Apply to Join

Protecting Marine Ecosystems in Mexico

by Global Vision International Charitable Trust
Protecting Marine Ecosystems in Mexico
Protecting Marine Ecosystems in Mexico
Protecting Marine Ecosystems in Mexico
Protecting Marine Ecosystems in Mexico
Protecting Marine Ecosystems in Mexico
Protecting Marine Ecosystems in Mexico
Protecting Marine Ecosystems in Mexico
Protecting Marine Ecosystems in Mexico
Protecting Marine Ecosystems in Mexico
Protecting Marine Ecosystems in Mexico
Sand castle challenge
Sand castle challenge

Dear Supporters, 

 

Start of 2020 and the Puerto Morelos team is in full conservation and restoration mode.  We have received 29 participants for the marine conservation program so far this quarter and are looking forward to receiving more participants the rest of the year. 

 

So far, our participants have been giving hands on collaboration on the tank and laboratory maintenance of 500 coral heads from 12 different species. Taking care of the young corals and helping them grow so they can be transplanted to reef nurseries.  Helping our partners in the coral restoration project from CRIP with 196.5 work hours.

 

But lab work is not the only thing we are doing in Puerto Morelos, our participants have been undergoing training on dive related topics to better their diving skills and become sustainable environmental aware divers. As well as learning reef monitoring methodology. This year we changed from the MBRS synoptic monitoring program methodology to the Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment methodology. Our participants are now trained in identification of specific fish and invertebrate indicator species as well as the coral species. By doing these we are able to work together collecting data that our partners use to assess the health to the reed and make recommendations for the proper use and maintenance of this great ecosystem. 

 

Our participants have also given a hand making sure that our oceans and coasts are cleaner by undertaking weekly beach cleans.  So far collecting a total of 180 kg of diverse debris and separating it into recyclable and non-recyclable as well as in putting our debris collecting data online with our partners of Ocean Conservancy.

 

 In February the team also participated in a sand castle challenge. The idea behind this was to have a sandcastle competition in the beach using only natural materials obtained from the beach. This activity was carried on to create an environmental awareness of the debris on the beach for both tourists and locals who approached the activity but also as a fundraiser to collect funds for the coral restoration project of CRIP. 

 

One of our main partners in Mexico, The Healthy Reef Initiative, had this year’s presentation of the health of the Mesoamerican Reef System. The data collected by our team of participants and staff in 2019 was used to determine the health of this delicate ecosystem. Unfortunately, this year the health of the reef has deteriorated for the first time in 12 years.   Part of the GVI Puerto Morelos team assisted to the presentation of this report that included presentations by several specialists from the government and non-governmental organizations, who talked about the state of the reef and several actions being undertaken to protect, conserve and restore this ecosystem.

 

 The GVI team also got the opportunity for a more personal presentation from the communications officer of The Healthy Reef Initiative, Marisol Rueda Flores. She talked about the current threats for the Mesoamerican Reef System and what actions that organization and their partners, including us, were undertaking to mitigate this negative impacts.

 

We have continued to accomplish many of our goals in collaborating with our in-country partners in the main objective of the conservation of the some of the coral reefs communities of the Mesoamerican Reef System. This quarter being able to advance slowly but constantly toward our main goal of 265 thousand coral heads transplanted to the reef by the year 2022.  Starting the Caribbean King crab marine aquaculture program to restock the natural populations of these reef gardeners who gives such important service to the coral reef. Working toward the installation of another coral nursery in the ocean, this one to be under the sole responsibility of the GVI team, with guidance from the CRIP staff, for its maintenance and well keeping.

 

Also, we are currently working with our in country partners on being able to start a water quality monitoring program to be able to verify the water quality on the sites the corals are going to be relocated. 

 

And this year we are also looking forward to starting a shark tracking project, to gain more valuable information on the ecology of these great ocean predators.

 

 Through these actions we have been able to create a clear picture and conscience of the need to work on the conservation and restoration of this ecosystem. We are still a long way from our long term  objectives but with the generous help from our supporters and donors we can continue working to achieve this objective.

 

As always, all of this wonderful work couldn’t have been accomplished without the help of our supporters and supporters, a great shout out to you all!!! Thank you!!!

 

With Gratitude,

 

Mexico Marine

Healthy reef initiative
Healthy reef initiative
Beach clean ups
Beach clean ups
Working with coral heads in the lab
Working with coral heads in the lab
Science in water training
Science in water training
Coral tanks in the lab
Coral tanks in the lab
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Team in Chinchorro bank doing conch shell studies
Team in Chinchorro bank doing conch shell studies

Dear Supporters,

 

Coral reef conservation and restoration is our main objective in the Marine Conservation program of Puerto Morelos, which goes hand in hand with the number 14 sustainable development goal of the United Nations: Life Below Water “Careful management of this essential global resource”. 

