Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation

by ENV Wildlife Conservation Trust
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Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation
Protect Endangered Wildlife Against Exploitation

Project Report | May 20, 2024
ENV's updates from the first quarter of 2024

By Quyen Vu | Project Leader

The ENV Call Center PSA
The ENV Call Center PSA

As of the first three months of 2024, considerable progress has been made in the battle against wildlife exploitation in Vietnam. ENV’s Wildlife Crime Unit has logged 638 new cases, with 2,043 violations recorded. In addition, over 360 wild animals have been seized or voluntarily transferred during this period.

As ever, we are pleased to share some important field updates since our last report:

Bears

In 2013, 19 bears were transferred to rescue centers and sanctuaries, and as of March 2024, there are now only 204 bears left in captivity in Vietnam. This is a huge improvement from the more than 4,300 bears that were kept in captivity for bile farming in 2005 when ENV started tackling the issue. Currently, 46 provinces can claim bear farm-free status, and we are continuing to work hard to ensure that the remaining bears are rescued and the practice of bear farming is put to an end.

Elephant ivory

In the first quarter of 2024, the ENV Wildlife Crime Unit logged a total of 30 ivory-related cases, with 26 of these being ivory internet crime cases.

As part of our efforts to stop the killing of African elephants for ivory in Vietnam by reducing consumer demand, the beginning of this year marked the third placement of anti-ivory educational standees at nine government offices in the Buon Ma Thuot region, reminding the public that owning ivory does not equate to a high status and listing four actions the public can take to protect elephants. Overall, standees have been placed at 12 government buildings and tourist sites in Buon Ma Thuot city. This initiative is accompanied by other elephant protection and anti-ivory communications activities such as viral adverts, awareness events hosted by ENV’s Buon Ma Thuot Volunteer Outpost, and ENV’s “Elephant Friendly Business” initiative, which engages and raises awareness within the tourism sector and amongst shop owners.

On the prosecution side, ENV closely followed with Hanoi Police and Hanoi Procuracya case that resulted in over 9 years handed down to two sellers and a suspended sentence for a driver for illegally transporting a tiger and possessing 2.7 kg of rhino horn and ivory products in Hanoi (Case ref. 24487/ENV).

Pangolins

From January to March 2024, a total of 31 pangolin cases were logged by the ENV Wildlife Crime Unit.

In a particular case, upon being given a pangolin as a gift, a woman from Thua Thien Hue province took quick action to protect the endangered animal. She contacted our Hotline seeking assistance in ensuring the safe transfer of the pangolin to appropriate authorities. In response, we worked closely with the woman to coordinate the transfer of the pangolin to the Forest Protection Department. Thanks to her responsible actions and our collaborative efforts, the pangolin was successfully transferred to the appropriate authorities for care and protection (Case ref. 29578/ENV).

Important prosecutions also occurred, including a man in Quang Ninh province who received 6 years in prison for illegally transporting four live Sunda pangolins (Manis javanica) on his motorbike (Case ref. 30251/ENV), and another subject who received a fine of VND 550,000,000 for illegally transporting a live Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) (Case ref. 28986/ENV).

Primates, turtles, & other illegal ‘pets’

In 2023, a total of 980 turtles and tortoises have been confiscated or voluntarily transferred, and 109 turtles and tortoises have already been rescued in the first quarter of 2024 alone.

In a particular case, Hoa Vang District Forest Protection Department in Da Nang seized from a pagoda 86 turtles that devotees had released over the years in the belief that it can bring good luck.

In addition, 17 macaques were confiscated or voluntarily transferred.

Notably, in September 2023, a person was arrested for illegally transporting two long-tailed macaques and fined VND 1.250 million for advertising wildlife on social media. In October 2022, the same person was fined VND 15 million for illegally transporting prohibited wildlife. This was after receiving an 18-month suspended sentence from Hanoi City Court for transporting a gibbon in 2022. On March 29, 2024, the person was sentenced to 3 years in prison for illegally selling two macaques (Case ref. 11291/ENV).

Internet crime

ENV received reports of over 1,832 cases of wildlife crime in 2023. These crimes involved the advertising and sale of wildlife on different social media platforms and websites, including Facebook, YouTube, and TikTok. In the first three months of 2024, a total of 302 crimes were reported, comprising 1,525 violations.

In particular, two individuals were subjected to substantial fines as a result of their involvement in online wildlife sales. Specifically, one individual was fined VND 85 million (~ USD 3,600) by the Krong No District Police, while the other was fined VND 89.25 million (~ USD 3,500) by the Dong Xoai City Police and the Binh Phuoc Provincial Forest Protection Department. Both subjects were found to have illegally advertised wildlife and their products online and were also found in possession of dead animals or parts. With the highest possible fine for the advertisement of wildlife being VND 100 million, these fines represent a significant step towards preventing others from engaging in similar actions against wildlife; by establishing effective deterrence, it is possible to address the majority of these cases, limiting the rise of cybercrime.

Communication and Public Awareness

Recently, the ENV Communications team has conducted a mission in Nghe An province with the aim of recruiting volunteers and spreading awareness of tiger exploitation at the infamous basement in the region. Around 4,977 postcards encouraging the public to report tiger crimes to the ENV Hotline or law enforcement were distributed.

In addition, in March, ENV released a wild bird protection guide, titled “Wild Birds Prohibited or Restricted from Advertising and Trade,” in support of law enforcement efforts in implementing the Prime Minister’s Directive on the conservation of wild and migratory birds. The guide features 264 species of wild and migratory birds, complete with photos for easy identification of species and information on their protection status. Birds included in the guide are endangered, prohibited, or restricted from trade, and require documentation proving their legal origin.

Lastly, in May we released “The ENV Call Center”, our 57th Public Service Announcement, encouraging the public to protect wildlife by reporting wildlife violations to the ENV toll-free Wildlife Crime Hotline at 1800-1522.

We are extremely grateful to our generous donors who have been supporting ENV in our mission to preserve and protect Vietnam’s biodiversity from exploitation.

Without you, none of this would be possible.

 

Pangolin voluntarily transferred to authorities
Pangolin voluntarily transferred to authorities
Anti-ivory stand at governmental building
Anti-ivory stand at governmental building
Wild bird protection guide
Wild bird protection guide
The ENV Call Center PSA
The ENV Call Center PSA
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Jan 25, 2024
A new year in the fight to end wildlife exploitation

By Quyen Vu | Project Leader

Oct 4, 2023
Field updates for the second quarter of 2023

By Quyen Vu | Project Leader

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Organization Information

ENV Wildlife Conservation Trust

Location: Marshall, VA - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @envusa
Project Leader:
Quyen Vu
Marshall , VA United States
$8,905 raised of $20,000 goal
 
152 donations
$11,095 to go
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