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Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything

by Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything
Fellow Mortals--Compassion Changes Everything

On July 11, 2019, a man came upon a 12-year old boy who was fishing killdeer out of a sewer—for the second time!

There had been several newly-hatched babies that fell through the grate, but only two were rescued.

The man was heartened by the boy’s compassion and tenacity and determined to find help for the babies, and to transport them to care.

The day-old chicks were cold and in shock when they arrived, and after they were warm, we provided fluids and started hand-feeding them.

Some of you are ‘birders,’ and know that killdeer are not like songbirds, but are precocial and walk and feed themselves within 24 hours of hatching, but when a precocial bird is sick, injured, or has been compromised, it needs special care.

We hand-fed the two chicks every 15 minutes during day and into dark for the next three days. One of the babies was weaker, and we found the sad sight of a lonely baby cuddled up to his dead sibling the morning of the 14th.

We reached out to other Rehabilitators to find a friend for the lonely baby and—just as we were ready to transfer our little survivor into care, we got a call from a state wildlife biologist involved in an endangered species recovery program involved in safeguarding the first nest of Piping Plover at a Chicago, Illinois USA beach in 50 years!

As it happens, the Piping Plover had nested in an area also occupied by Killdeer, another species of protected plover, but with a much healthier population.  

Killdeer have been known to be aggressive toward other birds once their eggs hatch, and the endangered plover chicks were at risk from the adult killdeer.

On July 21, in an action that protected both species' young, four killdeer eggs were carefully delivered to us and put in our incubator. Three hatched beginning July 23, each a day apart.

As precocial babies need time to absorb the remaining yolk sac and dry and preen before leaving the nest site, we waited 24 hours after hatching before introducing the first baby to our hand-raised chick.

He did the rest! He showed that baby and each baby that followed it where to find worms and water and where to hide to sleep and when to drop and act all innocent when humans checked the incubator.

On July 27, an adult male killdeer relocated from the area arrived and the conversation was lively as he introduced himself to the babies who excitedly answered back!

July 31, the youngest chick was 7 days old and all four of the happy family moved to a playpen near the adult.

August 5, another young killdeer was transferred to us from a fellow rehabilitator so that it could be released with a family.

Both the killdeer and piping plover migrate--so you may see one of the birds in this story in your area one day!

We want to thank all of you who have donated this past year--and we're especially grateful to our monthly recurring donors who made care possible for these babies!

Links:

Orphaned beaver
Orphaned beaver

Beaver babies, called 'kits,' are rarely seen in rehabilitation settings, as the babies remain under the watchful eye of parents and older siblings until they are at least one month old.

When we receive a report of a baby beaver alone--we know it's in trouble.

In early June, we got a call late one night about a baby that had been found alone in the Mississippi river--far from shore and with no beaver adults or lodge nearby.  The caller was smart about natural history and kept the baby warm and quiet overnight without providing food.

People often think that food is the most important thing for a baby; in fact, it can cause great harm to feed a starving or injured animal, as the body must use energy for digestion that is needed to keep vital organs functioning.

The little kit arrived the next day and, after rehydration and a monitored short bath in tepid water, was able to take fluids and has gradually been weaned onto a specific diet formulated for use in rehabilitation settings.  He/she is gaining weight and will soon graduate to a bigger pool.

Beaver are very social, and we have a yearling beaver already in care recovering from an injured leg.  Once the baby is older we hope to introduce the two in hopes that they will form a bond and can be released together.

Beaver rehabilitation requires a two-year minimum commitment, as beaver kits do not leave home until they are two years old and strong enough to build a lodge and store food to survive a winter.

As with so many of the animals brought to us for care, your gifts through Global Giving are helping to purchase the special and expensive formula needed to ensure this baby beaver grows well and strong.

Thank you!

 

If you are no longer interested in receiving our project reports, please let the Global Giving program team know.  We know everyone's 'in-box' gets full quickly.

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Nestling Eastern Screech Owls
Nestling Eastern Screech Owls

It's hard to believe we've been helping wildlife for so many years, but this is Fellow Mortals' 34th Spring!  In those years over 50,000 wild ones have received care--and as many have been kept in the wild where they belong.

Education, prevention of injury and orphaning, is as much a part of our mission as is rehabilitation--so we want to say 'Happy Spring' by sharing some tips to help you identify if a wild baby needs your help.

https://youtu.be/qaeEfG78SNU

Fellow Mortals serves the border communities of southern Wisconsin and northeastern Illinois in the United States, but we know some of our supporters live outside of the area we serve.  This information will help you no matter where you are!

