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Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti

by Beyond Borders
Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti
Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti
Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti
Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti
Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti
Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti
Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti
Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti
Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti
Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti
Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti
Ketly & her sisters are in school, thanks to you!
Ketly & her sisters are in school, thanks to you!

Thank You for Your Generous Support

Your generous support for Beyond Borders’ Free, Educate, and Empower Girls in Haiti project on GlobalGiving is making a difference for girls like 12-year-old Ketly.*

“Our school fees are paid, the roof on our house doesn’t leak anymore, and we don’t fight anymore,” Ketly said in describing how life has changed thanks to a Beyond Borders’ initiative that is equipping moms like hers with the skills, training, and resources they need to lift their families out of extreme poverty.

Empowering moms to break the cycle of extreme poverty means that they can afford to send their daughters to school -- and girls like Ketly, who previously missed school because her mom couldn't afford school fees, now gets the chance to go to school and become a powerful force for change.

Globally, an extra year of primary school is proven to boost girls' eventual wages by 20%, and an extra year of secondary school adds 25%, making economies more fair and prosperous for all. Research shows that educated girls like Ketly become empowered women who reinvest 90% of their income in their families, paying school tuition, buying food, books, and medicine.

“Our future is going to be good because we’re in school,” Ketly said.

*We’ve changed her name to protect her privacy.

You are Building a Movement in Haiti to Empower Girls

Building the movement to empower girls requires multiple approaches, from efforts designed to end violence against girls and the exploitation of girls in schools, to initiatives that equip families with the skills and resources they need to provide for themselves and send their children to school, to trainings that organize communities to stop the flow of children in to domestic servitude and balance power between women and men.

That’s why with your generous support we are expanding work to improve access to educational opportunities for girls’ like Ketly and make schools safer; end child slavery, which disproportionately traps girls; and train and mobilize activists in communities across Haiti to prevent violence against women and girls. Thank you for making this work possible!

Highlighted Achievements Made Possible with Your Support

Your generosity made the following achievements possible from January-March 2019:

Improving Access to Educational Opportunities for Girls and Making Schools Safer - Unschooled children are among the most at-risk of being sent away to live with other families and becoming trapped in slavery. Child Protection Brigades provided financial support to 51 girls and boys in this period to ensure that they could go to school.

But ensuring access to school for unschooled children is only part of the solution.

Your gift also continues to support efforts to expand the use of our Power to Girls toolkit. Designed for use by schools and communities to prevent violence against girls, Power to Girls is increasing girls’ safety, voice, and agency by supporting schools and communities in an effort to rethink power imbalances between men and women, and girls and boys, creating new social norms around gender equality.

“Sometimes we find instances of boys harassing girls,” said Sister Marie, the principal at St. Paul Catholic School in Jacmel, which is using Power to Girls. “Now we can stop it in its tracks. We know how to talk to them.”

Marie-Carmel is a teacher at St. Paul and attended school there herself as a child. “In that time there was no equality in power between girls and boys. Boys were always valued more than girls,” she said. Today Marie-Carmel uses Power to Girls in her classroom. “I see so much change that’s happened now.”

Lydia*, a student at St. Paul’s and a member of one of 16 Girls’ Clubs launched by Beyond Borders, shared what Power to Girls has taught her. “Power to Girls taught me that I have rights, that I have power, and that I have the same rights as boys,” Lydia said. “Before I participated in Power to Girls activities I didn’t think I had any rights.”

Power to Girls also understands the importance boys play in the change process. By actively engaging boys through Power to Girls, they are learning how to balance power with girls and treat them with respect. In school, boys are learning that when girls live free from violence boys benefit too!

*We’ve changed her name to protect her privacy.

Preventing Violence Against Women and Girls - Thanks to your support, seven communities on Lagonav Island continue to work through the SASA! community mobilization programming to prevent violence against women and girls. This quarter, the communities of Nan Kafe and Matènwa entered the Action Phase, the 4th and last phase of SASA!. Masikren, Fonnèg, Chenkontan, Gransous and Bouziyèt moved into the Support Phase (the 3rd phase of SASA!).

Specific achievements include: Support Phase training held with 210 Community Activists and network leaders in Masikren, Fonnèg, Chenkontan, Gransous and Bouziyèt; Action Phase training held with 33 Community Activists in Nan Kafe and Matènwa; quarterly meetings held with participation of 86 Community Activists; and, field visits conducted to observe and support 114 Community Activists as they conducted SASA! activities with community members to advance violence against women and girls prevention efforts.

Ending Child Slavery, Which Disproportionately Traps Girls - With your support, the community mobilization and intervention work of Child Protection Brigades and Adult Survivors of Child Slavery groups continued throughout Haiti. As a result, 26 girls and boys were freed from slavery and situations of abuse and reunited with their families.

In this three month period, more than 1,500 women and men began receiving training on the dangers of sending children away to live with others -- the primary way that children in Haiti become enslaved -- different forms of child abuse, child rights, and how to take action to ensure that the rights of children are respected, including in situations of violence against children.

Additionally over the last three months, 13 workshops were conducted with Child Protection Brigades and Adult Survivor groups to test an assessment tool designed to make these groups more effective in their work to protect children from slavery and abuse and change the way that adults think about the rights of children.

Thank You Again

Your support makes the work to free, educate, and empower girls in Haiti possible. We are grateful for your generosity, your care, and your concern. If you have any questions about what you read in this report, please feel free to contact Brian Stevens, Beyond Borders Donor Engagement Director, at b.stevens@beyondborders.net or at (305) 450-2561.

