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 Animals  Israel Project #19243

Help Save the Sumatran Tiger

by The Tisch Family Zoological Gardens, the Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Help Save the Sumatran Tiger
Photo: Uriel Nori
Photo: Uriel Nori

Tigers in the wild, especially on hot days, often go into pools or streams to play and cool off. They usually only enter with half their body.

As part of the enrichment activities that the carnivore keepers prepare for the tigers, they brought to the exhibit a "nomad ball": a ball that had been moved through a number of different exhibits at the Zoo and had absorbed the smell of different animals.

Avigdor and Hannah were delighted by the new addition and played in the water with the ball for much longer that the keepers had expected.

This activity encourages territory marking as well an water entry and interaction between the two tigers.

Keep warm!

Rachael and the Tiger Team

Photo: Uriel Nori
Photo: Uriel Nori
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Resting in the summer heat
Resting in the summer heat

The busy summer season has passed with large numbers of visitors enjoying their visit to the Zoo. 

The Tiger Exhibit is one of the larger and more popular exhibits. It consists of a shaded tunnel with a large window to the tigers' pool, several large viewing windows as well as an upstairs viewing platform.

Lately Hannah, much to the delight of the visitors who make the effort to go up the stairs to the platform, has taken to napping immediately opposite the viewing platform's window.

Plans are afoot to refurbish the tigers' pool and to replace its filter and pumping system to increase the water quality and hopefully encourage the tigers to take a dip more often.

As for Hannah's much expected pregnancy... no news yet and the latest forecast from Binyamin, the chief carnivore keeper, is a delivery at the start of October. Not long now!!

Have a lovely fall, 

Rachael and the Tiger Team!

Tiger stripes
Tiger stripes
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Photo: Tamari
Photo: Tamari

Shalom Tiger lovers, 

As we reported last time, Hannah the tigeress was pregnant agiain.

She gave birth during Passover to a single cub, who again did not survive.

Hannah and her partner, Avigdor, are expecting again and we are hoping to see a birth at the beginning of September.

As we explained in our last report, it has been decided that if she gives birth to more than one cub - tigers usually have 2-4 offspring in each birth - this time they will be taken away from the parents and hand-reared by the dedicated keepers at the Zoo.

This is because of the critically endangered status of the Sumatran tigers - we cannot afford to lose any more offspring.

So let's keep our fingers crossed this time and hope that we will be able to share with you some cute baby tiger cub pictures in our next report.

Have a safe Summer!

Rachael and the Tiger Team

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Dear Sumatran tiger supporters,

Since we last reported to you, we have waited with baited breath to see whether Hannah, our tigress, was pregnant – and the good news is that she is! We are expecting a tiger birth next month…so, everyone please send positive thoughts our way!

During the pregnancy, we have that she received the best nutrition and enrichment; weighed her once a week and took photographs with a special thermo-camera to monitor her health.

As you know, only 1 of Hannah’s cubs has survived over the years, despite the fact that she has had several. Accordingly, a decision has been taken in consultation with the European Endangered Species Program coordinator to hand rear any cubs that survive for more than 24 hours. Sumatran tigers are critically endangered and so we cannot afford to lose any more offspring.

Look out for our next report, hopefully it will contain the news we so wish for.

With warm regards,

Team Tiger at the Jerusalem Zoo

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Thermo imaging of Hannah our female tigress
Thermo imaging of Hannah our female tigress

Dear Sumatran tiger supporters,

Since we last reported to you, we have continued to monitor Hannah’s pregnancy. According to our calculations, she should be due towards the end of February/beginning of March 2019.

In the meantime, we are ensuring that she receives the best nutrition and enrichment; and are weighing her once a week as well as taking photographs with a special thermo-camera to monitor her health.

Thermo imaging is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that allows the examiner to visualize and quantify changes in skin surface temperature. An infrared scanning device is used to convert infrared radiation emitted from the skin surface into electrical impulses that are visualized in color on a monitor. This visual image graphically maps the body temperature and is referred to as a thermogram. The spectrum of colors indicate an increase or decrease in the amount of infrared radiation being emitted from the body surface. Since there is a high degree of thermal symmetry in the normal body, subtle abnormal temperature asymmetry's can be easily identified.

This method’s major clinical value is in its high sensitivity to pathology in the vascular, muscular, neural and skeletal systems and as such can contribute to the pathogenesis and diagnosis made by the clinician. For example:

-       To define the extent of a lesion of which a diagnosis has previously been made;

-       To localize an abnormal area not previously identified, so further diagnostic tests can be performed;

-       To detect early lesions before they are clinically evident;

-       To monitor the healing process.

We hope that we will have more good news to report next time - we’ll keep you posted!

With warm regards,

Team Tiger at the Jerusalem Zoo

Thermo imaging of hindquarters
Thermo imaging of hindquarters
Thermal imaging of underbelly
Thermal imaging of underbelly
Thermal imaging of tiger with keeper
Thermal imaging of tiger with keeper
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Organization Information

The Tisch Family Zoological Gardens, the Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem

Location: Jerusalem, Israel - Israel
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @BiblicalZoo
Project Leader:
Nicole Wexler
Jerusalem, Israel
$5,647 raised of $10,000 goal
 
160 donations
$4,353 to go
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