Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal

by Roads to Rehab - Nepal
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Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal
Medical care & rehabilitation changing lives Nepal

Namaste, 

This month has been quiet at the Shelter as it is festival time! Everything stops for two big festivals – Dassein and Tihar - and some of the patient’s at MeRO’s Shelter were able to return home for the festivities.

Little Arya however, remained in hospital. Some of you may recall reading about her in our September newsletter and earlier Facebook posts. We also put out an appeal for funds to cover the costs of her medical care,  and have so far been able to contribute $1100 of an estimated $4000  Our grateful thanks and those of her parents, go to all of you who contributed.

18-month-old Arya was admitted to MeRO's Shelter  in June with congenital hip dysplasia and a complete hip dislocation. This is rarely seen in Western countries as babies are screened within 72 hours of being born, and if diagnosed, are treated with a special splint and/or occasionally surgery.

In Nepal, screening and early intervention may not happen as many regions do not have adequate maternal and health services. This is a tragedy, as hip instability, where the hips can be wiggled in the socket because of loose ligaments, is the most common newborn abnormality affecting approximately 10% of babies. In 90% of cases, the ligaments tighten up naturally after birth but 1% will need treatment and 0.2% will be like Arya and have a completely dislocated hip.

Arya started her medical journey with two weeks of traction. She then had a closed reduction of her hip to try to manipulate it back into the socket. This was followed by six weeks in a special plaster cast. This approach was unsuccessful. She then underwent 8 weeks of traction in hospital and in early November will be operated on again.  This time, surgeons will perform an open reduction of the joint with additional bone surgery, the insertion of metal hardware and ligament tightening.

It will be a long road to rehabilitation for Arya. Her parents did not receive much in the way of support from family or community.  Her plight was perceived to be a punishment from the gods brought upon the family because her mother married a man from a lower caste. Arya’s parents managed to secure a loan for US$200 and travelled to Kathmandu. Her father said “I had already taken a loan of $200 to come to Kathmandu, so how could I possibly manage the huge amount which the hospital told me it would cost for her surgery? I could not stop thinking about this and I felt it was killing me inside.  Every day, I asked many people for a loan, but no one was willing to help me. Also, if I worked for my entire life, I would never be able to pay back this amount".

They are incredibly grateful for your support, and we will keep you posted on the difference your generosity makes to Arya, and so many other patients like her who are admitted to MeRO’s Shelter.

With best wishes and grateful thanks,

Virginia Dixon

President, Roads to Rehab Nepal

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Namaste,

Welcome to our July project report.

Since our last project report your generosity has supported the medical and surgical intervention, nursing care and physiotherapy for 16 new patients at MeRO’s Shelter and seven patients have been discharged.

It is very hard for people who come from remote and regional Nepal when they come to a big city like Kathmandu. They have no idea how to manage the complex medical system. They may not know the difference between private and public hospitals and the cost implications of both, and unless they are fortunate enough to have family to stay with, they do not know where to stay, or how much it will cost. They are often exploited with life-changing economic and health consequences.  Anjali went from having a diagnosis of a hair-line fracture of her knee to osteosarcoma (bone cancer) and fortunately for her, she was referred to MeRO.

 It took a month for Team MeRO to organise everything. and they knew it would be very challenging for everyone, Samrat said “It was like we had a Mount Everest in front of us and we were determined to climb it. We started talking to many people and finally after a month we arranged everything”. The complexity of the challenges facing MeRO as they undertake their wonderful work is often immense. We could not help make it happen without you.

Samrat said “Our support of Anjali is how we work to shape a life – there is nothing called impossible”. Anjali’s long road to rehabilitation ended 3 weeks ago and she was discharged home.  On behalf of her and her family and everyone at MeRO, we thank you again for your kindness and generosity. Stay safe and take care.

With best wishes and grateful thanks,

Virginia Dixon

President, Roads to Rehab Nepal

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Namaste,

Welcome to our quarterly project report!

In case you missed our last email, NHEDF changed its' name in January and is now called 'Medical Rehabilitation Organisation' (MeRO).

Since our last report, your generosity has supported the medical and surgical intervention, nursing care and physiotherapy for three existing patients and eleven new patients at MeRO’s Shelter. Six people were discharged. One of these was 27-year-old Janaki and this is her story.

First, some background: Medical care is not free in Nepal, however people requiring major heart, orthopaedic or neurological surgery are eligible for a payment from the Government of about $900 Samrat, MeRO’s Director said “such support is simply a drop in the ocean. Big surgery costs much more than that. There are many exclusions - infestigations, blood tests, blood for transfusions, implants, prostheses, food, medications and things like IV tubing, catheters etc. For many people the only options are to live with their condition, beg on the streets, or die thinking about how different their life could have been. In Nepal people don't have many choices but we don’t want to see people dying in front of us. so we help”.

Janaki comes from Western Nepal. Two years ago, during her pregnancy, she was diagnosed with a serious heart problem requiring surgery. Being pregnant, she was not a candidate for surgery, so she was instructed to return to Kathmandu for surgery when her daughter was 6 months old.

Janaki’s family was poor and could not afford the cost of treatment, even with the one off Government payments, so she never returned to Kathmandu as instructed. As time went on, her condition deteriorated, and she could hardly walk without becoming extremely breathless. Like many people in Nepal who live in poverty,  her husband went to India to find work and came home with the equivalent of $1000. They finally made it to Kathmandu, however, this amount was insufficient for cardiac surgery. Fortunately for Janaki, the hospital referred her to MeRO.

