COVID-19  India Project #46564

Emergency Aid in the Covid pandemic- South Asia

by Mission Bambini
Emergency Aid in the Covid pandemic- South Asia
Emergency Aid in the Covid pandemic- South Asia
Emergency Aid in the Covid pandemic- South Asia
Emergency Aid in the Covid pandemic- South Asia
Emergency Aid in the Covid pandemic- South Asia
Emergency Aid in the Covid pandemic- South Asia
Emergency Aid in the Covid pandemic- South Asia
Emergency Aid in the Covid pandemic- South Asia
Emergency Aid in the Covid pandemic- South Asia
Emergency Aid in the Covid pandemic- South Asia

The pandemic of covid-19 continues to have a huge impact on vulnerable people and particularly on women. According to UNDP, in the second half of 2020, many countries experienced a decrease in the presence of women on the labor market because of social norms and because of the loss of jobs, especially in the informal sector. There is also a resurgence of hyper-masculinity and strong men leadership.

More than ever there is a need to train girls and young women so that they can be adequately prepared to enter the labor market and get income but also to become leaders in their communities.

In many countries, in compliance with national regulations, schools and universities haven’t resumed yet since when they closed in March 2020 and vulnerable students don’t have means to follow online classes. In Andhra Pradesh, India, lessons have resumed just for some grades so most of the 170 girls are still at home, but a new program for vocational training started in December in order to make entering the labor market easier for young women, involving other 50 girls. In Uganda, only candidate classes came back to school while the 24 girls in the first years of secondary school are at home waiting for their lessons to start again. In the state of Paraiba, Brazil, in the town of Sant Rita classes have not resumed yet: 12 girls that are supported through the project completed the course in human resources management and have the opportunity to follow online lessons through the computers in the library and receive food support. 2 girls in the last class of high school followed an online course to get prepared for university.

In Bangladesh, the reopening of schools keeps being postponed. For the lower levels of education, teachers ensure that children continue their education by teaching them in small groups or delivering and correcting modules. While this surely helps in keeping at least some motivation, it is not enough in order to persuade the poorest families that this is just a temporary period of crisis and their daughters’ education is worth waiting for it to be over. So, some families see their daughters’ marriage as the best solution in order to ensure livelihood for the whole family, girls included. Early marriages are secretly arranged so that teachers and social workers cannot prevent them. Arrangements for some marriages were actually discovered, ceremonies were prevented and parents sensitised again but then marriages were re-arranged in another date. Sensitisation goes on in order to strengthen parents’ belief in education but it is a long-term process. In order to strengthen it, girls in higher studies received their monthly stipend for 2020 even though their classes were suspended so that their parents had at least a little practical incentive to pursue their education. 

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Why is it so important to educate girls? First of all because it is their intrinsic right, as enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child . Secondly because girls’ education promotes sustainable development. When girls gain access to education they acquire important knowledge that gives them greater potential for employment and income-earning as adults. Even with limited schooling, the impact of education can be observed. Studies show that for each additional year of schooling, a girl in a low-income country will increase her future income even though the extent of this increase varies according to the methodology applied. According to the latest studies endorsed by UNICEF and the World Bank, each additional year of education contributes to a 18% increase in GDP per capita at national level and to a 10% increase in individual income, with higher return rates for women than for men, while increasing the secondary education of girls by 1% generate a 0.3% increase in the annual per capita growth rate of GDP. Countries with greater gender equality and fewer gender differences in primary and secondary schools are more likely to have higher economic growth. Education also improves women’s status within the family, empowers them to make their own choices and gives them more control over resources, control that increases with their level of education. The impact on sustainable development is achieved not only through an increase in GDP but also through education itself as mothers who attended school themselves make greater efforts to ensure that their own children attend school, and health thanks to family planning, the importance attributed to prenatal care, vaccines, nutrition and doctors consultations: one additional year of school reduces infant mortality rate by 5-10%. Education for girls can therefore be the starting point of an upward spiral and lead women and their families out of poverty. Finally, with adequate education, most early and combined marriages could be prevented. For girls who studied for 7 years, the age of marriage is postponed by 4 years and women who completed secondary education on average have 2.3 children fewer than women with no education. If all the girls in low and middle-income countries completed primary school, this would reduce the under-5 mortality by 15% and if all of them completed secondary school this would reduce it by 49%. Educated women are also more likely not to justify their husband’s violence and dangerous practices such as genital mutilations and can become active leaders of change in their communities. In general, the cost-to-benefit ratio for primary school is higher than for lower and upper secondary education. However, there are two exceptions, which are the reduction of the age at first birth for which it is 40% more cost-effective to invest in lower secondary than in primary education, and the increase in the use of media .

