Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef

by Fondo Mexicano para la Conservacion de la Naturaleza, A.C.
Play Video
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Help Local Leaders Save the Mesoamerican Reef
Jun 9, 2017

MAR Leadership 2017 First Semester Report

2016 cohort during 2nd workshop
2016 cohort during 2nd workshop

Dear friends, partners and followers,

It is with great pleasure that we share with you our latest news!

This first half of 2017 have been very busy for MAR Leadership with 2 workshops, one webinar, one Summit and many more! Let’s find out:

Second and third workshops of the 2016 cohort on Blue Economy:

The second workshop of the 2016 cohort, designing projects to promote the Blue Economy model, took place in Tela, Honduras. Eda Roth, actress and coach shared techniques of public speaking and how to speak with the media. Her training was intense, as she led them to overcome their fears and get out of their comfort zone. Fellows were impressed by the feedback they received during the presentation exercises and were convinced of the progress they made thanks to her.

Kim Bonine, Aaron Brunner and Angela Mojica of Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) trained Fellows in the Economic Valuation tool. Economic valuation tool studies the monetary value of the benefit of an environmental service from the point of view of human welfare, the intrinsic value of an ecosystem being intangible. Learn more and read their blog entry about the workshop.
Ángela Mojica, 2012 Fellow, presented a case study of economic valuation in Cozumel. Aaron Brunner and his colleagues gave feedback to Fellows who will apply this economic tool in their projects: among them are Adrian Villegas, Milton Alvarado and Alejandro López. Five honduran Fellows from other cohorts also participated in this training.

Nombre de Dios National Park was the site selected for the field trip. Milton Alvarado, Fellow from Honduras presented his project. The group met with the comanagers of the park, who presented their payment for ecosystems services project as well as the details of the financing mechanism implemented. Some of the funds collected through the payment for fresh water service are being used for the development and maintenance of the tourism infrastructure in Laguna Cacao which Fellows were able to visit on the Park's boats.

The third section of the workshop was dedicated to the design of a communication strategy for effective advocacy by Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide (ELAW) mentors Lori Maddox and Alejandra Serrano. Through practical exercises and case studies, Fellows analyzed the different crucial stages of a communication campaign and then designed the advocacy campaign for their own projects. Laura Palmese and Cindy Flores of the 2014 cohort presented an environmental activism campaign in Honduras that was well received by their peers. 

Fellows met again in May at Livingston, Caribbean Guatemala for their cohort’s third workshop. MAR Leadership team trained Fellows on how to effectively design projects for impact conservation following the steps of MAR Leadership manual. The Fellows carried out the situational analysis of their own projects, their theory of change as well as the results chain necessary to achieve their objectives. They identified their key stakeholders and started a strategy to involve them.

Alfonso Malky of the Conservation Strategy Fund, mentor of the 2016 generation, spent the first two days of the week training, dynamically and interactively, with a variety of examples, exercises and case studies on the basics of Cost Benefit Analysis. Fellows learned how to design cash flows in order to analyze the costs and benefits of a project from the different perspectives: financial, economic and fiscal. Alfonso demonstrated, as a detailed analysis of the different approaches could identify from financial or environmental problems to social conflicts possibly generated by a poorly designed project. A CBA makes it possible to define whether a project is profitable or convenient for different sectors of society and thus avoid serious losses. The Fellows, Alejandra, John, Areli, Michelle and Juan planning on using of CBA tool presented their projects and received valuable feedback, advice and recommendations from Alfonso, the MARL team and their peers.

An interesting videoconference with Dr Ottoniel Monterroso, Rafael Landivar University, familiarized the Fellows with a case of study using economic tools for the implementation of a biological connectivity reserve and the design of an environmental services payment mechanism in Guatemala. The group had the opportunity to meet Puerto Barrios, where the project of Michelle Villatoro takes place. Representatives of DVG Services and Control of Industrial Spills, S.A. presented the different ways to deal with spill accidents that can occur in ports and coasts. They highlighted the vulnerability of our region and ecosystems to these types of accidents and the lack of response capacity of our countries.

The third phase of the workshop focused on the power of narrative for strategic communication with Mariana Mendoza of the Center for Story-based Strategy. Through videos, exercises and dynamics, the Fellows were able to analyze the different elements of a story, to observe how the assumptions and perspectives of the audience could influence the way of telling a story. Mariana showed them the different tools used by CSS from the analysis of the narrative, the dramatic triangle and the points of intervention. Lori Maddox enriched the presentations with a case study of communication campaign for indigenous rights in Belize. Fellows were able to familiarize themselves with the techniques of narrative and reflected on the assumptions, the actors, the frames and the images that their own projects needed to address.

Guatemalan Fellows Cleopatra Méndez, Blanca Rosa García, José Domingo Caal, Cesar Zacarías and Guillermo Galvez joined the group and exchanged experiences, strengthening the MAR leadership network.

 

Cost Benefit Analyzes Webinar

On Tuesday, March 28th, we organized an online seminar about cost-benefit analyzes for marine ecosystem conservation. Nicolas Pascal, project director of the organization Blue Finance, an expert in environmental finance, extensively described this economic tool to the Fellows. Multiple case studies from the MAR region illustrated his dynamic presentation. Afterwards, Nicolas answered the numerous questions of the Fellows. You can access the webinar recording here

Sustainable and Social Tourism Summit

2010 Fellow Vicente Ferreyra from Mexico and his consulting firm for Sustainable Tourism, Sustentur, continue to grow and generate positive impacts in the tourism industry not only in Quintana Roo but also internationally. Thus, within the framework of the Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development declared by the United Nations, Vicente has organized the 2017 Sustainable and Social Tourism Summit in Cancún. 

