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Nepal Earthquake Humanitarian Response Fund

by CARE
Nepal Earthquake Humanitarian Response Fund
NEPAL recovery efforts
NEPAL recovery efforts

On April 25 and May 12 2015 Nepal was rocked by two devastating 7.8 and 7.3 magnitude earthquakes. Thousands of people lost their homes in one night. CARE has been a main support in the long-term recovert of the most vulnerable population affectd by the Nepal Earthquake. Please continue supporting us for the delivery of a robust Earthquake recovery program.

WHAT WE HAVE DONE:

SHELTER: CARE is providing shelter assistance to families whose homes are heavily damaged or destroyed. Some 10,000 people have already received emergency shelter supplies (that include tarpaulins, corrugated iron sheeting, shelter tool kits, fixing kits and kitchen sets) from CARE. CARE is currently distributing high-quality shelter repair kits. These kits include corrugated sheets, specialized nails, tools and other useful items meant to help people rebuild their homes to be stronger and sturdier. In addition, some 2,700 families are receiving 15,000 Nepalese Rupees (roughly $150) to pay for labor and buy extra items they may need to rebuild. CARE and its partners are working to empower families to repair and rebuild their homes stronger to face future earthquakes. This long-term “building back safer” approach involves training local carpenters and community members on improved building techniques to make homes safer, building model homes, holding information sessions and having roving teams of local building experts available to offer helpful advice.

WASH (WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE): CARE has distributed water purification tablets, built emergency latrines, provided hand washing facilities and carried out hygiene promotion amongst the affected communities. CARE staff and local partners are also conducting hygiene workshops and distributing temporary latrine materials. In some districts, CARE is also helping to rehabilitate water sources and working back towards achieving open defecation free (ODF) areas. To date, CARE has reached nearly 6,500 people. REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH An estimated 126,000 pregnant women affected by the devastating earthquake in Nepal are in urgent need of health services. As part of our emergency response to earthquake areas, CARE has distributed reproductive health kits with information related to maternal health to health facilities and pregnant women and oriented them on the usage of health kits. We have provided transitional homes and maternity tents for women and girls and equipped birthing centers with essential equipment and supplies.

GENDER BASED VIOLENCE: In times of crisis after natural disasters such as the Nepal earthquakes, incidents of gender-based violence (GBV) can increase. As part of our emergency earthquake response, CARE has created friendly spaces in a number of areas where women can go to at any time to feel safe and empowered and have access to information, education, recreational activities, support and services. Referral mechanisms for the reporting and identification of gender-based violence have been put in place. CARE is also working with the BBC Media Action to provide people with practical information through a radio program on different issues like shelter, safety information, information on economic recovery and livelihoods.

LIVELIHOODS & FOOD SECURITY: The Nepal earthquakes were devastating for local livelihoods. Some 2.8 million people were affected, with livelihoods and sources of income destroyed, lost or disrupted. Of these, 20,000 people have been identified as most vulnerable. Working closely with our local partners, CARE has begun assisting vulnerable families with financial support to restore such livelihoods as vegetable farming, rice production and other income-generating activities. CARE is also providing a variety of vegetable seeds along with weatherproof storage bags to families. The goal of this programming will be to help families meet their basic needs, while earning additional income to help them build back their lives. To date, CARE has reached 1,156 individuals with food and 5,597 individuals with livelihoods

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On April 25 and May 12 2015 Nepal was rocked by two devastating 7.8 and 7.3 magnitude earthquakes. CARE is working with partners to deliver emergency relief in four of the worst affected areas of Nepal: Gorkha (55,370 individuals), Sindhupalchowk (22,543 individuals), Dhading (35,553 individuals) and Lamjung (12,689 individuals). CARE’s emergency response is focused on providing lifesaving shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene, reproductive health, gender-based violence and livelihood assistance, helping communities recover in the months and years to come. So far, CARE has reached over 130,000 people (including those in the Kathmandu area).

 

For details on Nepal Gender Overview and Location specific RGA’s please click, here.

 

Shelter: CARE is providing shelter assistance to families whose homes are heavily damaged or destroyed. Some 10,000 people have already received emergency shelter supplies

 

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: CARE has distributed water purification tablets, built emergency latrines, provided hand washing facilities and carried out hygiene promotion amongst the affected communities. To date, CARE has reached nearly 6,500 people.