Sr. Marie
Sr. Marie's school uses the Power to Girls toolkit
Lydia using Power to Girls in her classroom.
Lydia using Power to Girls in her classroom.
Meeting with adult survivors of child slavery.
Meeting with adult survivors of child slavery.
SASA! Action Phase materials to prevent VAWG.
SASA! Action Phase materials to prevent VAWG.
Give with confidence.
Give with confidence.

Links:

Loudamise is in school, thanks to your generosity.
Loudamise is in school, thanks to your generosity.

We Are Grateful for Your Generous Support

We are so grateful for your generous support for Beyond Borders’ Free, Educate, & Empower Girls in Haiti project. Thanks to you, the work to train and mobilize activists in communities across Haiti to build the movement to prevent violence against women and girls; improve girls' access to educational opportunities and make schools safer; and end child slavery, which disproportionately traps girls, continues to expand.

You Make School Possible for More Girls Like Loudamise

Loudamise is a sixth-grader on Lagonav Island. At 16, Loudamise is five years older than most girls and boys in the sixth grade. She almost never got the chance to go to school at all. But thanks to your support, her school is one of 25 in Beyond Borders’ Schools Not Slavery Network where teachers are trained in a government-approved curriculum called Accelerated Education that helps students who start school late - because they were enslaved or because their parents couldn’t afford to send them to school -  to make up the grades they missed and complete their education. “My favorite subject is French, and I want to be an agronomist when I grow up,” Loudamise told us. Thank you for making an education for her and many more girls like her possible!

You Make Critically Needed Work to Prevent Violence Against Girls & Women Possible

Your support is also making critically needed violence prevention work possible in Haiti, where girls and women face high levels of violence and discrimination. One in three Haitian women has experienced some form of violence in their lifetime, and one in three girls has already experienced violence by age 18. One in five girls in Haiti reported their first sexual experience was forced. These experiences have acute and long-term consequences for survivors, as global research shows that violence against women and girls affects the mental and physical health of survivors, including an increased risk of injuries, death, unwanted pregnancy, contracting sexually transmitted diseases, mental health problems, and maternal health problems. Overall acceptance of violence against women as normal is also common, with 80% of Haitian men reporting that they think violence against women and girls is justifiable in some situations. But your support is making the work to change all this possible.

More Than 67,000 Women and Men Reached by Community Activists Since 2010

With support from you and people like you, since 2010, more than 1000 community activists and civic and religious leaders from 20 communities have engaged neighbors in a multi-year community mobilization process to balance power between women and men, prevent violence against women and girls, and ensure equality of opportunity for girls and women. This programming has reached more than 67,000 people with dialogue and messages to transform the ways that families and communities share power between women and men, and the way that they think about and address violence against women and girls.

Building a Grassroots-Led Movement to Create Lasting, Sustainable Change

The programming that your support makes possible is designed to be led primarily by grassroots community activists trained by Beyond Borders who work completely as volunteers. By using participatory approaches that build community capacity and shift social norms, Beyond Borders engages the community itself in taking responsibility for transforming attitudes and building local movements. Communities continue to organize themselves to defend the rights of children, prevent and reduce violence against women and girls, and teach others to do the same without continued dependence on Beyond Borders.

For example, community activists and network members trained in the four-phases of the SASA! methodology that Beyond Borders uses to prevent violence against women and girls (Start, Awareness, Support, Action) seek to influence others in the course of their day-to-day lives, to teach others how to balance power between women and men, and prevent violence against women and girls. So, pastors are preaching sermons that encourage balanced power and nonviolence; teachers are transforming how they use their power in the classroom to create balanced spaces for girls as learners; health workers are changing how they serve survivors of violence; and couples are sharing how they’ve transformed the balance of power between women and men and girls and boys in their own homes.

By training and accompanying these volunteer community activists to use tools in the SASA! methodology to engage a community process, Beyond Borders is employing an ecological model to ensure engagement from people in all walks of life and from all different circles of influence. Your support makes this strategy of infiltration possible!

Your Support Makes ‘Power to Girls’, an Innovative, School-Based Violence Prevention Effort, Possible

Your support is making innovative school-based initiatives to prevent gender-based violence and balance power between women and men and girls and boys possible in Haiti. The goal of these initiatives is to increase access to school for girls and achieve a measurable reduction in violence against girls through increased knowledge and skills and changes in attitudes and behavior among teachers, school directors, and students themselves.

Power to Girls includes a school-wide process of change, recognizing schools as an institution with power over girls’ current lives and with the power to shape future social norms in a community.

The school-wide process of change includes:

  • policy shifts such as a school Code of Conduct signed by all school personnel;
  • training of and meetings with school personnel, including identification and capacity building of focal points to conduct school-based prevention activities
  • integration of the Power to Girls school curriculum in lesson plans by social science, biology and language teachers.

Highlighted Achievements From the Third Quarter of FY19

Ending Child Slavery, Which Disproportionately Traps Girls - During the quarter, Beyond Borders’ Lagonav Island Child Rights team continued mobilizing 16 communities to protect children, including working with local Child Protection Brigades and local chapters of the Adult Survivors of Child Slavery Network. 27 children (17 girls, 10 boys) were rescued from child slavery situations in these partner communities.

The National Day to End the Practice of Restavèk (Child Slavery) was observed on November 17, 2018. This important day was marked and celebrated in multiple communities with joint activities organized by Child Protection Brigades and branches of the Adult Survivor Network. More than 4,200 people participated in awareness-raising activities.

On the occasion of national day, in the Lagonav Island community of Nan Sema, Child Rights Activists conducted household visits to raise awareness about the dangers of the child slavery and to promote prevention of violence against children. They closed a week’s worth of events with a town hall meeting to invite community members to share their ideas on the situation of children and how they can become more involved in promoting children’s rights.