The event was supported by Mexico's Tourism Ministry (Sectur), the Mexico Tourism Promotion Council (CPTM), the Quintana Roo Tourism Secretariat (Sedetur), the Cancun Visitors and Conventions Bureau (OVC), as well as the organizations EarthCheck and the International Organization of Social Tourism.
From May, 4th to 6th, the Sustainable & Social Tourism Summit has been a space for meeting and reference in the world for the dissemination, updating and exchange of knowledge on the topics of sustainability, solidarity and social responsibility in tourism. International leaders in responsible tourism industry, governments and organizations will present trends, news and case studies to be replicated in the world. The Summit attended 3 main themes: Tourism for Development, Tourism and Social Equity, and Tourism and Natural Capital. Aside, was also held the 8th Sustainable Tourism Exhibit: a space dedicated to promoting actions, products and services that seek the construction of a sustainable and socially responsible tourism.

Fellows for sustainable fisheries in the Mesoamerican Reef

The Wildlife Conservation Society-Belize, with MAR Fellows Ralna Lewis (2015) and Julio Maaz (2016), in partnership with Leonel Requena (2012) from the UNDvpmt Fund- Small Grant Program, Adriel Castañeda (2012) and Isabel Martínez (2016) from the Belize Fisheries Department hosted a Fisheries Forum on 21 and 22 april, at the Glovers reef research station. Attendees for the forum included Sarteneja Fishermen Association, Hopkins FA and Chunox FA. The objective was to provide an avenue for the exchange of information among fishers and managers. Topics discussed included benefits of MPAs, fisheries regulations, project of fisheries replenishment zones, managed access and the role of fishers associations in fisheries management.

The discussions were rich and fruitful. In conclusion, it was recognized that there is a need for continued and effective communication among all parties, in order to ensure the protection of the fishing industry and Belize’s marine resources.

Julio Maaz, is an expert on small-scale sustainable fisheries at WCS. He shared his knowledge on the Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tool or SMART with the MAR Leadership network in Honduras. 
At the beginning of the year, Julio and several Honduran MAR Fellows such as Diana Vasquez (Centro de Estudios Marinos), Ian Drysdale (2010, Healthy Reefs Initiative), Jenny Myton (2010, CORAL), Pamela Ortega (2012, CORAL) and Cindy Flores 2014, (Instituto de Conservación Forestal) organized a workshop for the use of SMART for fisheries management. SMART, is an open source application developed by WCS and other partners to collect, store, communicate and evaluate data collected by park rangers during their patrols. This innovative management tool seeks to help in the fight against illegal activities that endanger natural resources. This workshop complements the recent exchange of experiences between Belize and Honduras with Isabel Martinez from the Belize Fisheries Department on the national fisheries management program based on Managed Access rights.

In Mexico, Kim Ley Cooper, 2011 Fellow and his organization Colectividad Razonatura A.C., committed to the sustainable use of coastal marine resources, started a project with the Slow Food network: Slow Fish in the Caribbean.
Slow Food is an organization that unites the pleasure of good food with a commitment to local communities and the environment. It seeks to counteract the rise of fast food and prevent the disappearance of local gastronomic traditions. Slow Fish in the Caribbean, funded by the European Union, has as its main objective the protection of marine biodiversity and the development of sustainable use models of food resources in protected areas. The enthusiastic Slow Fish network seeks to enhance traditional knowledge and strengthen the technical and administrative skills of local communities, helping them to improve natural resource management and diversify productive activities. Kim participates in the project with the lobster fishing cooperatives of the Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve and the Banco Chinchorro Biosphere Reserve to carry out training activities around different topics, including integrated management of marine resources, alternative economic activities to fishing and the creation of monitoring systems.

Hondurean 2012 Fellow Mariela Ochoa from Center for Marine Studies has been invited to participate at the international event "Slow Fish Caribe 2017: La rete siamo noi (The network is us)" which took place in the Old Port of Genoa, Italy. Her talk "Contributing to Improve the Management of Coastal Marine Resources in Honduras" aims to demonstrate the role of communities, academia, industry, local governments, central government and citizen organizations. More than 90 citizen organizations, authorities, academic institutions and companies related to the marine world participated in the event.

Synergies between MAR Fellows keep the MAR Leadership Network active, strengthening ties between its participants and facilitating processes at the regional level.

Thank you so much for your support and stay tuned for our next news including 2016 cohort graduation, advances from Fellows’ projects and MAR Leadership Program next call for application!

For more information follows us at http://liderazgosam.org/en/ and https://www.facebook.com/MARLeadership/

Storytelling in Livingston, Guatemala
Storytelling in Livingston, Guatemala
Belize Fisheries Forum organized by Fellows
Belize Fisheries Forum organized by Fellows
Cost Benefits Webinar with Nicolas Pascal
Cost Benefits Webinar with Nicolas Pascal

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Comments:

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Fondo Mexicano para la Conservacion de la Naturaleza, A.C.

Location: Mexico D.F., Distrito Federal - Mexico
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @fondomexicano
Project Leader:
Maria Eugenia Arreola
Cancun, Quintana Roo Mexico
$13,986 raised of $25,000 goal
 
192 donations
$11,014 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

Fondo Mexicano para la Conservacion de la Naturaleza, A.C. has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.