Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya

by Sadhana Forest Kenya
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Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Joyful
Joyful

At last, it rained!  Here in Samburu County Kenya, we recently had the biggest rainfall in four years.  It provided enough water to fill the catchment ponds which hadn’t happened since the beginning of this drought.  Although it’s now been a couple of weeks since the rainfall, all of the surrounding vegetation is still green.  We’re making sure to savour this scenery knowing that that amount of rain will not likely happen again soon; the forecast predicts below average precipitation for the remainder of the year.  Nevertheless, we know that with the help of our water truck we can keep moving forward with planting food-bearing trees.  Our truck is fitted with all the supplies we need for planting trees farther afield – it is our Mobile Reforestation Unit.

We have long been looking forward to planting trees and providing training in more remote communities but the hardships of the recent years made the expansion of our services extremely challenging.  However, we recently scouted locations for future food forest projects and made encouraging connections with numerous communities as far away as Lake Turkana in the north of Kenya.  Several of these locations have the potential to become highly productive food forests in that they are unique micro-climates nestled in rainy mountain valleys; like oases surrounded by desert.  Other regions we visited are suffering from debilitating arid conditions where we will focus on designing intense water conservation systems and planting small and productive food forests.  We are keen on catering each project to the needs of the people where they live.  Our goal is to begin collaborations before the end of the year.

Thank you to all of our volunteers, donors, and everyone at GlobalGiving!  If you would like to provide feedback, learn more about our projects, or if you are interested in volunteering with us, please email us at kenya@sadhanaforest.org.  There is also an opportunity to leave a note at the end of this report.

Ashe Oleng! (“Thank you very much!” in Kisamburu)

Drought
Drought
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Lark and School
Lark and School

We are so excited to report that a full week of rain recently fell here in Samburu County; the most in over two years!  It was a celebratory time seeing the wild grasses and foliage lush and green.  Although it is once again parched, we are left with the optimistic reminder of how quickly these landscapes can recuperate.  It continues to be the worst drought and food crisis in Kenya’s recent history.  We at Sadhana Forest Kenya (SFK) continue planting and caring for drought-resistant food-bearing trees because little by little, tree by tree, we are helping regenerate Earth and establish long term food security in Samburu, Kenya.

During March and April (local students’ time off between academic levels) three different school groups came to stay at SFK for two-week work experience programs.  There were 20 students in each mixed-gender group; two secondary school groups and one of recent high school graduates.  Every student received training in Permaculture and dryland tree-planting techniques.  Subsequently, they put their newly acquired skills into practice on projects at the SFK Community Agro-Forestry Learning Centre as well as out in the Samburu community.  These keen young people had a great time while learning, gaining work experience, and participating hands-on in environmental conservation and food security projects.  Hosting such programs nurtures the meaningful relationship between SFK and the youth of Samburu.  This up-and-coming generation is empowered to move towards their future knowing that they determine the sustainability of their livelihoods.

It brings us great joy to let you know SFK continues to be a haven for Kenyan animals during these times of drought.  The elephants have stayed close and even welcomed a number of newborns into the world!  Birds, antelopes, a variety of small mammals, and even a leopard have been spotted nearby.  We are honored to have this motley of wildlife grace us with their company.

This crucial work is made possible with the support of volunteers, donors, and GlobalGiving; thank you all!  If you would like to provide feedback, learn more about our projects, or if you are interested in volunteering with us, please email us at kenya@sadhanaforest.org.  There is also an opportunity to leave a note at the end of this report.

Ashe Oleng! (“Thank you very much!” in Kisamburu)

School Group
School Group
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Watering
Watering

We are very happy to report that as covid-19 restrictions are easing, we are able to resume our larger outreach programs. For example, at one local school in nearby Lodokejek area, the senior students have been actively caring for close to 50 trees on their school’s grounds. They have chosen it as their goal to create their own tree nursery, expand the tree planting, and turn the bare grounds into a forest. It is inspiring to work with such enterprising and determined young people.

Recently, we have also started a collaboration with a women’s jewellery-making collective in a neighbouring village called Naiborkeju. Now that they’ve seen their business generate income and transform their lives, they want to transform their environment as well. Their goal is to grow their own food and create a more habitable and nourishing place to live, work, raise their families, and thrive. In doing so, they will be more self-reliant and less dependent on government and foreign aid. This is yet another inspiring example of hard-working people who want the best for their home. We are so excited to support these groups every step of the way with their ambitious and important projects.

Although the last few months we have faced continued drought with tree-nibbling elephants, we know it will get better. We are seeing weather forecasts of at least average levels of precipitation on the way. It will take several of such seasons to fully recover from the drought’s damage, but it will bring relief to people, vegetation, and wildlife. It also means the local elephants will have more sources of food! Fortunately, they haven't caused much damage to the trees we planted, and those trees that were "trimmed" will grow back stronger. In the meantime, we are so grateful to have such a high-capacity water truck. It has allowed us to continue planting trees and delivering water in these times of severe drought – it is a lifesaver!