During the quarter, BB continued technical support programming and a funding partnership with other organizations to implement child rights mobilization in their communities. This included:

  • Refresher training held with 14 Child Rights Training facilitators,
  • Training on roles and responsibilities held with 235 individuals (195 women), including members of the Adult Survivor of Child Slavery Network and local Child Protection Brigades,
  • Four days of awareness-raising visits were conducted with 671 adults (547 women) to strengthen the Adult Survivor Network,
  • BB also continued supporting other organizations with technical and financial support to implement child rights mobilization strategies in three communal sections in Haiti’s North Department. Altogether, 3,260 residents attended training sessions and community gatherings to build the movement to end child slavery in their region. Twenty adult survivors joined the local chapter of the network.

Preventing Violence Against Women and Girls - Thanks to you, seven communities on Lagonav Island continue to work through the four-phase SASA! program to prevent violence against women and girls and balance power between women and men and girls and boys.

The communities of Nan Kafe and Matènwa have completed the assessment of Phase 3 – Support, and the results are being analyzed. The results will indicate if the communities are ready to move into the 4th and final phase – Action Phase.  The communities of Masikren, Fonnèg, Chenkontan, Gransous and Bouziyèt have completed the assessment of Phase 2 – Awareness. Positive results will mean these communities move into the Support Phase (Phase 3).

Additional achievements that your support made possible this quarter include:

  • Rapid assessments held to gauge community readiness to move to the next stage of SASA! (as described above);
  • Field visits conducted to observe and support 114 community activists as they conducted SASA! activities with community members to advance the prevention of violence against women and girls;
  • Quarterly meetings held with 114 community activists and 320 SASA! network leaders to monitor progress;
  • Training workshop on media and advocacy delivered to 70 network leaders (35 women);
  • Household visits conducted in Nan Kafe to promote concepts to prevent violence against women and girls among residents, engaging 216 people (119 women) in dialogue.

Completion of Joint Research Initiative – Beyond Borders completed a three-year collaborative research project with the University of California San Diego (UCSD), Center for Gender Equity and Health, and Raising Voices.  The project aimed to research various adaptations of the SASA! methodology (including BB’s adaptation for Haiti) as well as the effectiveness of BB’s Technical Support program as a hub for providing technical assistance to implementing organizations. The results of the research were publicly presented in Haiti in January 2019 with the aim to foster greater visibility of and support for the SASA! methodology to prevent violence against women and girls and balance power between women and men and girls and boys. BB also used the occasion to present the Power to Girls methodology to those in attendance. The published report in English will be made available after 19 February 2019.

Establishing a Relationship with the Ministry of Women’s Affairs at the National Level – BB continued to advance efforts to establish a working relationship with the Ministry of Women’s Affairs. This is slow going, as repeated attempts to hold a follow-up meeting with the new Minister have failed. Some additional work behind the scenes with connections within the Ministry did allow for a phone call with the Deputy Executive Director and the Minister, who agreed to set up a meeting. Unfortunately, despite confirmation of date and time of meeting, the Minister did not show for the meeting. We have continued attempts to schedule, and have hope that this meeting will occur eventually. A working protocol for collaboration could lead to many positive outcomes!

Thank You

With your continued support, our team will continue these kinds of innovative initiatives in 2019, to reach more communities, more schools, and more grassroots leaders. Your support makes the work to free, educate, and empower girls in Haiti possible. We are grateful for your generosity, your care, and your concern. If you have any questions about what you read in this report, please feel free to contact Brian Stevens, Beyond Borders Donor Engagement Director, at b.stevens@beyondborders.net.

SASA! wants to empower all to prevent violence.
SASA! wants to empower all to prevent violence.
Community activists working to prevent violence.
Community activists working to prevent violence.
Increasing girls
Increasing girls' access to education @ 25 schools
Global Giving once again named BB a staff favorite
Global Giving once again named BB a staff favorite
The SASA! toolkit to prevent VAWG
The SASA! toolkit to prevent VAWG

Links:

Organizing to end violence against women & girls.
Organizing to end violence against women & girls.

Thank You for Your Generous Support!

Thank you so much for your kind, thoughtful, and generous gift to support Beyond Borders’ Free, Educate, & Empower Girls in Haiti project on GlobalGiving.

Your gift is expanding work with grassroots leaders, leveraging their power to:

  • end child slavery, which disproportionately traps girls;
  • improve girls' access to educational opportunities and make schools safer;
  • expand efforts proven to prevent violence against girls and women and mobilize everyone in a community to balance power between women, men, and girls and boys.

534 Preventing Violence Against Women & Girls Activists Trained, 123 Child Rights Activists Trained, 16 Child Protection Brigades Trained

Your gift made it possible to train 534 women and men in the period from July-September 2018 to engage fellow community members where they live in conversations to promote balanced power and prevent violence against women and girls. Your support also helped to train 123 Child Rights Activists and 16 Child Protection Brigades (made up of 12-15 members each) to protect girls and boys from slavery, abuse, and neglect.

What Activists in Haiti are Saying About the Impact of Your Support

An activist from the community of Nan Kafe trained to prevent violence against women and girls told us: "It used to be that a man could hit his wife in my community and no one tried to stop it or even thought it was wrong. Not anymore. Today it's not acceptable and any man who tries will hear from others about it."

A fellow activist said: "Women and men are sharing in the decision-making in their households now and parents are listening to the voices of their girls equally with their boys. Men don't keep money from women like they did before. People are learning that balancing power in a family makes that family stronger and leads to better choices."

Another activist asked us to share this message with you: "We know we couldn't do this work without their support, and we hope that with more support we can reach more people in more communities with our message of equality. Thank you!"

