Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda

by CPAR Uganda Ltd
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda
Restore eye sight & worth of rural poor in Uganda

Project Report | Mar 6, 2024
High profits, but at what cost to welders' eyes?

By Norah Owaraga | Project Leader and Managing Director

At what cost to welder's unprotected eyes?
At what cost to welder's unprotected eyes?

Before I became involved in our project that is focused on the wellbeing of our eyes, I would have simply celebrated the testimony of a young welder. In response to a conversation on social media, “suggest businesses that require little capital but yield high profits,” the young welder wrote:

“I am a welder and I deal in welding metals. In a day I can go into work with 2k (2,000 shillings) in the morning and I can come back home in the evening with 20k (20,000 shillings) through welding boda bodas (motorbikes) and doors.”

Indeed, my colleague, an innovator, confirmed how lucrative welding can be. He shared:

“This makes me reflect back during my welding apprentice, my trainer would tell us that we are permitted to earn our pocket money from daily customers. So, we used to buy our own welding rod (each could cost 500 shillings), this was to help work on daily customers who bring broken hoes, motorcycles, wheel barrows, bicycles and cars.

Welding each of these could cost around 2,000 shillings to 5,000 shillings. It could cost more depending on the damage on the tool or machine the customers had brought at the workshop. On a daily basis a welding trainee would go back home with 20,000 shillings or even more depending on the location of your workshop and the good relationships you have with your customers.”

Wow! A business which multiplies your investment ten-fold or more within a day is worth celebrating and promoting. Be that as it may, my newly gained ‘eye-wellbeing-consciousness’ reminded me to ask, at what cost to the welders’ eyes?

I was reminded of photo on social media in which government officials were celebrating a skilling programme and the photo accompanying the story was of a young female welder, welding without any protective gear covering her eyes.

“Long-term exposure to UV light can produce cataracts in some persons. Exposure to infrared light can heat the lens of the eye and produce cataracts over the long term.

Visible light from welding processes is very bright and can overwhelm the ability of the iris of the eye to close sufficiently and rapidly enough to limit the brightness of the light reaching the retina. The result is that the light is temporarily blinding and fatiguing to the eye.” This is according to the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety.

I am yet to know of a blind welder. Reality is that we need good eyes to earn a living from welding. Which makes it vital that a welder should earn while protecting the wellbeing of eyes by wearing the necessary protective gear. I am excited that through our project, we will encourage the culture of being consciously concerned about the wellbeing of our eyes in whatever we do.

We are grateful for the support of our donors, without which we are not able to be among those addressing a significant eye problem in Uganda. According to a cross-sectional study on prevalence and risk factors for visual impairment, for example, cataract, is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly. And yet it is preventable.

Through our project, we believe we can contribute to reversing this trend through community outreaches and health promotion campaigns that make people consciously aware of preventable blindness and to want to do something about it. With your support, yes, we can. Please consider making a donation. Thank you.

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Organization Information

CPAR Uganda Ltd

Location: Entebbe - Uganda
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @CPARUGANDA
Project Leader:
Norah Owaraga
Entebbe , Uganda
$25 raised of $10,000 goal
 
1 donations
$9,975 to go
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