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Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia

by Sumatran Orangutan Society
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Replanting Rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia
Orangutan nests in Besitang
Orangutan nests in Besitang

An exciting update from the field - the team have been doing orangutan nest surveys in the restoration site - check out these photos, showing that our favourite red apes have been making themselves at home!

The camera traps have also yielded some exciting new images and footage, such as a Sunbear mother and cub at the Besitang forest restoration site! This image shows the cub, and the link below shows footage of both mother and cub together!

And, saving the best for last...A big male orangutan has been captured on camera trap, walking on the ground at the Besitang restoration site. The staff have seen orangutans and their nests at the site, but this is the first time one has been photographed by our camera traps. 

These images and footage show clear evidence that the restored forests are providing crucial new habitat for not only orangutans, but other species too - a huge thank you for supporting this work, these fantastic results are only possible thanks to our donors.

Sun bear cub
Sun bear cub
Big male orangutan caught on camera trap
Big male orangutan caught on camera trap

Links:

A herd of Sumatran elephants visited the site
A herd of Sumatran elephants visited the site

Our camera traps have caught images and footage of wildlife returning to the forest restoration site in Besitang, including a herd of critically endangered Sumatran elephants - see the images below! We have also been lucky enough to capture footage of the spectacular mating display of the Great Argus pheasant.

Orangutans and many other species, especially elephants and birds, are sometimes referred to as 'Gardeners of the Forest' because they actually help with the natural regeneration of the forest through the seeds that they 'plant' in their dung. It's really encouraging to see a wide variety of species using the restored habitat.

Thank you for helping us protect and restore Sumatra's rainforests, for all the wildlife that depends on them. Please share our project with your friends, family and networks, and help us restore even more crucial habitat.

A macaque monkey
A macaque monkey
A Great Argus pheasant
A Great Argus pheasant

Links:

One million trees!
One million trees!

This week we planted the millionth tree at our forest restoration site in Sumatra. A heartfelt thank you to everyone who helped us reach this amazing milestone.

To celebrate, we have launched an animation, voiced by SOS patron Bill Bailey, featuring the rather charming Armstrong the oranguatan! You can watch the animation http://orangutans-sos.org/savearmstrong.

SOS Director Helen Buckland is in Sumatra this week to visit the projects and witness the planting of the millionth tree. She says:

"Wildlife is starting to return to this corner of the park, including orangutans and elephants.  When I first visited the site where we are planting the one millionth tree, it was such a barren landscape, you couldn’t even hear birdsong. But today, it’s a thriving young forest , buzzing with life once again. Planting a million trees to restore lost habitat is a fantastic achievement. However, we must keep fighting to protect and restore the last standing forests in Sumatra if we are to turn the situation around for orangutans.  Please share our project far and wide so that we can carry on with our frontline conservation work and keep campaigning against any further destruction of Sumatra’s rainforests.”

Thank you for helping us build a brighter future for Sumatra’s forests, its wildlife and its people.

Links:

The planned destruction of 1.2 million hectares
The planned destruction of 1.2 million hectares

With your support, we are restoring damaged forests in Sumatra, re-creating lost habitat for critically endangered species and restoring ecosystem services for the local people. But a recent announcement could lead to unimaginable destruction of huge areas of forest, that we will never be able to get back.

The Governor of Aceh province in Sumatra is set to wipe 1.2 million hectares of forest off the map, for agriculture (including oil palm plantations), logging and mining. 

These forests are the only place on Earth where orangutans, tigers, elephants and rhinos co-exist - and all are critically endangered.

Experts have warned that if these plans go ahead, all these iconic species could face extinction within 10 to 20 years. It will also lead to natural disasters such as floods and landslides, which spells disaster for the people of Aceh too.

The scale of the proposed destruction is catastrophic - we must convince the Governor to abandon these plans immediately.

This is a conservation emergency and we need your help urgently.

Please sign the petition today, and please ask everyone in your networks to do the same.


Links:

The local Besitang community planting trees
The local Besitang community planting trees

Guardians of the forest...

Since beginning our forest restoration work in Besitang in 2008, we have seen a wonderful reaction from the community. Hundreds of local people sprung into action to help us build organic tree nurseries and plant more than 400,000 trees at this site to date, 180,000 over the last year alone. This grassroots support is the key to the success of the programme, and indeed of all of our projects in Sumatra. By equipping the local people with the motivation and tools to take responsibility for this area of the national park, they have become true guardians of the forest. We are delighted to announce that encroachment into the Sei Betung region of the Gunung Leuser National Park, where our Besitang rainforest restoration site is based, has ceased completely – a major achievement, which we hope can be replicated in other areas which are still under threat.

...and Gardeners of the forest

As well as planting trees, the restoration team have been implementing an innovative new approach: using artificial perches to encourage birds into the restoration site to accelerate natural regeneration.

Birds are excellent seed dispersers” says Ari, our Restoration Manager. “We are planting fast growing tree species that attract birds and other animals to forage in the restoration site, and these animals bring seeds from a wide variety of rainforest tree species. We got the idea when we saw a dead tree in the restoration site with many different types of plants growing naturally around it. We then observed that the dead tree was being used as a perch for various bird species. We began making artificial perches using dead tree branches.” There are now more than 30 within the rainforest restoration site in Besitang. We have already seen a variety of birds using the perches; species including Cerocok, Kipasan Mutiara, Perkutu Jawa, Kirik-kirik biru, Kacer, Striped Parrot and Woodpecker.

Just two months after installing the perches, the restoration team spotted several different tree species growing naturally around them. “They have been brought here by the birds, which must have dispersed the seeds while perching,” says Ari. Plants recorded include Marak Gajah, Sirih-Sirih, Turi-Turi, Kandri, Luingan, Tapak Gajah, Daun Tempe Tempe, Halaban and Senggani. “Most of these are fast growing ‘pioneer’ species that will help shade out weeds,” explains Ari. “They commonly attract wildlife including birds and primates too, as they have fruits. And our team spotted an orangutan nest in Marak Gajah trees in the restoration site!” 

Ari installs a bird perch
Ari installs a bird perch
A Betet loreng makes use of a perch!
A Betet loreng makes use of a perch!

Links:

 

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Organization Information

Sumatran Orangutan Society

Location: Abingdon, Oxon - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @orangutansSOS
Project Leader:

UK Director
Abingdon, Oxfordshire United Kingdom
$91,861 raised of $150,000 goal
 
1,488 donations
$58,139 to go
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