’s work now involves reuniting families and working with other children/youth from similar situations. In October, he traveled to London, England with LUMOS Organization to participate in the One Young World Summit. He spoke, on stage, about the damage orphanages do. We are SO incredibly proud of him and grateful he is being empowered to share his story! The One Young World Summit focused on ending corrupt orphanages, and the volunteering that further damages children around the world. Here he is on stage beside LUMOS founder and Harrry Potter series author, JK Rowling!

Please continue to look past the chaos and violence highlighted in the news or images of Haiti, and see the vulnerable individuals who are being so deeply impacted by their country’s situation as they struggle to meet their families’ basic needs from day to day. We can make a life-changing difference for them, and now they need support more than ever. Thank you for all you make possible! 

 

Reunited after 12 years!
Reunited after 12 years!
School backpacks are distributed
School backpacks are distributed
Construction project continues
Construction project continues
Homeschooling during lockdown
Homeschooling during lockdown

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Masonry Apprentice
Masonry Apprentice

AS you have seen in each activity Report - and on our Facebook page (Little Footprints, Big Steps) if you also follow us there - our staff, our Programs, the challenges and the stunning developments are always in motion. Momentum through the strength and support you are such a huge part of. Summer of 2019 has been no exception. Each day – and often night – filled with little footprints that lead toward the big steps

IN July Wathson was recognized for his continued diligence. Who is this young man? He is an enthusiastic, dedicated young man who works hard to improve his living conditions. He is the only child in a single-parent family. His mother has passed away and he lives with his elderly dad. Although he was only able to start school a few years ago when LFBS entered his life, he is now in 9th grade. Since the first day we provided him with the opportunity for education, Wathson has succeeded in his school work and exams, despite the fact that he has to walk more than 2 kilometers, down a mountainside for part of the way, to get to his school. He has also taken vocational training in window installation and is currently studying tailoring. He tends to his garden crops in his small mountainous community and is a great vetivert grower. The LFBS staff member guiding the Youth Leader group is creating a contract with each youth moving them toward a more independence and personal accountability.

MEDICAL care is a critical, basic need. July was a busy month for surgeries. In just a few weeks time, over 6 children had surgery – including a child with multiple physical handicaps one having a bullet removed! Our 3 medical students are back in Les Cayes for the summer and one is assisting LFBS at the hospital.

EARLY in the summer months we started having school uniforms made for the coming school year! We have 4 students in vocational sewing classes this summer. When we are able to purchase sewing machines, we will be able to hire our own youth and family members to make school uniforms in future and add that into the Small Business Program! Other youth are attending vocational training and apprenticeships, including learning masonry work and photography/videography – future LFBS activity Updates will include photos that young man has taken! We were able to hire some of our youth and family during summer construction projects including the Phase 1 security wall on our land and house building for one of youth and his family.

SUMMERTIME learning opportunities also included taking a number of Agronomy students and LFBS youth leaders to the Haven Foundation’s Agriculture Training Center. A wonderful opportunity to learn and be inspired! The agronomy students we are assisting with their University courses are creating a plan for the planting and harvesting of crops on the LFBS land that is not under construction. They will be implementing the plan and looking after the crops. Work experience and continued growth in action!

LFBS’ Head of Haiti Operations participated in a workshop held by the National Committee against Child Domesticity (Comite National de Luttee Contre le Travail des Enfants). A national plan is being prepared to raise awareness about laws surrounding child labour in Haiti, and the Committee is currently reaching each region of the country to gain input for that plan! LFBS staff and Operation’s Head also participated in a workshop facilitated by Bethany International focused on the need to support families to be, and remain, together in including various methods of doing this. LFBS was able to provide examples of successful reunification and steps toward family strengthening and measures toward healthy independence. The participants will meet again in December to discuss the progress, challenges and successes they have had.

A YOUNG man asked to talk with Morgan, LFBS founder and Head of Haiti Operations. He is a former street boy we've recently supported to begin an apprenticeship. He's previously not had a very easy life, already has a child, and has spent a day in prison. "I've been wanting to speak with you to say thank you," he told her, "because I'm starting to see myself differently. I can see myself having a different future." THIS is the reality you make possible!

MEMBERS of our Outreach staff traveled to rural Jeremie and held a training session for a group of parents and youth in the far southwest Grande Anse Region on Family Planning and assisted the parents currently in our Business Start-up program reinforce their businesses. Along with assisting with a workshop and bringing important supplies, they also began detailing preparations for school uniforms and supplies for the upcoming school year! What an incredible, hard-working team - so much is accomplished each day!

PLEASE share this Update with your friends and let us know if you have any questions. THANK YOU SO MUCH for all that you make possible. “Sometimes the right path is not the easiest one”. Thank you for being a catalyst in this journey of challenge, discovery and transformation. 

