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Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything

by Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital
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Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
admitted injured, these fawn will be released soon
admitted injured, these fawn will be released soon

Dear friend and supporter, 

Next year begins a new and exciting decade and Fellow Mortals 35th year as a wildlife hospital.  Every year, we help more people with wildlife situations and witness how education and information can change a perceived conflict with a wild animal into an opportunity for learning and appreciation of the species' importance to our earth.

As our view shifts from wildlife as 'interlopers' in 'our' space toward understanding that humans are the 'new species on the block,' we see more compassionate acts of people rescuing injured wildlife, being willing to take the time to transport an animal into proper care, and of actions taken and decisions made that prevent unnecessary orphaning and displacement of wild families.

Thanks to your support, Fellow Mortals has completed another year of service to the wild and human communities.

Whether you rescued an injured or orphaned wild animal, made a monetary donation, or a gift of supplies from our wishlist—we thank you for caring about the wild ones.

In 2019, your support made possible:

  • 13,000 hours of care for raptors, deer, endangered/threatened species by licensed wildlife rehabilitators
  • 4,320 hours of orphaned small mammal and songbird care by wildlife interns
  • Rehabilitation of—
    • 407 Eastern Cottontails
    • 200 Eastern Grey Squirrels
    • 16 White-tailed Deer
    • 24 Canada Geese
    • 62 Mallards
    • 48 Wood Ducks
    • 124 American Robins
    • 17 American Goldfinches
    • 18 Cedar Waxwings
    • 57 Mourning Doves
    • 22 Red-tailed Hawks
    • 20 Great Horned Owls
    •  and many others--
  •  5,000 people provided with information and advice on the phone or in person
  •  Education programs and community outreach
  •  Support for law enforcement, humane societies, veterinarians, state and federal agencies

3,650,000 steps?  Shout out to our Team Hope recurring monthly donors--You were with us every step of the way; that's the number of steps one full-time wildlife rehabilitator at Fellow Mortals walks in a year!

Thank you for supporting our work with the wild ones and we wish you and your loved ones a happy New Year!

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Attaching the prosthetic bill
Attaching the prosthetic bill

When the young black-crowned night heron was admitted—near death, emaciated, missing a large portion of the upper bill and with a horrendous injury to one eye—we had a decision to make.  The top bill was broken about midway to the head and could possibly grow back, but the right eye was badly injured and there was no way to know if the bird would be sighted, even if the eye healed.

Black-crowned night heron aren't commonly admitted; they are a nocturnal species and not often encountered by humans.  We made the decision to go ahead and provide life-saving care in the hope that the bird would be releasable, thinking that if that was not ultimately possible, he could be placed in an aquatic exhibit with an established educational center.

After stabilizing the heron with fluids and tube-feeding by putting nutrients directly into his stomach, we started hand-feeding him minnows that had to be held in just the right position where he could grab them from us, one at a time—up to 50 at a time every few hours for the several weeks.  Obviously this couldn't go on forever, and we reached out to our veterinarians and our dentist for help!

Dr. Chris and Dr. Ann  visited Fellow Mortals to assess the heron and Ann carved a prosthesis from wax that was then formed into a plastic piece.

When the temporary prosthetic was ready, our team of Dr. Scot, Dr. Chris and Dr. Ann—three talented, generous, and compassionate professionals—met in surgery to attach it to the broken upper bill.

We had left the eye to heal on its own, which is often the best way, but the scab was starting to lift and we were nervous about what we would find beneath.  Miraculously—when the scab was cut away from the injured eye—we could see the eye was not only intact, but the bird could see from it!

The heron has now doubled in weight and has been self feeding since the surgery.  With his only remaining injury the broken bill, we hope that with time his own natural bill will grow and the prosthesis will fall off, and the bird will be releaseable!

If not for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, wildlife rehabilitators would not be allowed to provide care for wild birds.  We are so grateful we can help when we are needed.

If not for the surgery, this bird would not be able to be kept in captivity and given time to heal.   If not for the person who saw the bird in distress and rescued him, he would not be alive today.

If not for your support, this story would never have been told.  Thank you for the gifts you give the wild ones.

Carved from wax and then formed into plastic
Carved from wax and then formed into plastic
Surgery complete and the right eye is visual!
Surgery complete and the right eye is visual!
Shared by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Shared by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Injured heron at admit
Injured heron at admit

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On July 11, 2019, a man came upon a 12-year old boy who was fishing killdeer out of a sewer—for the second time!

There had been several newly-hatched babies that fell through the grate, but only two were rescued.

The man was heartened by the boy’s compassion and tenacity and determined to find help for the babies, and to transport them to care.