A STORY FROME THE FIELD

Sushmita  is a daughter of a poor family from Machiara village in Khalilnagar union of Tala upazila of Satkhira district. Her father  is a day laborer and mother  is a housewife. Sushmita's elder sister  got married a long time ago, her brother  is in class VI. Her father found it difficult to pay for her educational expenses after domestic expenses. Sushmita wants to be established after finishing her studies. But her dream came to a halt due to poverty of her family. At that time Sushmita decided that she would have to do something besides her studies and stand by her father's side. While she was in class VI, she took training in tailoring. At the end of the training, she purchased an old sewing machine. Now she is a mature tailor. By working on the machine she is earning some money which he spends on her study. Now she is student of class X.

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Girls at school
Girls at school

A letter from our parnter in India:

"Since colleges were running on and off due to coronavirus pandemic, regular activities did not take place in this period. When we look at case studies, these cases are similar, the socio-economic conditions miserable and the liquor consumption a horrible situation leading to tragedy and disintegrated families. The family relations are always strained and has an impact on children. Fortunately, in these cases, all the girls have developed a positive outlook towards education and hopes on bright future. Their determination is very strong and they are able to face all kinds of adverse situations. The fate of girl children, the struggles they have to face to continue their studies is remarkable. I am wonder stuck while translating how these girls are able to focus on education and come up with good performance. The women suffer when husbands are alive and continue to suffer after their death also, clearing their medical bills or debts. Running the house, of course, almost always remains their responsibility. It is really very prestigious project supporting girl children for higher education. 

 

KATE A. 

is the daughter of B. and C. and belongs to Kattakindapalli village  in Prakasam District. She is 19 years old and studying Intermediate second year in Government Junior College, Yarragonda Palem. She has taken (Bi-PC) Biology, Physics and Chemistry as subjects for her studies. She is a day-scholar and goes to college daily by auto to a distance of 5 kms from her village. She has to pay the Examination fee every year. She is good in Mathematics.

A.’s father slowly started consumption of alcohol along with other villagers and gradually it became a regular habit and then addiction. He was spending his earnings on liquor initially and after sometime, started snatching her mothers’ earnings too. Life turned out to be difficult for the family, for survival first and thereafter he used to quarrel and torture the family members. Her father met with an accident while driving drunk on a motorcycle and died on the spot. This happened when Athyusha was 10years old. She has a younger brother who is studying in the local school. Since there is no high school in the village, Athyusha joined the hostel for further studies.Her mother now has to look after the family and the debt husband left behind. She has to do more work in order to earn more income. So, she joined under a contractor to work and slowly developed illicit relationship with him. Knowing this, his parents were looking for a match for him. In this situation A.’s mother eloped with him. Athyusha was quite upset with these developments. Her brother is staying with grandmother and continuing the studies.In 2019 her grandmother died due to ill-health. Athyusha and her brother became orphans. They came back to the village and started staying in a slab house of their own which is built with the support of local Government and ASSIST. Not liking the idea of a teenager staying alone, her paternal aunt came and took away both the children to her village. There, with the help of relatives, her brother was admitted in a college. Athyusha was going for labour work along with her aunt. Meanwhile, ASSIST field staff came to know what all was happening with Athyusha and convinced her aunt and admitted her in Kasturba women’s college and provided her all the requirements. With the help of friends, she is gradually recovering from the trauma of the past. She likes to become nurse in future and help poor people who are not able to pay the fees.