Thank you for your gifts from near or far that make a difference for the wild ones found injured or orphaned--and for the wonderful people who take the time to bring them to us for care.

Happy Spring!

Yvonne

 

 

 

Links:

White-footed Mouse raised from injured orphan
White-footed Mouse raised from injured orphan

On the eve of a new year, I thought it was important to let you know how much your gifts did for the 'least among us' this past year.

The wonderful people who recognize an injured or orphaned animal give a precious gift to the wild one in distress, but they very often can't help with the cost of food, supplies, medicine or care.  It is only your support that bridges the gap between their caring and our caregiving.

Just a couple of days ago, a hawk was admitted from a busy downtown area.  It had been rescued by a homeless woman who went into the post office to ask for a blanket to cover the bird.  A kind man who realized what she was doing offered to drive the bird out to our hospital.

Gifts received through GlobalGiving in 2018 raised nearly $8,000--enough to provide ALL care for 53 birds and mammals who were saved from pain and suffering by a kind person who shares your compassion and respect for wildlife.

Whether it is a tiny mouse rescued from a parking lot, or a new-born fawn who lost her mother--you make happy endings possible for them, just as a local human charity has helped the woman who found the hawk.

Thanks to you, 53 precious lives were saved and will see the dawn of a new year with us.

With my heartfelt thanks that you have chosen to support Fellow Mortals' work.

White-tailed deer fawn healed from injuries
White-tailed deer fawn healed from injuries
White-footed mouse when it was admitted to care
White-footed mouse when it was admitted to care
Newly admitted new-born white-tailed deer fawn
Newly admitted new-born white-tailed deer fawn
Great horned owl (brancher)
Great horned owl (brancher)

With December come preparations for those who celebrate Christmas and observe other winter traditions--and for great horned owls, the cold and clear nights are filled with social events and meet and greets as well--important occasions for this 'tiger of the night,' for this is the time that mated pairs again roost together and new partners are chosen by young birds breeding for the first time, or by those adults who have lost a mate.

Great horned owls are monogamous and often mate for life.  They are the first birds to nest every season and do not build their own nest, but utilize a structure built by another species--sometimes a squirrel, sometimes another bird--or a natural cavity.  The average nest is two to three eggs, laid at the end of January and incubated to hatch at the end of February.

Once the first egg is laid, the female will leave the nest infrequently to stretch her wings or do 'house keeping,' perhaps tidying a branch or moving a piece of uneaten food.  The male, however, is more active than ever, as he is now hunting for two.  Once all the eggs hatch, the male is responsible for providing for the entire family for the first month, until the nestlings are able to maintain their own body temperature without being incubated by the female.  The parents will still be close by, and if the young are threatened the large adults will appear suddently on silent, powerful wings.

When the young owls have fledged (left the nest), at about 4 weeks of age, they will perch on branches around the nest site while the adult owls hunt for the family.  Nature has perfectly timed the birth of the first prey animals to coincide with the needs of the voracious young owls, who grow rapidly in the first weeks of life and will be as large as their parents by six to eight weeks of age--long before they are capable of surviving on their own.

The young of predatory birds stay with their parents much longer than those of young of other species and great horned owls are no exception.  The young birds must not only be capable of flight but must learn from experience and their parents to become proficient hunters before they leave their parents to find their own territory and a mate before embarking on what can be a very long life in the wild.

Great horned owls can be found across North America, and similar species occur world wide.  Not only are these birds magnificent creatures, but they are the top of the pyramid in their niche in nature, and are crucial to maintaining balance in prey populations.

It is a rare privilege to hear the hooting of a great horned owl pair--or a number of individuals on a 'meet and greet' seeking to find a mate or establish a territory, so if you are fortunate to hear their hooting some December evening, remember that while we humans go about the preparations so important to our species, the wild ones have their own rituals and celebrations as well.

Thank you for the support that makes it possible for us to continue to provide help for the great horned owls that come to us injured or orphaned--and for allowing us to educate to inspire respect for all wild ones with whom we share the earth.

Alberta (foster great horned owl) and brancher
Alberta (foster great horned owl) and brancher

Links:

 

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Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

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Organization Information

Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital

Location: Lake Geneva, Wisconsin - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @FellowMortals1
Project Leader:
Yvonne Wallace Blane
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin United States
$72,177 raised of $100,000 goal
 
1,516 donations
$27,823 to go
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