 

Reproductive Health:  As part of our emergency response to earthquake areas, CARE has distributed reproductive health kits with information related to maternal health to health facilities and pregnant women and oriented them on the usage of health kits. We have provided transitional homes and maternity tents for women and girls and equipped birthing centers with essential equipment and supplies.

 

Gender Based Violence: In times of crisis after natural disasters such as the Nepal earthquakes, incidents of gender-based violence (GBV) can increase. As part of our emergency earthquake response, CARE has created friendly spaces in a number of areas where women can go to at any time to feel safe and empowered and have access to information, education, recreational activities, support and services.

To learn how you can prevent gender based violence in your community click here.

 

Livelihoods and Food Security: Some 2.8 million people were affected, with livelihoods and sources of income destroyed, lost or disrupted. Of these, 20,000 people have been identified as most vulnerable. Working closely with our local partners, CARE has begun assisting vulnerable families with financial support to restore such livelihoods as vegetable farming, rice production and other income-generating activities. CARE is also providing a variety of vegetable seeds along with weatherproof storage bags to families. To date, CARE has reached 1,156 individuals with food and 5,597 individuals with livelihoods

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On April 25 and May 12 2015 Nepal was rocked by two devastating 7.8 and 7.3 magnitude earthquakes. CARE is working with partners to deliver emergency relief in four of the worst affected areas of Nepal: Gorkha (55,370 individuals), Sindhupalchowk (22,543 individuals), Dhading (35,553 individuals) and Lamjung (12,689 individuals). CARE’s emergency response is focused on providing lifesaving shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene, reproductive health, gender-based violence and livelihood assistance, helping communities recover in the months and years to come. So far, CARE has reached over 130,000 people (including those in the Kathmandu area).

Shelter: CARE is providing shelter assistance to families whose homes are heavily damaged or destroyed. Some 10,000 people have already received emergency shelter supplies

Water, Sanitation and Hygene: CARE has distributed water purification tablets, built emergency latrines, provided hand washing facilities and carried out hygiene promotion amongst the affected communities. To date, CARE has reached nearly 6,500 people.

Reproductive Health:  As part of our emergency response to earthquake areas, CARE has distributed reproductive health kits with information related to maternal health to health facilities and pregnant women and oriented them on the usage of health kits. We have provided transitional homes and maternity tents for women and girls and equipped birthing centers with essential equipment and supplies.

Gender Based Violence: In times of crisis after natural disasters such as the Nepal earthquakes, incidents of gender-based violence (GBV) can increase. As part of our emergency earthquake response, CARE has created friendly spaces in a number of areas where women can go to at any time to feel safe and empowered and have access to information, education, recreational activities, support and services. 

Livelihoods and Food Security: Some 2.8 million people were affected, with livelihoods and sources of income destroyed, lost or disrupted. Of these, 20,000 people have been identified as most vulnerable. Working closely with our local partners, CARE has begun assisting vulnerable families with financial support to restore such livelihoods as vegetable farming, rice production and other income-generating activities. CARE is also providing a variety of vegetable seeds along with weatherproof storage bags to families. To date, CARE has reached 1,156 individuals with food and 5,597 individuals with livelihoods

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CARE / Brian Sokol / 2015
CARE / Brian Sokol / 2015

Thank you for your support of CARE’s Nepal Earthquake Humanitarian Response Fund. Below are updates on CARE’s response since the deadly quake struck on April 25, 2015. 

The initial 7.8 magnitude earthquake caused significant loss of life, widespread injuries and massive property destruction. More than 300 aftershocks followed, including a 7.3 magnitude earthquake on May 12. To date, 8,790 deaths have been reported, along with 22,300 injuries. The quake destroyed 602,254 houses and partially damaged an additional 288,255 homes, as well as infrastructure including public buildings and health facilities. More than six months later, although many challenges remain, conditions are slowly improving. CARE, which launched an immediate relief effort to help quake survivors, is making a gradual transition from an emergency response phase focused on meeting basic needs to an early recovery phase that includes constructing safe and sturdy homes, supporting reproductive health facilities, conducting awareness on gender-based violence, and rebuilding latrines, among many longer-term activities. At the same time, we realize that the most vulnerable groups in Nepal will still require basic humanitarian assistance in the months to come.