A. is very much interested in studies and quite intelligent. She is always the topper in the class and especially fond of Mathematics

Dancing Girls
Dancing Girls
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

During this long emergency period, we'll go on working for the empowerment and the access to education of the girls. 

Eudcation is the key to prevent abuse, to achieve independence and to obtain a job: in a word through education girls can have the chanche of a future.

Sushmita  is a daughter of a poor family from Machiara village in Khalilnagar union of Tala upazila of Satkhira district. Her father  is a day laborer and mother Sabitri is a housewife. Sushmita's elder sister  got married a long time ago, her brother  is in class VI. Her father found it difficult to pay for her educational expenses after domestic expenses. Sushmita wants to be established after finishing her studies. But her dream came to a halt due to poverty of her family. At that time Sushmita decided that she would have to do something besides her studies and stand by her father's side. While she was in class VI, she took training in tailoring. At the end of the training, she purchased an old sewing machine. Now she is a mature tailor. By working on the machine she is earning some money which he spends on her study. Now she is student of class X.

 

Latika is the daughter of Pankaj and Kabita  of Gadaipur village in Gadaipur union of Paikgachha Upazilla of Khulna district. Latika 's father works in bamboo & cane and mother works in the household as well as bamboo & cane. Latika  studied in the 1st year of HSC at Raruli College. She is supported stipend by our higher education support program. Her sister  is in class VIII and younger brother Vim  is in class I. The number of people in their family is 07. Latika helped her father with the bamboo work in addition to her studies. Latika's wish will be established after finishing the study.

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

One of the worst risk of this terrible pandemia is that in some countries as India or Bangladesh, young girls are again pushed into  potential old husbands's arms. we must go on with a deep engagement to avoid this danger and to reduce the possibility that girls are married without any choose. 

Many parents marry their daughters young because they feel it is in her best interest, often to ensure her safety in areas where girls are at high risk of harassment and physical or sexual assault. When families face even greater hardship, they may see child marriage as a coping mechanism in the face of poverty and violence. 

Reina's parents' thoughts are no exception. Reia K., daughter of I. M. of Srim....village in Jalalpur union under Tala upazila of Satkhira district. Reina K. is a 5th class student of Jalalpur Dalit School and is 13 years old. Reina's father I. M. works as a day laborer and mother R. works as a housemaid at home. But her father could not find any work because of the lockdown. Her mother was also excluded from the work that she did. My parents discuss with my uncle about my marriage. My father said the main reason I deceided to marry her off was to reduce the costs of my family. I couldn't believe it when I heard it. I quietly agree to the marriage and marry him whom I have never seen before. I experience shyness, fear, loneliness and unhappiness, she said.

More than half of girls from the poorest families in dalit community are married as children. Where poverty is acute, family members believe that marriage will be a solution to secure their daughters future. Giving a daughter in marriage allows parents to reduce family expenses by ensuring they have one less person to feed, cloths and educate. In communities where brides family pays the groom a dowry, they often have to pay less money if the bride is young and uneducated. S. face the same case. S. is the daughter of Sh. D. of Uludanga village in Haridhali union under Paikgachha upazila of Khulna district. S. D.'s father is a day laborer and her mother  is a housewife. 15 year old S. is a 9th class student of Uludanga Dalit School. No dowry was demanded from the groom side. So her father never thought a second time because they passed a taff situation due to corona crisis. On 12/06/2020, S. married at her sister's house (in Finding village of Asashuni Upazilla). She was secretly married to D., a 22 years old and is a clerk of Satkhira court. 

 

ONLY WITH YOUR HELP WE COULD INTERRUPT THIS TRAGIC CIRCLE  and guarantee to girl to have a future and a autonomous life

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Mission Bambini

Location: Milano - Italy
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @aiutareibambini
Project Leader:
Alberto Barenghi
Milano, Italy
$472 raised of $25,000 goal
 
6 donations
$24,528 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

Mission Bambini has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.