Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate

by Fondo Semillas
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Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Protect their Journey #GirlsWhoMigrate
Women of the southern border
Women of the southern border

The organizations continue to strengthen girls’ and women’s[1] knowledge of their own rights. This is critical because it positions them as agents of change in their respective communities. 

For example, Dreamers Moms has conducted workshops on the visa process; Co-libres provides training on the right to seek asylum; Proyecto Taika promotes awareness-raising activities among migrant children and adolescents in shelters; and, through its project “Girls at the microphone,” the MAPAS collective implements workshops among girls and adolescents from day laborer, migrant, and indigenous families to empower their voices.

In addition to the workshops, the beneficiary organizations continue to provide legal accompaniment for family reunification procedures, immigration regularization, shelter, and emotional support, among others. One of their main follow-up topics has been the COVID-19 vaccination for migrants, as well as dignified menstrual processes for girls and young women.

Regarding issues related to technology, Co-libres launched an application called “SoroApp.” This tool can be used by female defenders and migrants to access accurate information for their movements. There are already women who have used the app and it has worked for them.

Sofia, a young Salvadoran woman, is in the process of applying for asylum and has been accompanied to strengthen her knowledge and confidence about her right to asylum. She has also used the application. “We learned that we, as companions and migrants, have rights and now we have an app to help us. With it we will be able to guide ourselves, we are looking for a route and we are going north until we reach Tijuana".

The progress has also been reflected in advocacy issues with justice institutions. The MAPAS Collective has advocated for various government agencies to change their macho practices and attitudes towards victims of violence to guarantee the girls’ and women’s[2] rights. The authorities now pay more attention to victims’ needs and work ethically on their behalf.

Thank you to all who continue to be a part of this community and help us keep supporting organizations that work with girls, adolescents, and women in situations of mobility. Without your help, these advances would not be possible.

 

[1] Both cis and transgender women

[2] Both cis and transgender women

Workshop by Las Vanders
Workshop by Las Vanders
MAPAS Collective
MAPAS Collective
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IMUMI Workshop
IMUMI Workshop

In recent months, the conditions of individuals who continue to arrive in Mexico from Central America in search of a better life have been highly visibilized. This, together with the increased migration flow from the Middle East due to the situation in Afghanistan, has made the work of many organizations dedicated to migration more difficult. Some have continued their efforts to reunify families along the Mexico-US border, although bureaucratic processes have been delayed due to the pandemic. The new government in Mexico is expected to facilitate these processes, but civil society organizations (CSOs) are still struggling with a slow-moving and inefficient bureaucracy.

The situations described have undoubtedly represented new challenges for our partner organizations who use their experience and networks to continue to help girls, women, and youth in transit through Mexico.

This quarter, the Institute for Women in Migration (IMUMI) has carried out various judicial and legal support activities with the migrant population. Such activities have included accompanying the legal process of a one-year-old baby born in Mexico to a Honduran mother so that the mom could receive official documentation, and channeling a 13-year-old Honduran trans adolescent – a victim of violence and sexual assault – to the proper services. Support was also provided to a 17-year-old Honduran teenager who fled the country due to organized crime and seeks to reunite with her mother in the United States.

IMUMI has also provided psycho-emotional support to 8 people, and the organization is handling several litigation cases to permit migrant women to receive the COVID-19 vaccination.

On its end, Dreamer’s Moms continues to aid migrant women with legal procedures for family reunification, in addition to offering training and workshops on migrants’ basic rights. More and more mothers are approaching Dreamer’s Moms. They seek access to legal counsel and psycho-emotional support that will help them in their fight for the right to visit their children while waiting to achieve family reunification in Mexico or the US.

Part of Fondo Semillas’ work is to promote and generate spaces for organizations to network and recently, both IMUMI and Dreamer’s Moms have partnered with Mujeres del Bajío. Together, they will hold the second forum with the Mexican Senate to promote the elimination of bureaucratic procedures that hinder dual citizenship for foreign-born infants.

Together, these organizations have worked on developing messages for the media and have shared experiences of workshops promoting the rights of migrant girls and women, such as ‘U Visa’ workshops.

As always, Fondo Semillas thanks you for your support and hopes that this coming year, we can together continue to work towards the full rights of girls and women in Mexico.

Childrens day
Childrens day
IMUMI Forum
IMUMI Forum
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MAPAS Collective.
MAPAS Collective.