Here’s What Your Support Made Possible This Quarter

From July through September 2018, here’s what your support made possible in Haiti:

End Child Slavery, Which Disproportionately Traps Girls

During the quarter, on Lagonav Island, your support made it possible for BB’s Child Rights team to continue mobilizing 16 communities to protect children, including working with Child Protection Brigades (CPB) and Survivors of Restavèk Network (SRN) groups. One of the strategic objectives of this effort is to grow the SRN, to further define the role of the Network and its members.

A development plan for the Network, based on collective action theory, includes three dimensions: awareness, organization, mobilization. The plan describes steps and activities over three years to get survivors organized and the network strengthened. The rural Network is currently composed of 698 members with groups in 16 BB partner communities on Lagonav Island, in 14 communities in and around Port-au-Prince, and in the North Department, where BB’s partner organization PDL is mobilizing new Survivors of Restavèk Network (SRN) groups in 44 intervention communities.

Thanks to the training that your support makes possible, Child Protection Brigades are demonstrating initiative to act on behalf of children’s rights in Lagonav communities. In Fonnèg and Tipalmis, CPBs intervened on behalf of three children who were victims of sexual assault by adult male perpetrators. CPBs supported parents as they helped their children access response services and navigated the judicial process.

In Chenkontan and Nan Kafe, CPBs paid school tuition for four children (two girls). Additionally, community members have begun to see the need to be more involved in community development and the movement to end child slavery. For example, Nan Kafe and Chenkontan have a lot of people that have shared their resources to support children to go to school. In Nan Kafe, there are ten people who have promised to contribute to send children to school. In fact, 9,000 Haitian Gourdes (HTG) was raised in Chenkontan, and 13,000 HTG in Nan Kafe. These funds are available to help pay school and purchase school supplies for more children. This is a direct result of engaging community members in their own community’s development.

Additional Outputs

  • Five children at risk (four girls) were identified by CPBs with support from BB
  • 16 CPBs were supported to identify children at risk (five children, four girls); to raise funds in their communities to help vulnerable children; and, to identify and encourage local residents who have the habit of helping children
  • 18 SRN members in Nan Kafe (16 women) and 36 SRN members in Nan Mango (31 women) attended a day-long meeting to raise awareness
  • 15 BB staff (four women) received a three-day training on foster care system to build BB staff capacity to begin identifying potential families to foster children coming out of slavery situations in Lagonav communities
  • 90 child rights activists (59 women) participated in four meetings – one in each of four communal sections – to facilitate the creation of child rights advocacy units in each section

Improve Girls' Access to Educational Opportunities and Make Schools Safer

Your gift is supporting efforts to increase access to school for girls and achieve a measurable reduction in violence against girls through increased knowledge and skills and change in attitudes and behavior among teachers, school directors, and students themselves.

In Kay Jakmèl, local activists trained by BB’s Rethinking Power program to prevent violence against women and girls (VAWG) continued their advocacy campaign toward the mandatory integration of curriculum on preventing VAWG in local schools. They engaged the school leadership of several schools toward this end, arguing for the integration and the school leadership’s support of their advocacy with the local Ministry of Education. BB’s Rethinking Power Coordinator meet with that committee four times during the period to provide input into their advocacy strategy; she also offered advocacy training to the committee and several collaborating women’s organizations and schools in the Kay Jakmèl area who are joining the committee. The training included 13 people total (4 women, 9 men) and included leadership representatives from 10 schools in the area. The team continues to communicate with the committee and listen to its needs as it advances toward its goals.

In addition, the school in Kap Wouj that piloted Power to Girls, in a community that originally implemented SASA!*, continues to live its beliefs in several ways. It re-signed the code of conduct written by school focal points during the pilot of Power to Girls, which prohibits exploitation of girls in school and intends to sign again with personnel and publicize with parents and students this September. They are currently discussing with the team how to continue to integrate Power to Girls school curriculum and activities into their coursework as part of the normal functioning of the school.

Two sets of three-day training were held in each of two partner secondary schools implementing Power to Girls, for a total of six days training for all (124) school personnel. This includes everyone from the school custodians to teachers to school directors, as they all contribute to the environment and social norms of the school. The first set of three-day training included selection of School Focal Points, who then drafted codes of conduct and established referral systems in the school for adoption in the second set of trainings. It included Phase 2 (Awareness) topics and topics unique to schools and teachers’ roles as shapers of social norms.

During the quarter, BB’s primary partner organization on Lagonav Island, the Matènwa Community Learning Center (MCLC), launched programming with five newly integrated network schools, introducing these schools for the first time to nonviolent classroom management, participative teaching methods, and Haitian Creole as a language of instruction. This approach also emphasizes equality between girls and boys in the classroom. MCLC also continued its work with 20 schools from the existing network, continuing to promote application of these nonviolent, inclusive practices rooted in equality.

Regular training and mentoring of the 16 Girls’ Group Mentors was a major focus throughout the reporting period. They learned about Power to Girls and practiced explaining it to parents and the community, as well as to girls themselves. Additional practice sessions were organized to further support skill building. More training opportunities on their group leadership skills and facilitation of materials and topics within Power to Girls were conducted. An additional 3-day training was offered covering topics like leadership, being a mentor, power, violence against women, and games to play to interest girls. Regular meetings with mentors and visits to groups also formed opportunities for additional skills practice and engagement with topics in Power to Girls.

16 girls’ groups (eight for girls 10-14 years old and eight for girls 15-19 years old) met regularly (weekly with a few exceptions due to rain, etc.). Mentors held community meetings to explain the girls’ groups to 162 women and 103 men in total; this included parents and caregivers, community leaders and youth. The idea of the groups was warmly received in general which significantly garnered much needed support for the groups. As girls’ groups began to meet regularly, ideas for learning and recreational materials were forwarded to staff, who purchased dominos, jump ropes, balloons and other games, as well as chalk, notebooks and other learning materials for the groups to use.

