Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya

by Sadhana Forest Kenya
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Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Long-Term Food Security for 4000 Samburus in Kenya
Susan, Resinoi, and Lark celebrate!
Susan, Resinoi, and Lark celebrate!

Since our last report, we have held eleven more tree-planting training sessions. We've had significant involvement at local schools where the youth have perfected our tree planting technique and will continue to plant many more trees in the upcoming months. Our three-month follow up care and training has already been completed for the majority of the trees planted with an impressive 84% survival rate.

This glowing success is attributed to the significant energy dedicated to each step leading up to the trees' check-up date - from germination and community outreach to planting and follow-up communications. Our tree recipients are held accountable for each tree they accept into their care. They are so invested and devoted to their trees due to high quality education and coaching they receive from our passionate trainers and outreach team. Each member of our team has fire in their hearts for Sadhana Forest Kenya and gets fueled up with each opportunity to share that flame with their neighbours. Their faith and motivation come from witnessing the perseverance of Sadhana Forest and the vigor of each volunteer who comes to give their energy to the trees and Samburu people.

As our volunteers connect and strengthen relationships within the community, we are welcomed time and time again to visit our neighbours' homes. From being invited into their manyatta (hut) for a cup of tea after the heavy work of tree planting, to insisting we attend a full three-day wedding ceremony with their family, we are so grateful to be embraced by the Samburu people.

And we are so grateful for our volunteers and the support from the Global Giving community. If you are interested in providing us further feedback concerning our project, finding out more about our activities or area of operation, or would like to volunteer with us, please contact us here or email us directly at kenya@sadhanaforest.org. We also strongly encourage you to provide feedback at the end of this report.

Ashe Oleng! (Thank you very much in Kisamburu)

Tree planting at school
Tree planting at school
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Tuta
Tuta

His name is Tuta.  He is kind, peaceful, and gentle and he has been a part of Sadhana Forest Kenya since we settled in Samburu County in 2014.

Before Sadhana Forest Kenya, Tuta focused on looking after cows and goats, of which he has 5 and 7, respectively. He lives in a village called "Loltuleilei", next to a forest - or what used to be a forest.  He says it disappeared about 30 years ago. The trees were used up for construction and the vegetation was eaten by livestock. With population growth, humans and their animals have consumed more and more of the forest.

Now, Tuta continuously applies what he learns at Sadhana Forest Kenya in his own home and his livelihood has improved. He relies less on having livestock and tends to his land more efficiently through Permaculture (sustainable agriculture) methods. He grows more of his own food and has planted 7 food-bearing trees at his home; the tallest is now a full metre in height. He has inspired the people from his village to understand the importance of planting trees and bringing the forest back; they are eager to do so!

Tuta is happy to be a part of Sadhana Forest Kenya and would like to thank all of our supporters. He is witnessing first-hand the good that we are doing; creating a forest by planting trees at everyone's homes. We are so grateful for the dedication of our friend, Tuta, who's gentle nature could tame a lion.

And we are so grateful for our volunteers and the support from the Global Giving community. If you are interested in providing us further feedback concerning our project, finding out more about our activities or area of operation, or would like to volunteer with us, please contact us here or email us directly at kenya@sadhanaforest.org.  We also strongly encourage you to provide feedback at the end of this report.

Ashe Oleng! (Thank you very much in Kisamburu)

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Susan (photo by B.Brewer)
Susan (photo by B.Brewer)

Back in November, we reported in the midst of our journey with germinating Moringa stenopetala seedlings.  Now, we can happily tell you that these little ones have made their way; planted in the earth to grow under the care of our recipients! 

In just the last few months we have held ten tree-planting training sessions, attended by 257 people.  And, we have already planted trees at every one of those 257 participants’ homes!  Many have received our Moringa seedlings.  Because of its ability to mitigate malnutrition and increase breast milk production, we mainly have focused on getting this “Mothers’ Helper” to new mothers.  It has been received positively and enthusiastically; word has spread through the Community Health Outreach program about all the amazing benefits of Moringa, as well as how soon after planting the leaves can be harvested and used.

Another tree our recipients are eager to plant is Dovyalis caffra which produces the “Kei apple”.  Although it is a local species and, with its impressive thorns, known for making a decent protective hedge, few people are knowledgeable about how to use the fruit it produces.  So to each training session, we’re now bringing along recipes and our homemade samples of kei apple products; jam and spicy pickle!  With this new found confidence in its taste and preparation, many more people are choosing to plant the very hardy and drought-resistant Dovyalis.  While training our recipients, we really have discovered the importance of emphasizing the benefits of our fruit-bearing trees.  We see a huge shift in motivation once a family realizes the possibilities of these trees despite the wait time for its harvest.

We are thankful for early and continuous rains this year giving growth to our trees and vegetation at Sadhana Forest Kenya.  We are lush with flora and fauna, and happy volunteers!

We are so grateful for our volunteers and the support from the Global Giving community.  If you are interested in providing us further feedback concerning our project, finding out more about our activities or area of operation, or would like to volunteer with us, please contact us here or email us directly at kenya@sadhanaforest.org.  We also strongly encourage you to provide feedback at the end of this report.