 

This last Quarter, 21 volunteers joined us in the GVI Puerto Morelos HUB to make a difference in the protection and restoration of the coral reef ecosystem. Daily our volunteers participated in laboratory activities for the Coral Restoration Program of our in country partner the Regional Research Centre for Fisheries and Aquaculture (CRIAP). Achieving a total of 478 hours of manpower collaborating with our partners with the daily activities in the laboratory. 

 

Besides the laboratory work, our team got several opportunities to collaborate with our partners in several activities in the field: 

 

-October 16, Conch Shell population evaluation in Chinchorro Bank. 

 

-November 25, In situ coral fragmentation or cloning and relocation as well as coral nursery maintenance in the reef of Contoy Island. 

 

-December 2, In situ coral fragmentation or cloning and relocation as well as coral nursery maintenance in the reef of Cancun. #

 

Apart from helping our partners, volunteers learned about the coral reef ecosystem, it’s inhabitants and the hazards they face. The got to have a first-hand look of this sublime ecosystem while either learning of the different species of coral that form this leaving underwater cities and its diseases or the different species of fish that are associated with them reef ecosystem and that are used as indicators of reef health. 

 

 

Nine of the volunteers surpassing the learning challenge and being able to collect data of the health of the coral reef for our partners to use in the divulgation of the current state of this ecosystem and to use as a baseline for the proper management of the coral reefs. 

 

With all this work, our team of staff and volunteers still found time to undertake a fundraising challenge, Rally for the Reef on November 8. Joining in in several teams, tackling different challenges that culminated in a massive beach clean up in one of Puerto Morelos beaches. With all of this our volunteers were able to raise $1’068 USD which will be used to help our in country partner buy materials and equipment they gravely need to continue with the coral restoration program. With previous fund the Puerto Morelos team was able to help our in country partner training and certifying their staff in Emergency First Responder skills as well as help them acquire diving insurance for their members to continue doing the amazing work of restoring the coral reefs. 

 

With the generous help from our supporters and donors all of this wonderful work couldn’t have been accomplished without your help. A great shout out to you all!!!

 

Thank you!!! 

 

With Gratituide,

 

Mexico Marine

The Dock at Chinchorro bank
The Dock at Chinchorro bank
The reef at Isla Contoy
The reef at Isla Contoy
The winning team!
The winning team!
Volunteers and staff hard at work
Volunteers and staff hard at work
Volunteers in Isla Contoy
Volunteers in Isla Contoy
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Coral Nurseries
Coral Nurseries

The Mesoamerican coral reef is under constant threat by different factors. In GVI’s Puerto Morelos HUB with its Marine Conservation Program staff, volunteers and interns collaborate with our in country partners by collecting reef ecosystem data and doing hands on coral restoration.

With hard but fun work, we have strengthened our participation with our local partners. 52 volunteers have so far been able to experience life in the Mexican Caribbean and generate a positive impact in marine conservation of the part of the Mesoamerican reef in the locality.

We have participated with volunteers and staff doing 180 laboratory hours working in coral fragmentation and juvenile coral maintenance during this last quarter. Preparing the young corals to be replanted in the reef.  All this work was done side by side with researchers and staff from the regional fisheries and aquaculture research center (CRIAP), our main in country partner.

Our team has also carried on 8 dive trips to the coral nurseries installed in Cancun and Isla Mujeres to do maintenance of the structures and plant new corals in the nurseries. All of these activities were done with the personal from the commission of natural protected areas (CONANP), the federal authority in Mexican in charge of the conservation of the coral reef ecosystem. 

On the 26th of July, a Mexican navy ship dropped anchor on top of the coral reef outside of the limits of the national park. The incident was due to miscommunication between the harbour master and the ship’s captain. The anchor and its chain caused damaged to considerable area of the coral reef known locally as the “Acuario” (aquarium in Spanish). Our superb and committed team of divers was asked by the marine national park administration to collaborate with their personal in assessing the damage to the reef, cementing broken fragments of corals back into the reef and tagging this corals to be able to do a follow up monitoring of the area.  GVI’s marine conservation team will be leading the monitoring activity to assess the restoration process of this area of the reef.

August 29th, our some members of our team also got a change to collaborate in a massive coral planting activity in Isla Mujeres’s Garrafon reef area. One staff member and two volunteers worked in conjunction with 36 other divers in this massive conservation activity in which each diver got to do two dives with the main objective of cementing new corals in this area of the reef.