The team held the first girls’ group feedback meetings––one each in Mizak and Tenyè. The method is designed as an opportunity for girls’ groups to give feedback to the rest of the community Network on how they see Power to Girls, and the activism non-girls are doing toward promoting girls’ power. It is designed as a means to encourage accountability of non-girls to girls, as ultimately any perceived ‘progress’ toward Power to Girls indicators should be defined and validated by girls themselves.

*SASA! Is the four-phase methodology created by our friends at Raising Voices and adapted culturally and linguistically by Beyond Borders for use in Haiti.

Additional Outputs

  • 31 teachers and principals from five new network schools received pedagogical training in nonviolent, participatory approaches that emphasize equality between girls and boys during a four-day workshop hosted by MCLC
  • Continued work with 20 schools from the existing network, to promote application of nonviolent, inclusive practices rooted in equality.
  • 8 communities are being evaluated on their progress in Phase 2 of Power to Girls - BB’s step-by-step guide to preventing violence against girls and balancing power between girls and boys in schools and communities - to determine if they can move on to Phase 3
  • BB conducted internal capacity development training for staff on Phase 3 of Power to Girls, in advance of the move from Phase 2 to Phase 3 for the 8 above mentioned communities.

Expand Efforts Proven to Prevent Violence Against Girls and Women, and; Mobilize Everyone to Balance Power Between Women, Men, and Girls and Boys

Your gift is also supporting Beyond Borders’ work to expand the movement to prevent violence against women and girls (VAWG) and balance power between women and men in Haiti.

Lagonav communities are advancing through the four progressive phases of SASA!. Two communities continue in the Support Phase and five communities are preparing to move into the Support Phase.

During the quarter, a total of 534 activists received technical support from BB to use SASA! tools to engage community members in conversations to promote balanced power and to prevent VAWG.

Five communities – Bouziyèt, Masikren, Fonnèg, Chenkontan, and Gransous – continued in the Awareness Phase, engaging a total of 420 SASA! activists (215 women). BB is now preparing to conduct rapid assessments to gauge these five communities’ readiness to enter the Support phase. In two communities – Nan Kafe and Matènwa – BB continues to support 114 community activists and network members to conduct VAWG prevention activities. BB completed rapid assessments in these communities during the quarter and awaits results to ensure community readiness to enter into the Action Phase.

With funding from UN Trust Fund, BB is partnering with two partner Haitian organizations that are led by, and represent and serve people living with disabilities. The aim of the partnership is to implement a 3-year project that focuses on girls and women with disabilities of all ages. In addition to the two partner organizations, members of the SASA! community network founded by BB and the general public in Lavale, in Haiti’s Southeastern Department, which mostly comprises rural villages, will take part. The UN Trust Fund supported project includes carrying out research into the experiences of girls and women with disabilities; creating context-specific materials in Creole for use in interventions using SASA!/Power to Girls methodologies; carrying out community mobilization using SASA!/Power to Girls; advocating for the implementation of relevant laws and policies; providing capacity building and technical support to project partners and increasing their knowledge management capabilities.

Additional Outputs

  • 318 community activists and network members/leaders (183 women) convened to facilitate exchange and learning, address challenges, and look at impact generated by activities
  • Referral system lists were revised and distributed to ensure appropriate response services for domestic violence survivors
  • 70 community activists gathered at three monthly workshops to strengthen capacity to facilitate community dialogue using SASA! materials, and to plan activities for the coming month
  • 150 residents of 60 households in Nan Kafe were engaged in conversations about power imbalance and VAWG, facilitated by activists during door-to-door visits
  • 44 community activists (22 women) in Nan Kafe and Matènwa attended three meetings for exchange and learning, to strengthen mobilization skills, to address challenges, and to plan the next period’s activities
  • 114 community activists and network members combined (57 women) participated in a meeting to provide feedback on the SASA! methodology, to look at program impact, and to address challenges faced by activists.

Thank You Again

Your support makes the work to free, educate, and empower girls in Haiti possible. We are grateful for your generosity, your care, and your concern. If you have any questions about what you read in this report, please feel free to contact Brian Stevens, Beyond Borders Donor Engagement Director, at b.stevens@beyondborders.net.

Ensuring girls have equal access to good schools.
Ensuring girls have equal access to good schools.
Members of the Masikren Child Protection Brigade.
Members of the Masikren Child Protection Brigade.
Training teachers in nonviolent classroom mgmt.
Training teachers in nonviolent classroom mgmt.
Survivors of child slavery organizing to end it.
Survivors of child slavery organizing to end it.

Links:

A Girls
A Girls' Club gathering in southeastern Haiti.

We Are Grateful for Your Generous Support

Your generous gift to Beyond Borders’ Free, Educate, & Empower Girls in Haiti project on GlobalGiving supports work with grassroots leaders to end child slavery, which disproportionately traps girls; improve girls' access to educational opportunities and make schools safer; expand efforts proven to prevent violence against girls and women, and; mobilize everyone to balance power between women, men, and girls and boys.

What Girls in Haiti Are Saying About the Impact of Your Support

The difference you are making in the lives of girls can best be described by girls themselves. Here are two personal testimonies on the impact of your support:

In Tikoma, one of the 16 communities on Lagonav Island where we are working, a girl who is a survivor of child slavery, told us, “If this program had been here earlier, we wouldn’t have suffered the way we did living in slavery. We hope this program touches many places in the country, so that other children who are suffering in household slavery can find their freedom.”

And in Lavale, a community in southeastern Haiti where our Power to Girls and Girls’ Club programming is active, a girl participating in the program told us, "I want to share how my life has changed since participating in Power to Girls. I didn't have the same power boys have. Now, my mother and father listen to me when I talk in the house, and they try to share chores between my brother and I. They give me more respect in my house and in my community. Before this, I couldn't speak up."