Thank you to all of our volunteers, donors, and everyone who supports us in any way. Thank you to GlobalGiving for this platform on which to reach you all! As always, if you are interested in providing feedback concerning our project, learning more about our activities/operations, or would like to volunteer with us, please email us at kenya@sadhanaforest.org. There is also an opportunity to provide feedback at the end of this report.

Ashe Oleng! (“Thank you very much!” in Kisamburu)

Lodokejek School
Lodokejek School
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Ready to Plant
Ready to Plant

Two months ago, dozens of elephants began residing in the area of Sadhana Forest Kenya.  Interestingly, they are a different herd than those who occasionally pass by.  It is suspected that they have come from far away due to the devastating drought continuing to afflict East Africa.  We are currently experiencing the third failed rainy season in a row and there is zero precipitation predicted for the foreseeable future.  This drought has come only three years since the previous one, whereas historically, drought cycles were 5-7 years.  These jeopardizing effects of climate change make our work far more challenging and prove how critical it is that we carry on towards the goal of long-term food security for Samburu.

We focus on fostering a balanced co-existence with our new (respectably hulking, but lovable) elephant neighbours, continue to deliver 18,000 litres of water daily to people, provide free phone charging and additional water through the taps at our center, and of course, plant and care for drought-resistant food-bearing trees.

We are so grateful to be able to provide essential, life-saving services during these crises.  We couldn’t do it without your support; THANK YOU!  A special shout out to everyone who donated on GivingTuesday!  We are so grateful for your support.  And thank you to GlobalGiving for the endless support, resources, and opportunities that help us do this work!

If you haven’t donated yet, but would still like to do so before the end of the year, right now is the perfect time to start a monthly recurring donation!  If you set it up by December 17th 2021, your first donation will get matched at 200%!  Please see the terms and conditions.

If you are interested in providing us feedback concerning our project, finding out more about our activities or areas of operation, or would like to volunteer with us, please email us at kenya@sadhanaforest.org.  We also strongly encourage you to provide feedback at the end of this report.

Ashe Oleng! (“Thank you very much!” in Kisamburu)

Resident Elephants
Resident Elephants
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Naisherua
Naisherua

In this project update, we’d like to share with you Naisherua’s story. Naisherua is a local resident of Samburu County, a tree recipient of Sadhana Forest Kenya (SFK) and an invaluable addition to our team!

Naisherua lives near SFK in a village called Lkisheki. She lives with her father, step-mother, and younger half-siblings. She is a mother of two; her daughter is 3 years old and lives with her, while her son is 6 and lives far away with his grandmother.

When Naisherua was 15 years old, her mother passed away. Her father was often away for work, and his new girlfriend began to mistreat her. Naisherua was neglected at home, only receiving food at school. Any money she earned from odd jobs was taken by her father’s girlfriend. By the time she reached high school, Naisherua was often sick and eventually had to withdraw from her studies. After her father remarried someone else, Naisherua helped care for her new siblings and soon got married herself. Over the following few years she had continuous struggles. Her husband was rarely employed and drank too much alcohol, so she became the sole provider for her own growing family. She worked for others until she started her own small business, but her husband then demanded they move to another town, to live there with his mother. By the time Naisherua had her second child, she was out of work, unable to afford food or her son’s school fees, and her new baby was sick. She had enough. She ran away with her baby and was welcomed back into her father’s home.

Naisherua recently started helping out at SFK. She says she has learned so much and that she has proven she can do anything men can do. She’s learned to use power tools and is involved in all kinds of projects in which she had no previous experience. She loves that SFK never limits her because she is a woman. She is treated as an equal and all the men see her as a strong person. This has made her feel truly empowered for the first time in her life. She has taken what she has learned at SFK and implemented it in her father’s home. She no longer has to buy many vegetables because she can now harvest them from the small food-forest that she herself created. She is fully providing for herself, helping to support her younger siblings, and able to send her children to school, which is very important for her.

Naisherua’s dream is to one day have her very own home and to be able to bring her son to live with her. SFK made her feel, for the first time, that her dream is possible. She says her goal is to be “free” and that Sadhana Forest Kenya brings freedom to women and families.

Thank you for supporting Sadhana Forest Kenya! If you are interested in providing us feedback concerning our project, finding out more about our activities or areas of operation, or would like to volunteer with us, please email us at kenya@sadhanaforest.org. We also strongly encourage you to provide feedback at the end of this report.

Ashe Oleng! (“Thank you very much!” in Kisamburu)

Naisherua's Trees
Naisherua's Trees
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Organization Information

Sadhana Forest Kenya

Location: Kisima - Kenya
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Aviram Rozin
Kisima, Kenya
$209,174 raised of $294,338 goal
 
2,375 donations
$85,164 to go
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