We continue to accomplish a lot of our goals in collaborating with our in country partners in the main objective of the conservation of the some of the coral reefs communities of the Mesoamerican Reef System. Helping out in the field and laboratory activities of conservation and restoration of this wonderful marine ecosystem. Specially by being able to get our volunteers involved hands on different tasks that are involved in the process of conservation and restoration. GVI’s Puerto Morelos marine conservation program has accomplished several goals all oriented to the long term objective of restoring and conserving this amazing ecosystem. But the most important part, giving our volunteers and people from the local community an opportunity to learn about the coral reef ecosystem, its importance economically, socially and environmentally.

Through these actions we have been able to create a clear picture and conscience of the need to work on the conservation and restauration of this ecosystem. We still have a long way to travel to be able to accomplish our goals. The coral reef restauration program has an ambitious objective of transplanting 260’000 new corals by the year 2020.  We are still a long way from this objective but with the generous help from our supporters and donors we can continue working to achieve this objective.

As always, all of this wonderful work couldn’t have been accomplished without the help of our supporters and supporters, a great shout out to you all!!! Thank you!!! 

Miguel Angel Lozano Huguenin

Mexico Marine Conservation Program Manager

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Dear Supporters, 

On January 12, 2019, the GVI Puerto Morelos base officially started operations. Receiving volunteers and interns from around the world that arrive to collaborate with the ongoing Mesoamerican coral reef conservation and restoration project.

Continuing work with our in country partner CRIP (Regional Research Center of fisheries), this quarter we have strengthen our collaboration by initiating activities  in our new base inside the installations of CRIP in Puerto Morelos. So far 28 volunteers have had the opportunity to create a positive impact while collaborating with the ongoing coral reef restauration program of our partners. Staff and volunteers daily have an opportunity to collaborate in the laboratory phase of the program, carrying on coral cloning through fragmentation and helping out in the maintenance of the small coral colonies in laboratory while they reach the size required for them to be transferred to the coral nurseries in the ocean. Some of the same volunteers and staff have also had the great opportunity to help out in the maintenance of the coral nurseries on the ocean, transplanting coral fragments to the nurseries and monitoring the development of the corals in the nurseries.

All of this work has been carried on besides the coral reef ecosystem monitoring that we undertake. Volunteers undertook science training and so far our team has been able to monitor 2 different sites using the Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment (AGGRA) system.  The data collected thought this monitoring activities is transmitted to our in country partners (CRIP, HR, CONANP) to help them determine the health of the reef ecosystem and assist them on management decisions for this ecosystem.

Also, on the 7 of March, the GVI team took on the Coral thon fundraising event. Volunteers and staff participated in a fun and demanding, bicycle, obstacle race and beach cleaning to raise funds to buy laboratory equipment needed buy our country partners for the coral reef restauration program. Through this activities, we show our commitment to the restauration of the Mesoamerican coral reef and its conservation.

We have accomplished a lot of our goals in collaborating with our in country partners in the main objective of the conservation of the some of the coral reefs communities of the Mesoamerican Reef System. Helping out in the field and laboratory activities in the process of conserving this wonderful marine ecosystem. Specially by being able to get our volunteers involved hands on different tasks that are involved in this process of conservation, but the most important part, giving our volunteers and people from the local community an opportunity to learn about the coral reef ecosystem, its importance economically, socially and environmentally. Through these actions we have been able to create a clear picture and conscience of the need to work on the conservation and restauration of this ecosystem. We still have a long way to travel to be able to accomplish our goals. The coral reef restauration program has an ambitious objective of transplanting 260’000 new corals by the year 2020.  We are still a long way from this objective but with the generous help from our supporters and donors we can continue working to achieve this objective.

As always, all of this wonderful work couldn’t have been accomplished without the help of our supporters and supporters, a great shout out to you all!!! Thank you!!!

Mexico Marine

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Dear Supporters, 

The Mesoamerican Reef System is the second largest coral reef system in the world. And it has shown an alarming rate of degradation (loss of biodiversity, loss biomass, etc) in the last years due to factors such as climate change, coastal development and mass tourism with non-sustainable practices. GVI’s Marine Conservation Program has helped NGOs and federal institutions in this last quarter by collecting data to be used to create options for  proper natural resource management through reef monitoring using the SAM synoptic in the Akumal Bays areas as well as  carrying on maintenance activities for coral nurseries in the same area for coral restauration. And participating directly in the coral restauration project in the laboratory coral cloning part of the project.