3,077 Women and Girls Impacted by Your Support

During the fiscal year just ended, on Lagonav Island, Beyond Borders’ movement-building programming impacted the lives of 4,974 individuals, including 3,077 women and girls, and 1,954 children and youth.

From April through June 2018, here’s the work that your generous support made possible in Haiti:

End Child Slavery, Which Disproportionately Traps Girls

This quarter, with your support, Beyond Borders’ work to end child slavery and advance the rights of children included these initiatives:

Lagonav Island

  • Seven (7) Lagonav communities achieved the goal of ensuring no child from the community was sent away by their family to live and work with a family in the city and risk becoming enslaved;
  • 30 children were retrieved from slavery by parents in participating communities;
  • The adult survivors of child slavery network continued to gain visibility,  build capacity, and recruit new members, now with 220 members (191 women);
  • 39 dialogue groups in seven Lagonav Island communities completed training using the 22-session Education is a Conversation Child Rights curriculum;
  • 619 new Child Rights Activists graduated in ceremonies across Lagonav Island;
  • 61 Child Protection Brigade delegates (15 women) from across 16 communities convened for exchange and learning and to cultivate organizing and movement building, examining how local governments can work to support communities’ maturity/capacity to resist slavery;
  • 14 communities received support to hold community events to commemorate Haiti’s National Day of the Child and World Day Against Child Labor. All 14 communities conducted activities to celebrate children and promote child rights, reaching 1,954 children and youth (1,057 girls) and their families.

Central Plateau

  • Trained and evaluated 20 Education is a Conversation Child Rights dialogue groups to build their knowledge and capacity to defend children’s rights, to understand and promote attitudes and behaviors that protect children, and to engage in interventions to protect children;
  • More than 200 Child Rights Activists trained using the Education is a Conversation Child Rights curriculum;
  • 178 Child Rights Activists (99 women) in the Central Plateau graduated;
  • Held a day-long town hall style meeting to convene 203 community residents (127 women) to exchange ideas and to spark local initiative to protect children from slavery and abuse;
  • Hosted a three-day conference with 70 adult survivors of child slavery (45 women) to invite engagement and create survivors network chapters in Savanèt in the Central Department, as participants explored various themes during the workshop, including the negative impacts of experiencing childhood slavery and how adult survivors can engage in their communities to reduce the number of children who are living in household slavery;
  • Conducted a four-day training workshop with 58 Child Protection Brigade members on Haiti’s anti-trafficking law.

West Department

  • 490 new Child Rights Activists (289 women) graduated from the 22-session Education is a Conversation Child Rights dialogue group;
  • Completed social mapping exercises with the community of Malik, to prepare them for a new partnership to protect child rights;
  • Hosted a two-day workshop on Haiti’s anti-trafficking law for 23 Child Protection Brigade members (21 women) and 22 members of the adult survivors of child slavery network (18 women);
  • Supported five adult survivors chapters (150 members, 115 of which were women) as they organized and held awareness raising activities in their communities;
  • Conducted a two-day training workshop with 21 Child Protection Brigade members (20 women) and 20 members (16 women) of the regional adult survivors network coordination committee to build advocacy skills.

Improve Girls' Access to Educational Opportunities and Make Schools Safer

Your gift is supporting our efforts to increase access to school for girls and achieve a measurable reduction in violence against girls through increased knowledge and skills and change in attitudes and behavior among teachers, school directors, and students themselves.

To realize this, your support is being used in the following ways:

  • 9 organizations have participated in Phase 1 (of 4) training for Power to Girls - a step-by-step guide to preventing violence against girls and balancing power between girls and boys in schools and communities, with one organization already advancing to Phase 3 as a long-term partner, which includes a package of ongoing capacity building;
  • 8 communities are nearing the end of Phase 2 of Power to Girls, engaging teachers and school directors in the process of implementing the violence prevention curriculum in their school;
  • Building the capacity of members of the volunteer community advocacy committee in Kay Jakmèl, in Haiti’s southeast, as the group continues to work to convince the Ministry of Education to integrate a mandatory course on preventing violence against women and girls in local schools.
  • Continue support for 16 Girls' Clubs in southeastern Haiti, in which girls learn how to advocate for themselves, are educated about reproductive health, learn that girls are equally intelligent and capable as boys, learn to express their opinions and make their voices heard, participate in community activities, and learn to identify community and school resources for reporting sexual abuse if they experience it or observe it.

Expand Efforts Proven to Prevent Violence Against Girls and Women, and; Mobilize Everyone to Balance Power Between Women, Men, and Girls and Boys

Your gift is also supporting Beyond Borders’ work to expand the movement to prevent violence against women and girls (VAWG) and balance power between women and men in Haiti.

To realize this, your support is being used in the following ways:

  • At the national level, Ministry of Women's Affairs representatives have participated in two trainings on our preventing VAWG methodologies and the development of a protocol of collaboration is underway;
  • Data collection was completed to assess best practices in the adaptation of our preventing VAWG work, and additional research components were added to evaluate our technical support work, with the goal of ensuring the most effective dissemination of preventing VAWG techniques.

Lagonav Island

  • Seven Lagonav communities advanced through the progressive phases of SASA! - the methodology we use to prevent VAWG - with two communities moving into the Support Phase and five into the Awareness Phase this year;
  • 320 community activists (154 women) convened to facilitate exchange and learning and to celebrate and support their work to prevent VAWG and build the movement in their communities;
  • 639 residents (380 women) reached with Quick Chat activities to promote VAWG prevention and balance of power between women and men;
  • Supported community activists to influence positive changes in attitudes, knowledge, capacity, and behavior of 345 people (146 women) using special, health-themed Quick Chats;
  • 225 residents (126 women) used Power Posters to talk about influencing social norms changes to prevent VAWG;
  • 77 different stakeholders (37 women), including community activists, religious and community leaders, government officials, police, and health workers, etc., supported to create referral lists for use by communities when VAWG response services are needed.