Learning Tailor Skills
Learning Tailor Skills
Agronomy Training
Agronomy Training
Changing Child Labor Laws
Changing Child Labor Laws
Empowered Women in Business Program
Empowered Women in Business Program
Youth Are Development
Youth Are Development

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Vocational Graduation Congratulations!
Vocational Graduation Congratulations!

Since the time that Little Footprints, Big Steps rescued this young woman from the corrupt orphanage she had been in since she was a child, and reunited her with her family, she has continuously shown how brave, bright and determined she is. She worked hard to successfully catch up on the basic education she had been denied. And then diligently pursued the opportunity of specialized training.  She has just graduated from Cosmetology School.

Monthly, our Youth Leader Group recognizes the amazing work and attitude of a youth as they make strides on their path forward to becoming leaders and role models in their communities! Our Youth Leader Group meets regularly for guided discussions on values and attitudes; workshops on health and life skills and various volunteering options to learn empathy and confidence. Thank you for making these Big Steps a possibility!

There are currently 174 individuals involved with our Business Start-Up Program, many of them single mother heads of household. This empowering program helps keep families together and provides the foundation for a healthy, self-sufficient future. Through our collaboration with Haven Organization, they provide the Business Start-Up training in the LFBS office/training location. A new partnership with Trees That Feed – will allow families in rural areas to receive mango, coconut, avocado, breadfruit and apricot trees, adding to their ability to both consume, and market, healthy food supplies for their families and communities. We have been able to expand this program to include youth and parents in the remote and rural regions of Haiti's south. Amazing.Through collaborations we can have an even greater impact!

As part of International Day of the Child activities each year, we host an annual Street Child Consultation. The Haiti Police Child Protection Brigade, Haiti Social Services (IBESR), Terre des Hommes, and other partners all join together to help LFBS facilitate this unique initiative. This year's theme was: "Let's talk! Each of our actions count!" FOUR youth that are in LFBS programs gave inspirational talks. One of those youth, having the confidence and motivation to share, was previously a street child as well - but no one would know it now! The youth attending were extremely engaged and ALL of them were motivated to return home/to school! Despite the civil unrest taking place in early June, we started to follow up with the children from that meeting. One of the young men at the meeting immediately returned to live with his aunt in the countryside and is very motivated to change his own life!

 On the LFBS Land Development project – totally separate from the ongoing core LFBS work - completion of the bridge and construction of the retaining wall at the LFBS work site continues and has provided employment for up to 73 local people, and a learning opportunity for a group of University students studying Civil Engineering who undertook a site visit!

 Creating and nurturing key partnerships and increasing awareness also takes place outside of Haiti. In May, Morgan Wienberg, LFBS co-founder and Head of Haiti Operations was the keynote speaker for the Canadian Association of Principals Conference. Following her hour long address, that connected to the theme of the Conference, Authentic Learning, over 100 principals from schools across Canada were inspired to bring Morgan and LFBS story to their schools, teachers and students when they return to their homes. 

 The Northern Institute of Social Justice hosted an interesting and intimate event at the Yukon College. Families and people of all ages were engrossed with the Question/Answer time with Morgan. Her inspiring and informative talks and discussions during her time in Canada included Rotary Clubs, High Schools, media interviews, FH Collins Social Justice Club and Northern Council for Global Cooperation Annual General Meeting. She also was the Inspirational Speaker at a 2019 Graduation Ceremony, bringing tears and motivation to students and parents alike. These are all opportunities to create awareness of situations and progress, share best practices and insights, and deliver heartfelt gratitude to the people and partners who have continued to be with us through caring, interest and financial contribution since the beginning of our work in Haiti! Collaboration and partnership once again making the difference.

In late May, we received exciting news from the film production company. Although filming and production which has been on-going for the past 5 years, is still underway, they have released the title and official movie trailer: NOT ABOUT ME https://notaboutmefilm.com

Partnerships. Collaborations. People being catalysts for people. Working together. Many examples are demonstrated in this update, many others included in previous reports. Thank you for continuing to build futures and lasting change with us!  Thoughts about how you, your Company, School, Organization, Business could participate? Let’s talk!

Small Business Opportunity
Small Business Opportunity
Motivated and Confident!
Motivated and Confident!
Principal's Association Conference Keynote
Principal's Association Conference Keynote
University Engineering students learning
University Engineering students learning
A strong team makes the difference!
A strong team makes the difference!

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Graduating from Vocational training!
Graduating from Vocational training!