In the last quarter, volunteers and staff of GVI’s Mexico Marine Conservation program, committed with the goals of coral reef conservation and restauration, have been able to monitor the health status of 6 of the 14 monitoring sites of the coral reef system in the Akumal bays area. Carrying out 60 fish transects, identifying 487 adult fish and 217 juvenile fish species. Also doing 15 coral transects, identifying 413 coral colonies and their health status. All this data collected during this dives was passed on to our in country partner CEA (Centro Ecologico Akumal) for their statistical analysis of the health of the reef ecosystem. CEA has a 15 year history as an NGO in the Mexican Caribbean region developing and undertaking different various projects for the conservation and sustainable use of the marine natural resources in the region. With this information, CEA was able to create a digital map, in coordination with the NGO Healthy Reef for Healthy People (another in country partner), of the state of health of the coral reef ecosystem to be able to bring into attention to the general public and the proper authorities the condition of the reef ecosystem and some of the mayor challenges to be surpassed to conserve this natural resource for future generations.  

Volunteers and staff from GVI also participated in a lionfish eradication activity on which 15 lionfish were captured. This activity was promoted by the national committee for natural protected areas (part of the Mexican federal government) as part of the state’s local conservation week program and GVI was involved through our in country partner CEA.

In November, data on coral bleaching and coral diseases was collected using the Bar-Drop methodology. This survey is conducted annually by another in country partner, Healthy Reef for Healthy people. Together with CEA, 6 different sites were monitored, more than 200 coral colonies on each site. This way, our in country partners were able to determine the coral bleaching levels and the presence of coral diseases in the ecosystem.

During the first week of December the pilot project for macro algae removal and coral restauration was introduced by Healthy Reefs for Healthy People and CEA. The main objective of this project is to study the effects of macro algae on the development of the reef, more specifically their effect on coral recruitment and coral colony growth. The baseline for this project consisted in 3 initial replicas in which a 30 meter transect was divided into 6 areas for different interventions of macroalgae removal and coral outplant. GVI collaborated strongly in the establishment of 2 out of the 3 replicas in which more than 15 volunteers helped out in 3 dives. 90% of the first replica was achieved and 50 % of the second one.

During the months of October and November we collaborated with CRIP (Regional Fisheries Research Center) in the micro fragmenting process of the coral restauration project and maintenance of the coral nurseries. 2 or 3 times a week 4 volunteers and a staff member went to help in the labs either with the cleaning of tanks or with the microfragmenting process itself. In total around 35 pairs of hands went to help out making more than 6,000 microfragments. On two occasions GVI personal also helped out our CRIPs personal with the cleaning and redistribution of coral fragments in Cancun, in this effort one volunteer and two staff members contributed in 4 different dives

The economic, social and environmental importance of the coral reef ecosystem has brought together a smorgasbord of organizations involved on different projects focused on the conservation of this wonderful natural resource. Yet, the challenges ahead are still many to be able to accomplish a proper conservation, sustainable use and efficient restoration of the coral reefs. A lack of materials and personal, both in the NGO’s and government agencies involved in this activity has created a permanent issue to be able to accomplish these goals. GVI, through our efforts, has helped both in field work as well as in generating a fundraising event through which volunteers were able to raise $1’700 USD that were used to buy dive equipment for two of our in country partners, CEA and Healthy Reef for Healthy People, so they can continue on their honorable tasks of conserving the coral reef ecosystem.

With these actions, GVI works toward the Global Goals for Sustainable Development of the United Nations of Climate Action, Life Below Water and Partnership for the Goals.

We have accomplished a lot of our goals in collaborating with our in country partners in the main objective of the conservation of the some of the coral reefs communities of the Mesoamerican Reef System. Helping out in the field and laboratory activities in the process of conserving this wonderful marine ecosystem. Specially by being able to get our volunteers involved hands on different tasks that are undertaken in this process of conservation, but the most important part, giving our volunteers and people from the local community an opportunity to learn about the coral reef ecosystem and its importance. Through these actions we have been able to create a clear picture and conscience of the need to work on the conservation and restauration of this ecosystem. We still have a long way to travel to be able to accomplish our goals. This coming year we will be working closer with our in country partners CRIP offering them all our help and commitment to reach their conservation goals in the coral reef restoration project. With the generous help from our supporters and donors we can continue working on the conservation, restauration and sustainable use of the coral reefs in the Mexican Caribbean for the enjoyment of future generations.

As always, all of this wonderful work couldn’t have been accomplished without the help of our supporters and supporters, a great shout out to you all!!! Thank you!!!

With Gratitude, 

GVI Akumal 

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Global Vision International Charitable Trust

Location: London - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Daniel Sitarenios
Exeter, Devin United Kingdom

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.