West Department

  • Mobilized 4,396 residents (2,951 women) in five West Department communities to prevent VAWG, accompanying communities through the Awareness Phase of SASA!, the second of four social norms phases that communities go through to achieve lasting change in beliefs, knowledge, capacity and behaviors;
  • Monthly meetings held with six local activism staff, with 26 community activists, and 13 members of the SASA! community network, including religious leaders, community leaders and other sectors;
  • 830 community members (530 women) participated in facilitated discussions using comic strips to illustrate themes;
  • Supported SASA! Activists as they held three popular theater performances and facilitated discussion with 408 community residents (256 youth and 152 elderly);
  • 3 community gatherings facilitated to advance themes and encourage action with 408 residents (256 youth and 152 elderly);
  • Soap Opera Listening Sessions held with 788 residents (460 youth and 328 elderly);
  • 812 persons (459 youth and 353 elderly) reached through dialogue sessions using posters to talk about the use of power;
  • Conducted 15 observation visits with network members as they facilitated SASA! Activities.

Looking Beyond

As the work that your support makes possible goes forward, lessons learned in each program will help to refine our programming (e.g. improving poster campaigns, refining advocacy training) while core strategies continue to be applied to advance the process of change.

Beyond Borders’ movement building work will continue to engage with partners and local leaders to learn how to better collaborate with government authorities and local, national, and international institutions. For example, on Lagonav Island we have been working with representatives of the various government ministries, especially the ministry of education, the ministry of agriculture, and local justices of the peace. We are learning along with local authorities and the local population healthy and productive ways of engaging local governments to play a more active role in protecting their children.

Technical support work with other organizations also ensures sustainability beyond our own structure. Our work promotes sustainability through its complementary emphasis on community mobilization and capacity building of local organizations.

All of our methodologies are structured around social norms change and community mobilization processes that continue well beyond the implementation period. By cultivating a corps of community-based activists who are passionate about the issues of preventing VAWG and defending the rights of children, we are building the movement to free, educate, and empower girls in Haiti through ongoing advocacy for policy change and continued community actions that will be sustained locally once our work is completed.

Thank You Again

Your support makes all of this work possible. We are grateful for your generosity, your care, and your concern. If you have any questions about what you read in this report, please feel free to call us anytime at (202) 686-2088.

Girls
Girls' Clubs teach self-respect and empowerment.
A community crusade to prevent child slavery.
A community crusade to prevent child slavery.
Meeting with preventing VAWG activists on Lagonav.
Meeting with preventing VAWG activists on Lagonav.
Ensuring girls get to go to school & be safe too.
Ensuring girls get to go to school & be safe too.
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Stephanie (L) and Claire are girls
Stephanie (L) and Claire are girls' club members.

Thank You for Your Generous Support

Thank you for your generous support for Beyond Borders’ Free, Educate, & Empower Girls in Haiti project on GlobalGiving. We are grateful for your gift!

Your gift is supporting work with communities to end child slavery, which disproportionately traps girls; improve girls' access to educational opportunities and make schools safer; expand efforts proven to prevent violence against girls and women, and; mobilize everyone to balance power between women, men, and girls and boys.

Your support is making a real difference in the lives of girls like Stephanie and her friend Claire, who are members of one of 16 girls' clubs launched by Beyond Borders.

Girls' clubs provide safe, girl-only spaces where girls like Stephanie and Claire can gather to build self-confidence, develop friendships, and receive mentorship. "Before I joined the girls' club, I didn't know that girls and boys had the same rights and that girls can do anything that boys can," Stephanie said.

Girls' clubs are just one part of the work that your support is making possible. Here’s a complete look at the work to free, educate, and empower girls in Haiti that you’ve helped make possible with your generous support from January through March of 2018:

End Child Slavery, Which Disproportionately Traps Girls

With your support, this quarter, Beyond Borders continued our work with 16 communities to end child slavery and advance the rights of children. Achievements include:

1. Held Open Space gatherings with 560 residents (407 women) across six communities to engage participants in conversation around the theme, “What are participants in Beyond Borders’ Child Rights Training doing in our community to combat the practice of child slavery (restavèk, in Haitian Creole) and other violence against children?

Participants agreed to the following collective actions to contribute to the reduction of violence against children and children being sent into restavèk:

  • They agreed to organize into neighborhood associations;
  • They agreed to create economic cooperatives like Village Savings and Loan Associations and Mutual Solidarity groups to help struggling families keep their children at home;
  • They will hold campaigns to raise awareness about child rights;
  • They will hold training workshops for children and youth on how to protect themselves from violence and how to avoid pregnancy before they’re ready.

2. Held a four-day training workshop with 51 Child Protection Brigade members (19 women), using an adapted curriculum developed by ECPAT - End Child Prostitution and Trafficking, a global network of civil society organizations that works to end the sexual exploitation of children.

The workshop increased participants knowledge and awareness of sexual exploitation and abuse of children, including child sex trafficking and child pornography.

3. Integrated 80 new members into Beyond Borders’ network of Adult Survivors of Child Slavery and held meetings with 97 adult survivors (74 women) across five communities, to advance the survivors’ network.

4. Held trainings for 18 Child Protection Brigade members on advocacy techniques and facilitated 26 meetings with 234 members (78 women) of 13 Child Protection Brigades, discussing a number of issues including:

  • Writing and establishing principles and rules of engagement for regional groups of Child Protection Brigades, to streamline coordination of structures working to protect children;
  • How to combine resources to develop economic activities to help the very poorest families in a community keep their children;
  • Best practices in protecting children who are victims of violence in their communities.