Ashe Oleng! (Thank you very much in Kisamburu)

Helping Hands (photo by B.Brewer)
Helping Hands (photo by B.Brewer)
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Susan
Susan

Susan is a shining light and a tireless promoter of trees in her work with Sadhana Forest Kenya.  With her perpetual joy and enthusiasm, you would never assume what challenges she has had to overcome to get here.  Taken out of school to marry when she was just barely 14 years old, she spent the early days of her marriage playing "house" and imaginative games with her younger brothers-in-law.  Then, when she was 18 and already pregnant with her third child, her husband was tragically killed.  Susan found herself with no possessions or money and three young children to raise on her own.  According to Samburu tradition, women may not remarry if their husbands die.  Little by little, Susan began to create a home and life for her family; first, by building a house and homestead where she would later welcome her mother and many of her siblings to live, and later, by engaging the community as a catechist for the Catholic Church, a job for which she earned roughly 20USD per month.  Even as she lost siblings and loved-ones to various illnesses and accidents, she remained committed to uplifting and promoting her larger community – transforming countless lives.  Barley living above poverty herself, she used every resource she had to support others, helping them rise from helplessness to engaged and participating members of their community.  Beyond her work for the church, Susan volunteered, and continues to serve, as a Community Health Volunteer.  She later worked in the local hospital, treating the physical and spiritual health of her neighbours.  She sees working with Sadhana Forest Kenya and for the environment as a natural next step for her. After all, the health of nature and the environment have vital roles to play in sustaining the health and future of the Samburu people.


In the year and a half that Susan has so far worked with Sadhana Forest Kenya, she quickly took on the role of Community Engagement and Training; doing what she does best, which is inspiring people to transform their lives and their environment. On a typical day, she awakens at dawn to arrange the small shop she runs out of her home, light the fire to cook breakfast, and help her mother. She then takes her youngest daughter to school before coming to the Sadhana Forest Kenya campus to finish loading up the van for a day in the field. In the mornings, she organizes a team of workers who prepare the areas where trees will be planted later in the day. When there is a tree-planting training for locals, Susan is the one who conducts it.  She does the follow-up home visits of our tree recipients, making sure everything is clear about how to care for their trees and offer encouragement and advice. She teaches with laughter and metaphors that are relevant and understandable. Susan returns to Sadhana Forest Kenya for lunch before heading back out in the afternoon to plant the trees, deliver water, and record data. At home, a line of people are waiting at her shop window. Evening chores extend until after dark.  Susan is thrilled that she is able to work so close to home, spending her mornings and evenings with her family. She loves incorporating environmental health into her experience and rounding out the life she has built from scratch.


Here at SFK, we finished 2017 and began 2018 full strength, holding three trainings attended by over 100 people.  We’ve already planted almost 200 trees this year!


We are so grateful for our volunteers and the support from the Global Giving community.  If you are interested in providing us further feedback concerning our project, finding out more about our activities or area of operation, or would like to volunteer with us, please contact us here or email us directly at kenya@sadhanaforest.org.  We also strongly encourage you to provide feedback at the end of this report.


Ashe Oleng! (Thank you very much in Kisamburu)

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Moringa Seedlings
Moringa Seedlings

During times of drought, the semi-nomadic Samburu tend to migrate to areas with better prospects of grazing for their herds.  Now, with enough consistent rain, our neighbours are making their way back to their homes and our surrounding communities are again more populated and lively.

Here at Sadhana Forest Kenya, we’ve been working on finding an optimal method of germinating Moringa stenopetala to ensure the seedlings are off to the best possible start. The goal is to plant a Moringa tree at each and every one of our beneficiaries’ homes. The Moringa is an exceptional tree!  Its leaves are highly nutritious and can be harvested almost immediately.  They can go a long way in mitigating anaemia in children, which is a big problem in our area.  Also, Moringa is nicknamed “Mother’s Helper” as it has been found to increase breast milk production.

After some experimentation, we developed a planting method with great potential, but we had another challenge plaguing us; baboons and francolins! A francolin is a fowl-like bird. We needed to protect our nurseries from the damage little claws and naughty paws were doing to our tender trees.  Success!  We have now produced many hundreds of happy seedlings in an animal-proof nursery.  We foresee commencing their distribution by the year’s end.

We are so grateful for our volunteers and the support from the Global Giving community.  If you are interested in providing us further feedback concerning our project, finding out more about our activities or area of operation, or would like to volunteer with us, please contact us here or email us directly at kenya@sadhanaforest.org.  We also strongly encourage you to provide feedback at the end of this report.

Ashe Oleng! (Thank you very much in Kisamburu)

Animal-Proof Tree Nursery
Animal-Proof Tree Nursery
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Organization Information

Sadhana Forest Kenya

Location: Kisima - Kenya
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Aviram Rozin
Kisima, Kenya
$206,675 raised of $294,338 goal
 
2,304 donations
$87,663 to go
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