As school children and youth begin preparing for their exams to finish off this school year, we can see many milestones accomplished. Some students have done so well this year that they will not be required to write the final exams! Some of the children we have recently reunited with their families are undergoing special tutoring so that they will be able to go to school next year - what a new life they have to look forward to. Tutoring will continue through the summer months for many students to ensure they can continue to gain confidence and skills. Vocational skills training will also take place during the summer months for some of those enthusiastic youth! Those that have already completed vocational skills training will have an opportunity to use those new skills - and have their first employment experience - as we begin building  on the LFBS land development project! 

 The medical students we are supporting were excited to share their first term results – all were in the 70% range! So fantastic – and we were able to provide them with laptops to ensure their ability to be successful as they progress toward their medical careers! One of the agronomy students we sponsor has been able to go on field trips to other parts of the country to study and apply his learning in a practical way, another works with us on our family outreach and on our land – their enthusiasm growing along with their skills and knowledge.

Supplies not easily attainable in Haiti, come to us in many ways...including by sailboat! Wonderful supporters throughout the US brought supplies to docks along the eastern coast as sailboat Tandemeer loaded up at ports heading southward to Haiti. Boxes of backpacks for school (thanks to Move to Matter Organization), cases of UBSuperfood nutritional powder (thanks to UBSuper), medical supplies and even bicycles to provide transportation to and from school or work arrived at the dock! 

Sharing our model for programs and initiatives, and advocating for Children's Rights and concrete changes across the country is part of the critical lasting impacts that LFBS is involved with. Morgan Wienberg, LFBS Co-founder and Head of Haiti Operations was an invited participant in a three day National Workshop on the Reform of the Child Care System. Government officials from all regions of the country, as well as other Child Protection Actors, gathered to learn more about the process of reformation of child care systems. They discussed the goal of deinstitutionalisation (DI) as being so much more than simply closing orphanages: it is the development of family and community based solutions to child protection issues. During the workshop – facilitated by Haitian Social Services (IBESR) and UNICEF – they began brainstorming a long term plan for working towards DI in Haiti. Key information provided included: over 27 000 children currently in institutions; 80/90% of children in orphanages are NOT real orphans and have families; of 754 orphanages evaluated in the country, only 30 have been approved and have minimum standards of care; even those orphanages which have been approved, IBESR would like to have transformed into transitional centres and/or foster homes. IBESR requests that no more than 30% of funding goes to institutions, while at least 70% of funds is invested in community or family solutions. Morgan has also been invited to provide input to the "Report of the UN Secretary General on the Status of the Convention on the Rights of the Child 2019".

One of the film crew members that was in Haiti in the late fall released a newsletter sharing some of his fantastic photos of LFBS staff, family and the surrounding area, as well as some of his insights from his time with us. Here is the link to that document: https://www.gbpcreative.ca/blog/2019/1/8/haiti?fbclid=IwAR29sR7tfNCQPkVD0T_ZCEQtWD7ovyBAWm84SWCqsS6f6QUx6XufbSyXtEM

Some of you may have followed the media coverage of tHaiti's country-wide demonstrations and escalating riots that took place in February. And wondered what it was really all about. Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. With the majority of the people already living in extreme poverty - additional crippling inflation (Haitian currency lost 40% of its value), astronomical fuel and food prices, further disregard for human rights, fragile political processes erupted into prolonged demonstrations and rioting in early February. Imagine if you made $2/day to look after your family’s needs, and it cost $12 to purchase just a gallon of cooking oil!

 And, you may have seen the media coverage of NGOs and volunteers fleeing the country. LFBS Head of Haiti Operations, remained steadfast in Haiti, leading her staff, planning for the future and providing stability and hope for the children and families that LFBS works with. Standing strong with determination and commitment sent a tremendously strong message to all and allowed us to be immediately impactful and responsive once it was safe to do so. Leadership and commitment looks like that. Here is a link to CBC TV National News interview: https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1446119491894

Strengthening families means that parents also have learning sessions - on Child and Women's Rights, on health prevention, on family planning...AND for our small business start-up program! We collaborate with Haven Organization for the training portion of this initiative. Opportunity for empowerment and independance, setting examples for their children and community, and keeping families whole and healthy. To date, we have close to 100 participants in this life-changing program! 

YOU are the catalyst that mobilizes the constant determination and commitment from our staff, leaders, children and families into action! Thank you so much

Bridge construction on LFBS land - and jobs!
Bridge construction on LFBS land - and jobs!
English tutoring can mean job opportunities
English tutoring can mean job opportunities
MORE parents in Business StartUp training!
MORE parents in Business StartUp training!
When supplies arrive by sailboat!
When supplies arrive by sailboat!
LFBS is a leader in Anti-Trafficking Reform
LFBS is a leader in Anti-Trafficking Reform

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Little Footprints, Big Steps - IDO

Location: Whitehorse, Yukon - Canada
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Twitter: @Little Footprints, Big Steps
Project Leader:
Karen Wienberg
Whitehorse, YT Canada
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