5. Held a training for 55 Child Protection Brigade members on Haiti’s anti-trafficking law.

6. Held a workshop with 13 local elected officials (two women) from four communal sections to continue building relationships with local government toward increased collaboration and coordination of child protection services on the island.

Improve Girls' Access to Educational Opportunities and Make Schools Safer

Your gift is supporting the implementation of Beyond Borders’ Power to Girls, a step-by-step guide to preventing violence against girls. Power to Girls is changing power imbalances between girls and boys in schools through a school-wide process that includes personnel training, establishment of school codes of conduct and referral systems, activities outside of class time for students and personnel, and a related secondary school curriculum that integrates with classroom objectives.

1. Select and train girls’ group mentors and establish girls' groups. Sixteen girls' group mentors were contracted, received a 6-day training workshop, and were accompanied as they recruited participants and launched activities with 16 girls' groups. The Population Council's Girl Roster Tool® was adapted to determine categories of girls to recruit for the groups. Clubs are meeting actively, using Power to Girls materials, and are ready for Phase 2. Mentors participate in monthly meetings to share experiences and learn new content. Staff members support the mentors by making regular visits to group activities to support their facilitation of the groups. A consultant is supporting mentors further in keeping girls' group content interesting and in actively soliciting feedback on direction of the groups and Power to Girls from the girls themselves.

2. Select and prepare schools. The team selected three secondary schools that met the criteria outlined in Power to Girls and demonstrated active interest in participation in the methodology. The selection process included site visits and meetings with leadership and all staff. In addition, all school personnel of the schools that participated in three days of training have selected focal points, or in-school activists for change. Focal points have begun to create a school referral system and to draft codes of conduct that prohibit sexual exploitation of students, to be signed by all school personnel during a second set of trainings.

3. A school director gave this testimony about how Power to Girls has changed how he understands and acts on questions of violence and discrimination against girls: “When violence is a problem at school, I didn’t used to do anything about it. There was a student who became pregnant by another student. He claimed that the pregnancy was the girl’s fault – not his, and he didn’t do anything to accompany the girl. Now, since receiving our first Power to Girls training, I’ve come to see violence against women and girls in a new light. I feel now that this problem concerns me, and I have a duty to do something about it. I’ve come to understand women and men have the same power, and that power should be balanced. I’ve given myself the mission to practice in my free time and use the Power to Girls materials with the classes. I’m committed to work to prevent violence against girls and against women in my school, and in all other spaces.

Expand Efforts Proven to Prevent Violence Against Girls and Women, and; Mobilize Everyone to Balance Power Between Women, Men, and Girls and Boys

Your gift is also supporting Beyond Borders’ work to expand the movement to prevent violence against women and girls and balance power between women and men in seven new partner communities on La Gonâve Island.

The overarching goals are for Haitian women and girls to have their rights respected, to live without violence, and to access balanced power with men and boys. To realize these goals, our objectives are to:

  • Reduce social acceptance of gender inequality, intimate partner violence (IPV), and sexual abuse of women and girls;
  • Decrease experiences and perpetration of IPV and sexual abuse of women and girls;
  • Increase girls’ sense of safety and freedom to make decisions; and,
  • Decrease HIV/SRH (sexual and reproductive health) risk behaviors.

To achieve these objectives, we are following the four phases of SASA!, the three-year community-based methodology that Beyond Borders employs to prevent violence and balance power between women and men. The phases are:

(S)tart: Participants begin thinking about violence against women and girls and HIV as interconnected issues, and foster power within to address them;
(A)wareness: Raise awareness about community acceptance of men's use of power over women;
(S)upport: Support activists directly involved in these interconnected issues by joining the movement; and
(A)ction: Take action. Use power to prevent VAW and HIV.

Thanks to your support, achievements for this quarter include:

1. Held three monthly workshops with 66 Community Activists.

2. Held three day-long workshops to build the capacity of 323 community leaders (200 women) to use SASA!.

3. Held a three-day workshop with 66 church leaders to build their capacity with SASA!.

4. Held two radio soap opera listening & discussion groups with residents in Chen Kontan and Gransous.

5. Held training for 25 journalists (10 women) on how to apply SASA! concepts in reporting themes related to violence against women and girls.

6. Provided a three-day workshop to 70 church leaders, health workers, and community leaders on the Support Phase of SASA!.

7. Provided a three-day workshop to 44 community leaders (22 women) – teachers, merchants, students, and farmers – on the Support Phase of SASA!.

8. Provided a three-day workshop to 225 community leaders – church leaders, teachers, Vodou leaders, farmers, merchants, tradespeople, local elected officials, and members of community based organizations – on the Start Phase of SASA!.

9. Provided a three-day workshop to 95 Community Activists on the Start Phase of SASA!.

Thank You Again

Thank you again for your generosity, your care, your concern, and your commitment to freeing, educating, and empowering girls in Haiti. We are deeply grateful for your support. If you have any questions about what you read in this report, please feel free to call us anytime at (202) 686-2088.

Making kites, traditionally a boy-only activity.
Making kites, traditionally a boy-only activity.
Marching to end violence against girls & women.
Marching to end violence against girls & women.
Organizing to end violence against girls & women.
Organizing to end violence against girls & women.
Meeting with Child Protection Brigade leaders.
Meeting with Child Protection Brigade leaders.
A survivor of child slavery shares her story.
A survivor of child slavery shares her story.

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Organization Information

Beyond Borders

Location: Washington, DC - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @beyondbordersHT
Project Leader:
Kristie van de Wetering
Washington, DC United States
$9,716 raised of $50,000 goal
 
112 donations
$40,284 to go
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