The day-old chicks were cold and in shock when they arrived, and after they were warm, we provided fluids and started hand-feeding them.

Some of you are ‘birders,’ and know that killdeer are not like songbirds, but are precocial and walk and feed themselves within 24 hours of hatching, but when a precocial bird is sick, injured, or has been compromised, it needs special care.

We hand-fed the two chicks every 15 minutes during day and into dark for the next three days. One of the babies was weaker, and we found the sad sight of a lonely baby cuddled up to his dead sibling the morning of the 14th.

We reached out to other Rehabilitators to find a friend for the lonely baby and—just as we were ready to transfer our little survivor into care, we got a call from a state wildlife biologist involved in an endangered species recovery program involved in safeguarding the first nest of Piping Plover at a Chicago, Illinois USA beach in 50 years!

As it happens, the Piping Plover had nested in an area also occupied by Killdeer, another species of protected plover, but with a much healthier population.  

Killdeer have been known to be aggressive toward other birds once their eggs hatch, and the endangered plover chicks were at risk from the adult killdeer.

On July 21, in an action that protected both species' young, four killdeer eggs were carefully delivered to us and put in our incubator. Three hatched beginning July 23, each a day apart.

As precocial babies need time to absorb the remaining yolk sac and dry and preen before leaving the nest site, we waited 24 hours after hatching before introducing the first baby to our hand-raised chick.

He did the rest! He showed that baby and each baby that followed it where to find worms and water and where to hide to sleep and when to drop and act all innocent when humans checked the incubator.

On July 27, an adult male killdeer relocated from the area arrived and the conversation was lively as he introduced himself to the babies who excitedly answered back!

July 31, the youngest chick was 7 days old and all four of the happy family moved to a playpen near the adult.

August 5, another young killdeer was transferred to us from a fellow rehabilitator so that it could be released with a family.

Both the killdeer and piping plover migrate--so you may see one of the birds in this story in your area one day!

We want to thank all of you who have donated this past year--and we're especially grateful to our monthly recurring donors who made care possible for these babies!

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Orphaned beaver
Orphaned beaver

Beaver babies, called 'kits,' are rarely seen in rehabilitation settings, as the babies remain under the watchful eye of parents and older siblings until they are at least one month old.

When we receive a report of a baby beaver alone--we know it's in trouble.

In early June, we got a call late one night about a baby that had been found alone in the Mississippi river--far from shore and with no beaver adults or lodge nearby.  The caller was smart about natural history and kept the baby warm and quiet overnight without providing food.

People often think that food is the most important thing for a baby; in fact, it can cause great harm to feed a starving or injured animal, as the body must use energy for digestion that is needed to keep vital organs functioning.

The little kit arrived the next day and, after rehydration and a monitored short bath in tepid water, was able to take fluids and has gradually been weaned onto a specific diet formulated for use in rehabilitation settings.  He/she is gaining weight and will soon graduate to a bigger pool.

Beaver are very social, and we have a yearling beaver already in care recovering from an injured leg.  Once the baby is older we hope to introduce the two in hopes that they will form a bond and can be released together.

Beaver rehabilitation requires a two-year minimum commitment, as beaver kits do not leave home until they are two years old and strong enough to build a lodge and store food to survive a winter.

As with so many of the animals brought to us for care, your gifts through Global Giving are helping to purchase the special and expensive formula needed to ensure this baby beaver grows well and strong.

Thank you!

 

If you are no longer interested in receiving our project reports, please let the Global Giving program team know.  We know everyone's 'in-box' gets full quickly.

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Nestling Eastern Screech Owls
Nestling Eastern Screech Owls

It's hard to believe we've been helping wildlife for so many years, but this is Fellow Mortals' 34th Spring!  In those years over 50,000 wild ones have received care--and as many have been kept in the wild where they belong.

Education, prevention of injury and orphaning, is as much a part of our mission as is rehabilitation--so we want to say 'Happy Spring' by sharing some tips to help you identify if a wild baby needs your help.

https://youtu.be/qaeEfG78SNU

Fellow Mortals serves the border communities of southern Wisconsin and northeastern Illinois in the United States, but we know some of our supporters live outside of the area we serve.  This information will help you no matter where you are!

Thank you for your gifts from near or far that make a difference for the wild ones found injured or orphaned--and for the wonderful people who take the time to bring them to us for care.

Happy Spring!

Yvonne

 

 

 

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Organization Information

Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital

Location: Lake Geneva, Wisconsin - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @FellowMortals1
Project Leader:
Yvonne Wallace Blane
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin United States
$76,214 raised of $100,000 goal
 
1,624 donations
$23,786 to go
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