Dear supporters, 

The current context of migration in Mexico, coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic, has undoubtedly increased migrants’ lack of rights and their ability to exercise said civil liberties. Migration flows from Central America to Mexico remain strong despite the fact that neither the minimum nor decent health conditions are provided for this population. Migrant girls, boys, and adolescents continue to be sent to shelters and separated from their families.

Additionally, the situation has become more complex due to recent floods along Mexico’s southern border. Many families have been left homeless and are now exposed to greater health risks, including COVID-19 and water-borne diseases.

Fondo Semillas has financed two organizations in the south of the country using our Rapid Response Fund, which was designed to address emergency situations. Activities include setting up community kitchens, reconstructing damaged homes, and actions to clean and disinfect the affected areas, among others.

Via their activities, all of the migration-related organizations supported by Fondo Semillas have increased the knowledge and exercise of 126 girls’ and 329 women’s rights.

Organizations such as “Las Vanders[1] exemplify the work that’s being done related to migrants’ rights since, every time they support a girl or woman, they also raise their awareness about access to their rights. In this sense, they are trying to strengthen their autonomous process so that these females feel empowered to demand their rights. At the same time, they are encouraged to become promoters within their communities.

This is Marcela’s testimony, a young Honduran who was once a part of Las Vanders’ accompaniment process and who now supports young people from her community so that they can improve their lives: “We’re all the same. Physical appearance doesn’t matter, because in birth and in death, each and every one of use arrives without prejudice or material possessions.”

These awareness-raising processes have also been made possible thanks to greater media coverage of our partner organizations’ work. Las Vanders began and disseminated the campaign: A-bordando la violencia contra todas las mujeres.[2]This led to newspaper and television coverage, including important reflections on activism, migration, and artistic practices.[3]

The MAPAS Collective,[4] through its project Niñas al micrófono,[5] has promoted workshops on the histories of girls and adolescents from families of day laborers, migrants, and indigenous families through recreational activities, exercise, reflection on their human rights, and reaffirmation of their identity.

Their support work for literacy learning processes has had great results, as in the case of Ana, a 10-year-old girl who stopped going to school due to the pandemic and her family’s constant migration. The MAPAS Collective shared that, “Since she [Ana] began her education process, her desire to learn is noticeable and reflected in the sparkle of her eyes and in her smile. Today, her mother wants her daughter to continue studying no matter what.”

Fondo Semillas is very grateful for your contribution, which allows us to continue supporting organizations that work with people on the move. We do this not only via donations and financial backing, but also through opportunities for articulation and collaboration with networks that allow for the exchange of knowledge, learnings, and experiences that strengthen collective work.

 

 

[1] A civil society organization (CSO) that provides legal support to migrant women and their children in addition to strengthening knowledge about the exercise of their rights through art and creative processes.

[2]The name of the campaign is a play on words in Spanish. Abordar means “to address,” “to tackle,” or “to deal with,” and bordar means “to embroider.” Thus, the campaign is referring to Tackling Violence against Women through Embroidery.

[3]https://www.excelsior.com.mx/nacional/bordan-contra-la-violencia-describen-en-cuatro-talleres-la-problematica/1420682; https://rebelion.org/activismo-tambien-es-pasarla-bien/; https://desinformemonos.org/organizaciones-repudian-brutal-represion-contra-caravana-migrante-en-mexico/.

[4] An organization of human rights defenders who work with migrant and indigenous girls and adolescents and their families.

[5]Girls to the Microphone.

MAPAS Collective.
MAPAS Collective.

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Tzome Ixuk
Tzome Ixuk

In the previous report, we described how the organizations we support had to face the most immediate needs derived from the COVID-19 health crisis. At the same time, they continued with their work to defend girl’s and women’s rights following the quarantine.

Over the last few months, these OSCs have made modifications and adjustments to their work plans, focusing more on collective care and mental health support. They’ve also been implementing a transversal axis of ongoing institutional strengthening to keep moving forward so that they can share their knowledge with their communities.

In this regard, the organization DREAMers’ Moms (DM), though its project “Deported Mothers Unemployed due to COVID-19,” has carried out various activities regarding the subject, especially through the media and on social networks. They held three webinars in which participants learned about how to take care of themselves physically and mentally during the quarantine. Likewise, they have created informational materials to disseminate, held interviews, and facilitated conversations with mothers about how to attend to their mental health. This has been particularly significant when they have been denied all communication with their daughters and sons.

