Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo

by Borneo Orangutan Survival UK Ltd
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo
Help to Monitor and Protect Orangutans in Borneo

Thanks to your wonderful support, the BOS Foundation Post Release Monitoring (PRM) team in the Bukit Batikap Protection Forest continues to monitor orangutans and collect data from the camera traps, and it is always exciting to see the results.

Recently the orangutans didn’t disappoint and we are delighted to share these images of female orangutan Gina as she decided to “investigate” one of the cameras. Wild animal interference with remote cameras is an issue that all researchers’ using camera traps experience. Some species are renowned for their enthusiastic interest in cameras and in some countries that is often bears. In our case, many different species take an interest in the cameras and sometimes try to move them.

Reintroduced orangutans also sometimes take a keen interest and this is because they have been rehabilitated by human caregivers and have less fear of new objects compared to wild orangutans. We anticipated this and each camera is housed in a strong steel security box and secured with a python cable. We have also tried different ways of camouflaging the cameras, which is harder than it sounds because camouflage materials can get in the way of the camera lens and this can cause the camera to continually misfire and take images of whatever is in its way.

Gina, who was released into Batikap in April 2016, spotted one of the cameras and made her way purposely towards it. The camera documented over 20 minutes of her time spent systematically “investigating” it. Fortunately, she couldn’t open the security box to access the back of the camera and we were able to retrieve the SD memory card and watch the entire sequence of her antics. Another of the cameras was also an apparently interesting item to investigate and the unidentified orangutan in this case had actually peeled away the bottom of the steel security box the camera was secured in - that is how strong these orangutans are!

Nonetheless, and despite these occasional hiccups, the cameras can be fixed or replaced thanks to your wonderful support and they can continue to provide us with these incredible insights and images of the orangutans and so many other species.

We’ll continue to report back with our new findings and in the meantime, we hope you enjoy these photo’s of Gina and some of the other forest dwellers who are intrigued with the cameras!

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Sun Bear
Sun Bear

Thanks to your amazing support, we are getting closer to our goal! Thank you to you all and we are excited to share an update with you on our project in the Bukit Batikap Protection Forest!


The BOS Foundation Post Release Monitoring (PRM) team have been busy collecting data from the cameras.

One of our highlights has to be these images of relatively new mother, Manggo, together with her baby Melki! Manggo was released on Valentine’s Day in 2013 as a 7ish year-old, together with her mother Markisa and baby brother Uli. After her release, Manggo quickly gained her independence and 8 years later we are delighted to see her with her own baby. Both are very healthy and undoubtedly Manggo is a great Mum to curious little Melki. In case you were wondering the name Melki comes from our former PRM Coordinator at Batikap who was instrumental in helping to set up our camera trap project. Thank you Melki and it looks like Manggo and your namesake dropped by one of the cameras to say thank you too!


We have a few more orangutans on camera that we are still trying to identify and we are pretty sure that one or two of them might be orangutans we released with their mothers when they were still young and they are now entering their teenage years. Orangutans’ faces can change quite significantly as they grow up and we are checking back with the babysitters and veterinarians at Nyaru Menteng to see if they can help us identify these individuals.


So many other species have been passing by the cameras and we are busy labeling all of the 223,000 images we have gathered so far. For now we wanted to share a few of those, like these two muntjacs’ who spent ages standing in front of this particular camera grooming each other with gentle licks (kisses). We also captured this image of a clouded leopard and a stunning image of an adult red langur.


As we continue to process all the data, we’ll report back with our latest findings and exciting new images.


Thank you for supporting the protection of our reintroduced orangutans. We couldn’t do it without you!

Sun Bear 2
Sun Bear 2
Muntjacks
Muntjacks
Muntjacks 2
Muntjacks 2
Manggo and baby Melki
Manggo and baby Melki
Python and potential prey
Python and potential prey
Manggo and baby Melki 2
Manggo and baby Melki 2
Red langur
Red langur
Red langur 2
Red langur 2
Clouded leopard
Clouded leopard
Clouded leopard 2
Clouded leopard 2
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Cindy and Stellar 1
Cindy and Stellar 1

A huge thank you to everyone who has given so generously to support our exciting camera trap project and we are delighted to post an update especially for you.

Establishing our camera trap project only days before the global pandemic emerged, we have been incredibly fortunate that the dedicated BOS Foundation Post-Release Monitoring team in the Bukit Batikap Protection Forest (Batikap), has been able to safely continue to monitor the camera traps and retrieve ongoing data on the orangutans and so many other amazing wildlife species. 

As one of our closest living relatives, orangutans are susceptible to all of the same diseases as humans and that includes COVID-19. Camera traps allow us to monitor the progress of the reintroduced orangutans, whilst reducing the risk of disease transmission between humans and orangutans. What better way to continue to study reintroduced orangutans during a global health crisis than by using non-invasive technology!

We have had quite a few visitors to our camera traps including Cindy and her baby Stellar. Cindy was reintroduced into Batikap in November 2013, together with her 6-year old son, Cilik, and 1 year old dependent daughter, Riwut. Cindy is an outstanding mother and once Riwut began to find her independence, Cindy welcomed her third child Stellar in Batikap during January 2019! As you can see from the photos, there is no end to Cindy’s patience and although these aren’t the clearest camera trap images we’ve recorded, we couldn’t resist sharing these photos of Stellar balancing on Cindy’s head! We are very happy to report that mother and daughter continue to flourish in the forest and we hope to catch up with them again soon. 

In the meantime, the data we are gathering from the camera traps on other species found in Batikap is outstanding. Many of these species are incredibly elusive and as a human observer in the forest you would rarely, if ever, have the chance to see them. We are delighted to share some of these images with you including this adorable young sun bear foraging, a young male sambar deer and this cheeky pig-tailed macaque selfie!

We excitedly await new data to arrive and look forward to updating you soon.

Thank you for your support!

Cindy and Stellar 2
Cindy and Stellar 2
Cindy and Stellar 3
Cindy and Stellar 3
Pig-tailed Macaque
Pig-tailed Macaque
Sun bear
Sun bear
Sambar deer
Sambar deer

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Organization Information

Borneo Orangutan Survival UK Ltd

Location: London - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @BorneoOSUK
Project Leader:
Benjamin Callison
London, United Kingdom
$19,576 raised of $30,000 goal
 
183 donations
$10,424 to go
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