 Some of the specific accomplishments to date are as follows:

  • Shelter: CARE and our partners distributed 10,000 emergency shelter kits including corrugated iron sheeting and tarpaulins to households in need. We also distributed other essential household items such as mattresses/sleeping mats, blankets, kitchen utensils, buckets, jerry cans and mosquito nets to people who had lost these basic necessities.
  • Food Security and Livelihoods: We helped 11,562 individuals begin to rebuild their livelihoods, including the provision of seeds and cash-for-work activities.
  • Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: CARE distributed water purification solution to ensure access to safe drinking water and to prevent the spread of water-borne communicable diseases. We also provided hygiene kits and materials to build emergency latrines and bathing facilities, in addition to hygiene education. Together, these activities benefited 64,645 people.
  • Health:We distributed reproductive/maternal health kits to health facilities and pregnant women, as well as trained them to use the kits. CARE also set up reproductive health camps to provide essential services to targeted villages, provided transitional homes and maternity tents for women, equipped birthing centers with essential equipment and supplies, and trained midwives.

Mirsi B.K. (pictured in photo) received support from CARE after her house was badly damaged during the quake. “We are planning to demolish our old house and build a new one from the iron sheeting provided by CARE,” says Mirsi. Like almost every other family in the village, Mirsi also received packets of seeds and hygiene kits from CARE. As Mirsi prepares her field for planting, she says, “We will plant the vegetable seeds provided by CARE as soon as we finish harvesting millet from our field. I am very thankful to CARE for providing us all the necessary items to sustain our lives.”   

Looking ahead, CARE remains committed to helping families rebuild their lives and recover their livelihoods.

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The name CARE is very familiar to 36 year old Mangal who belongs to the Dalit community of Nepal. He has many fond memories of CARE working in his village 15 years ago where they formed community groups to manage waste and provide livestock to families. “We used to be regularly discriminated against by the older generations because we belong to the Dalit community,” he says. “But about 15 years ago CARE came to our village and formed groups that included people from the higher caste and lower caste. Since then, people of Barpak have learned to work together without discriminating against each other. Today the perception of the Dalit people has totally changed. We can socialize with people from the higher castes and even work together to help each other out.”

This is one of the many examples where CARE has made long term sustainable change in many parts of Nepal. After the earthquake on April 25, 2015, CARE is once again seeking to make long term change for the people of Barpak, whose houses were reduced to rubble after the massive earthquake that struck the country.

There are many people like Mangal, who lost everything in the earthquake. All they have left are the bittersweet memories of their beautiful homes, built out of the local natural stone and slate tiles, whose picturesque beauty was so well-know that tourists from all over the world flocked to the village to stay.

Mangal remembers the moment the earthquake destroyed his home with sorrow; “We had a beautiful house in Dandagaon village, where many tourists used to visit. After the earthquake all of our essential belongings like utensils and food were buried inside the rubble. I did not expect to survive as I could see the entire village collapse in front of my eyes.  I am very surprised and thankful that I am still alive.”

CARE has distributed more than 2,000 cooking utensils and hygiene items to the people of Barpak village, which the people of Dandagaon now rely on for their daily use. As Mangal says; “these utensils have been so useful for us in this situation. We could have never afforded to purchase them on our own.” 

Turning his attention to the roof of the small shelter he has constructed for himself and his family after the earthquake he notes; “we made this shelter from our old iron sheets that we were able to collect from the rubble of our house. But I don’t know if it can protect us from the monsoon rains. CARE has already helped us in so many ways, and we hope that CARE will help us reconstructing our shelter too.”

Many people share the same concerns as Mangal. The few materials they have been able to save from the wreckage of their homes are often damaged or inadequate. CARE has already begun distributing iron sheeting to hundreds of households in Barpak village of Gorkha in a desperate race to try to provide them with the materials necessary to construct durable temporary shelters before the monsoon rains start and the road down to the main town or Gorkha becomes cut off.           

The Dalits of Barpak are an amazingly resilient and resourceful people. All Mangal and his community ask for is some assistance to get them started with basic building materials and expert advice and then they are more than ready to rebuild their lives and their homes. They will work together as a community - without prejudices around caste or ethnicity - to make sure that everyone comes back from this disaster stronger and more united.

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Organization Information

CARE

Location: Atlanta, GA - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @CARE
Project Leader:
Maggie Malloy
Atlanta, GA United States

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