DREAMers’ Moms continues to advocate for the reunification of families in the United States, accompanying 30 women with legal advice. Due to the pandemic, it has been difficult to continue with these processes in a timely manner, yet the organization has taken charge of ensuring that the community remains informed via media presence. Three interviews were conducted with women in the group who talked about how to confront family separation during COVID-19. These dialogues are key, as they reach the eyes and ears of their daughters and sons. They have been broadcast on television channels such as Telemundo33 in Sacramento, California, and Síntesis TV, in Baja California, Mexico.

As for Tzome Ixuk (TI), the organization has created a safe refuge for migrant women and their families. COVID-19 has complicated their ability to find employment and rent spaces in the municipality of Las Margaritas, Chiapas. Much of this is due to misinformation, xenophobia, and the rejection of migrants, which has led to increased discrimination. People in the shelter have been staying for longer periods of time while waiting for their immigration procedures to be approved or to be granted international protection.

In addition, Tzome Ixuk has provided workshops on different topics, including collective and self-care, Mexico’s asylum procedure, digital security, violence, and the rights of girls, boys, and adolescents (NNA). This has aided in the creation of an environment of hope and solidarity in the face of the pandemic, which has generated anxiety and fear among the population of Las Margaritas.

One of TI’s most important contributions during this period has been maintaining their refuge space for migrant women and their families. In the future, the organization has contemplated expansion of this space in order to improve its ability to welcome migrants and guarantee dignified spaces that maintain biosafety[1] protocols given the ongoing pandemic.

Every day, these organizations continue to adapt their work strategies and seek new solutions to the resulting challenges of COVID-19. Little by little, they build new networks and strengthen their internal and external processes. In this way, they are able to keep supporting women and girls who migrate.

Thank you for being a part of this community and for your common interest in transforming and improving the lives of girls and women in Mexico. Without you, this would not be possible.

 

 

 

[1]Biosafety is a set of principles, standards, protocols, technologies, and practices that are implemented to avoid the risk to one’s health, along with the resulting environment from exposure to biological agents that produce infections, toxins, allergies, or diseases caused by the aforementioned.

Zoom session DREAMers Moms
Zoom session DREAMers Moms
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Doble Nationality Forum
Doble Nationality Forum

 

During the pandemic and throughout these months, some organizations, Dreamers Moms and Tzome Ixuk have been supporting migrant women, girls, and mothers who have been deported from the US. In order to continue assisting women, Dreamers Moms have been generating dissemination material aimed at women and children to raise awareness on how to deal with family separation during the pandemic crisis. Through these messages on television and radio, they gave support to women and girls who have been separated by their children.

Since the economic impact of the COVID-19 crisis has been disrupting for women, Dreamers Moms have been delivering packages of provisions to more than 30 women who lost their jobs in the last semester. Moreover, they continued to provide legal advisory to women and moms who are still fighting against deportation and injustice at the US Border.

In addition, the organization Tzome Ixuk in Chiapas has been constantly working with migrant women and girls during these months. In the last semester, they supported more than 50 women who have reached Mexico with their families; despite the pandemic, the flow of migrants coming from Central America has been constant and the majority of beneficiaries were coming from Honduras and El Salvador. Tzome Ixuk has been providing legal support and capacity building to help these families with the process of refugee status and give them the tools to recognize their human rights as migrants in Mexico.

In the shelter where they host migrant women and their families, Tzome Ixuk kept providing them with mental health training and self-care practices in order to guide them through the insecurities and uncertainty of the lockdown period.

Testimonies

Julia[1] reached Mexico with her 14-year-old son Alberto, both victims of persecution by criminal gangs in El Salvador. When they arrived in Mexico, they request refugee status and are hosted by Tzome Ixuk in their shelter. With the accompaniment provided and through her participation in training spaces, she managed to obtain refugee status a few months ago. They secured her psychological support and treatment in the local hospital and she now lives happily in Las Margaritas, Chiapas. Julia is only waiting for the delivery of her permanent residence card and then she will decide whether to move further to the north of Mexico or stay in Chiapas.

 

[1] Name change for security reason

Tzome Ixuk
Tzome Ixuk

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Organization Information

Fondo Semillas

Location: Mexico City - Mexico
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @FondoSemillas
Project Leader:
Ana Laura Godinez
Mexico City, Mexico
$19,303 raised of $30,000 goal
 
124 donations
$10,697 to go
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