Sanitary Pads to Keep 600 Young Girls in School

by Volunteer Action Network
Sanitary Pads to Keep 600 Young Girls in School
Sanitary Pads to Keep 600 Young Girls in School
Sanitary Pads to Keep 600 Young Girls in School
Sanitary Pads to Keep 600 Young Girls in School
Sanitary Pads to Keep 600 Young Girls in School
Sanitary Pads to Keep 600 Young Girls in School
Sanitary Pads to Keep 600 Young Girls in School
Sanitary Pads to Keep 600 Young Girls in School

Due to inability to effetively manage menstruation 1 out of 5 african school girls skips school or drop out of school entirly due to a lack of menstual products and poor sanitation. This critical unavailabilit of sanitayry products in uganda is a major barrier to education for girls of school going age. This is where your donation is helping to  change this reality. 

We distributed 800 packs of sanitary pads to S. Sudan refugees in borole and Pagirinya settlement. We further supported 420 school going girls with free lucky girl sanitary pads to enable them attend classes without shame. Most important we conducted mentrual health education both in schools and refugee settlements.

Client Quote:

"When I started using Lucky Girl Sanitary Pads I feel confident and I attend all my class" 

.Marry.

We still need your support to buy and asemble more local plant that will produce safe and affordable sanitory pads to benefit our girls and we shall continue to educate and creat awareness to break the myth around menstral health in Uganda.

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When a girl faces obstacles in managing her menses in a healthy way, she is at risk for infection, her self-esteem and self-confidence suffer, she may remain absent from school during her period, or worse still, drop out of school altogether upon reaching puberty. Over time, these negative effects add up, preventing a young girl from achieving her full potential and having a healthy, productive life.

Sofia from Gulu district had to drop out of school at primary 5 after she missed her final exams because of her periods. “When I started menstruating, I had many hard days. “she says.” I could not get myself any materials to use to stop myself from soiling my clothes, it was better for me to stay at home rather than go through that shame at school and that was the end of my education.”

“I started using cloths that I would cut from my old cloth to keep the blood from staining my dresses, but they were not enough and blood would still stain my clothes,"

I developed fear for the shame every end of the month. At 13-year-old, she dropped out of school, and was forced to get married because she could not stand the boys laughing at me whenever my periods started. Now she has 21 years with 3 children who she takes care of and pay for her daughter’s school fees. “After joining the Lucky Girls Group at Vac-Net office in Gulu, she learnt how to manage my periods with dignity”, she is part of the team that is working to solve this bleeding shame problem which is holding young girl’s dreams in balance.

“I feel I have regained my pride as a young woman”.

We are grateful to move together in this journey of transforming lives meaningfully your, donations makes all this possible we are hopeful your donation will  keep more young girls empowered with diginity.

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Accordingly, 70% of mothers in Bolore and Pagirinya refugee settlements think periods are dirty and 66% of girls and women manage periods without toilets. Handling periods in a refugee settlement is hugely complex, influenced by differences in sociocultural norms, with barely no education to young girls on how to experience their periods, what they can do while menstruating, what they can use to absorb menstrual blood and how they dispose the material, whether and from whom they can seek information and help.

When a girl faces obstacles in managing her menses in a healthy way, she is at risk for infection, her self-esteem and self-confidence suffer, she may remain absent from school during her period, or worse still, drop out of school altogether upon reaching puberty. Over time, these negative effects add up, preventing a young girl from achieving her full potential and having a healthy, productive life.

We are responding to this crisis by supplying free Lucky Girls Sanitary Pads to young girls and women in Bolore and Pagirinya refugee settlements. These 2 settlements host 36,000 people of which 72% are young girls, women and children between 9 to 18 years.

    "You saved me of the monthly shame, I missed collecting my food ratios because I feared to go near people during my periods in this camp life its been so hard" The way we need constant food supply we also nees constant supply for             pads.

    Ateny--- Bolore refugee settlement

We are grateful to move together in this journey of transforming lives meaningfully your, donations makes all this possible we are hopeful your donation will  keep more young girls empowered with diginity.

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Lucky Girl Sanitary Pads
Lucky Girl Sanitary Pads

Every girl desrves control over her future, the power to make her own choices about her health, family and career. But without education, this is a little more than a dream. more girls are leaving eductaion withouth basic literacy and numeracy skilld due to luck of access and affordability to sanitary Pads this is not fair.

We continue  to address this reality, through training of young girls on how to produce affordable and safe sanitary pads (The Luck Girl Sanitary Pads), providing education and awareness creation that benefit rural school going girls and women. We have supported more 400  young girls with sanitary pads and all were able to stay in class during their periods with diginity, addressing menstrual health management challenge for rural women and schoolgirls.

Quote: 

"For the first time I had the opportunity to learn about my health, I started using clean sanitary pads I feel more respected and confortable  More important I have not missed my lessons this month"

Thank you for the opportunity 

Monica-Gulu Secondary School

We are grateful to move together in this journey of transforming lives meaningfully your, donations makes all this possible we are hopeful your donation will  keep more young girls empowered with diginity.

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Lucky girl sanitary pads
Lucky girl sanitary pads

Menstrual health challenges that young girls and women face in Uganda are something that many people never even think about, because they don’t know any different. But if you live on less than $2 a day,  you can’t afford proper menstruation or sanitation products. Instead, women use mattress stuffing, leaves, newspapers, or rags—things that are unhealthy, inappropriate, and undignified. If you don’t have running water or access to latrines, the situation is worse.  Girls miss an average of 70 to 90 days of school every year because of poor access.  it  daunting and puts them at an even greater disadvantage in the education system.

Our Lucky Girl Sanitary Pads helpes to empower girls to achieve their full academic potential, curbing the high rates of menstrual-related absenteeism. Currently the project target 600 girls in Northern Uganda, and producess more 30 percent of the product which is donated to Gulu Women’s Prison and to schoolgirls who can’t afford it. We’re looking at potentially of expanding the project this year to support refugees coming from South Sudan and reach out up 300- young girls and women in Uganda.

Client Quote:

“I was in primary 5 when I first menstruated” Alice said. She remembers how she bled through her uniform, and every one at school laughed, the boys and girls all laughed at her so she became embarrassed and intimidated so she ran out of class, and did not want to go back. Neither her parents nor her teachers had told her about menstruation, or what to do once it happened. She says that underneath her embarrassment there was also confusion, fear and a feel of hopelessness."

Alice--- Gulu

We are grateful to work  together to support young girls and women in Uganda who are struggling to  transform their  lives meaningfully, your donation makes all this possible. Consider to give more young girls and women to have ahealthy periods.

Girls stay at school with diginity
Girls stay at school with diginity
Young girls making the lucky girl pads to support
Young girls making the lucky girl pads to support

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Organization Information

Volunteer Action Network

Location: Gulu - Uganda
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @VacNet_
Project Leader:
Bukenya Muusa
Gulu, Uganda

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