It was initially challenging for MeRO to cover the costs as cardiac surgery is incredibly expensive. Samrat explained “MeRO initially had to budget for the cost of surgery (approximately $2200), plus investigations, medications, food for Janaki and her husbankd, whilst in hospital and 8 pints of blood – the latter cost approximately $100..”  Janaki had surgery on December 16th and  MeRO had a wonderful surprise!

MeRO’s grateful thanks go to “the hospital's amazing management team for helping us with all the processes and providing discounts. All MeRO was required to pay in the end was NPR 35,000” which is about $400.Janaki and her family were transferred to the Shelter for ongoing follow-ups, wound management and physiotherapy, and 2 months later the family were discharged home with Janaki having made a great recovery. Her little daughter is delighted!

On behalf of Janaki and her family and everyone at MeRO, we thank you again from the bottom of our hearts for your kindness and generosity. Our work, and MeRO’s, would not be possible without you and it is solely because of you that we have been both able to keep going, especially during these difficult times. Stay safe and take care.

 With best wishes and grateful thanks,

Virginia Dixon

President, Roads to Rehab Nepal

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Namaste,

NHEDF has a new name! They wanted a name that better reflects what they do, and as you  know, the name NHEDF dated back to before the earthquake. As of January 18th they are now known as Medical Rehabilitation Organisation (MeRO). 

This is something that they have been planning for 3 years now, and it has been a work in progress, with the  process being significantly delayed due to COVID. Please be assured that their new name does not change the way either us or MeRO operates, nor does it change our constitution, mission, aims or objectives. Both organisations still fund and facilitate access to medical intervention, nursing care, physiotherapy and rehabilitation services for people in Nepal, who experience life changing illness or injury but cannot access medical care due to poverty.

In Nepal, non-profit organisations apply for registration with a government department called the Social Welfare Council (SWC). NHEDF previously had this, however the name change requires a new registration. The SWC regulates, governs and oversees the registration of non-profit organisations in Nepal including but not limited to matters that relate to legislation, compliance, reporting, accountability, good governance and transparency. It also provides governance documents and undertakes monitoring and evaluation activities for international organisations registered with it, for which it charges a fee.

A million thanks to you all for your amazing support which is part of the reason that NHEDF had the confidence in their longevity to make this process worthwhile. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us.

Yours sincerely,

Virginia Dixon

President, Roads to Rehab Nepal

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Home time!
Home time!

Namaste,

NHEDF’s Director, Samrat, said: “Coming to Kathmandu is not a big thing but coming to Kathmandu with little money in your pocket and hoping to get treatment for cancer is big thing.”

In Nepal a family’s financial circumstances can change dramatically as a result of accident, illness or a chance meeting. The financial stress resulting from the cost of medical care causes people to go into debt, borrow from family, friends or their community, or worse, loan sharks. They may have to sell their land that may have been in the family for generations, leaving an entire family homeless, some even contemplate suicide. They take their own lives because they cannot see any way out of their situation, or they may feel a terrible burden of guilt if they are the ones experiencing the illness or injury, and see suicide as their only solution.

One day Samrat was visiting a hospital and noticed a man crying in the hospital foyer. He went up to him and invited him to tell his story.

The man explained he has a thirteen-year-old son, Karan, who had been diagnosed with osteosarcoma 6 months previously and had been receiving treatment. However he was starting to despair as the money had run out. As a last resort he and his son travelled for 11 hours by bus to get to Kathmandu but when he found out the costs involved, he was devastated. The family had not had an income for 8 months and he did not have this amount of money. The most he thought he could raise was about NPR 10,000, from selling his goats. He runs a small cycle shop but has nothing else. No land, nothing of value, no possibility of further loans from family or his community. He felt that his son would die and this this is why he was crying. The man said to Samrat:  "I have already spent NPR 400,000 ($4600) on his treatment. I took a loan of NPR 350,000 but now there is no one else I could borrow money from. I have already visited 4 different hospitals before coming to Kathmandu. I don't have any land to sell”.

Samrat immediately contacted Karan's treating doctor and made arrangements for them to be transferred to NHEDF's Shelter. Karan had surgery to remove the tumour in early October, followed by 2 cycles of chemotherapy. On the 13th November Karan was discharged from NHEDF and referred to a hospital in Dharan which is closer to home. The wonderful doctor there agreed to waive the costs for further required cycles of chemo. Karan was very happy to be going home and looking forward to playing with his brothers and sisters again.

NHEDF regularly has young people with osteosarcoma referred to them and it has a very good prognosis in children. Without NHEDF, and the support of wonderful people like you, Karan’s circumstances would have been very different.

We truly appreciate your generosity and a million thank you to those who have supported our work throughout 2021. If you ever have any questions or would like more information about our work, please visit our website or contact us on info@roads-to-rehab-nepal.org

We hope you have a happy, COVID-free Christmas, safe travels and a Happy New Year!

We also hope that 2022 will be a better year for everyone, no matter where you are in the world, and we look forward to keeping you updated about the wonderful work we do.

With best wishes and grateful thanks,

Virginia Dixon

President,

Roads to Rehab Nepal

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Organization Information

Roads to Rehab - Nepal

Location: Fraser - Australia
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Virginia Dixon
Fraser, ACT Australia
$37,700 raised of $50,000 goal
 
380 donations
$12,300 to go
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