Feed the Change for Farmed Animals

by VINE
Feed the Change for Farmed Animals
Jasper eating hay
Jasper eating hay

Before I say anything else, let me say that VINE Sanctuary stands in solidarity with protestors around the country and around the world who are standing up against racism and insisting that life means more than property. As an organization devoted to social and environmental justice as well as animal liberation, we have always included anti-racist efforts in our work and will continue to do so.

Since the last report, our efforts to care and advocate for animals have been complicated by Covid-19. Nonetheless, we have persisted. Despite having to close the sanctuary to visitors, we did devise protocols to allow animals in life-threatening situations to be brought to the sanctuary for no-contact drop-offs.

Rescued animals who have come to the sanctuary since the last update include 30 "broiler breeder" hens who had been scheduled to be culled and a a group of semi-feral birds seized by authorities from a local farm. The most touching rescue was when we were contacted by a man who had overheard his neighbor planning to kill an unwanted rooster. He talked his neighbor into refraining from killing the bird until he could look for a home, found us, kept the bird in his home overnight, and then brought the bird to us even though doing so required him to drive to a strange place just as our state was shutting down due to the pandemic. Arriving soon will be some roosters rescued from cockfighting and a mother and calf who were going to be sent to slaughter by a dairy.

The pandemic has put our on-site programming on hold, but we have stepped up our efforts to offer opportunities to visit the sanctuary virtually. We've also taken our humane education programs online, which teachers in search of "virtual field trips" for their students have really appreciated.

We know that you too may be struggling due to Covid-19 and/or the upsurge in police violence across the USA. We want to remind you that life at the sanctuary continues as always and to see the sanctuary as a place of refuge for you too. Follow us on social media, where we are doing frequent live streams, to tune into the world beyond the human for a few minutes each day. It can be soothing to see our nonhuman residents living their lives as usual, and it can be heartening to see animals of so many different species living together in harmony.

Of course, life as usual means that our everyday costs continue even as donations drop. Therefore we are especially grateful to you and other donors who have helped to cover the substantial cost of feeding hundreds of animals every day. Thank you again for that!

Sincerely,

pattrice

Livestream schedule
Livestream schedule

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"Cuddle buddies" Jasper the cow and Val the pig
"Cuddle buddies" Jasper the cow and Val the pig

Greetings and thank you again for seeding change by helping to feed animals at VINE Sanctuary!

I hope that you saw the overall 2019 Review for the sanctuary when we shared that on social media. If not, we’ve attached a PDF. We closed out the year with more than 700 animals in residence, having organized or participated in more education and advocacy events than ever before.

None of this would be possible without friends like you. We thought you might like to know about the local folks whose efforts help us to make the most of every dollar you give.

Last Friday, our hay supplier stopped by with a bill and some good news: He got a bargain on bulk baling supplies and decided to pass all of the savings along to us by cutting our price per bale by 10%! Since hay is our largest single outlay, after payroll for our hard-working animal care team, that will be a substantial savings.

The local feed store also helps out by giving us a bulk discount and by donating any “broken bags” (sacks of feed torn in shipping) to the sanctuary.

As part of its “zero waste” efforts, a local grocery store donates big crates of wilted and dented produce twice each week. In addition to saving money, this adds joyful and nutritious variety to the diets of sanctuary residents, who gather around each delivery day, eager to see what surprises might emerge from the crates. (It’s pretty fun to see a cow eating a pineapple!)

One of our volunteers also drives for a “Meals on Wheels” program that delivers fresh produce to low-income seniors and people with disabilities twice monthly. After each run, their own rules say that they must dispose of any produce likely to go bad before the next run. With their permission, that volunteer brings that produce to the sanctuary, so that it will not be wasted.

So, you can see, you really are part of a whole community of generosity in your support for the animals at VINE Sanctuary!

As part of our 20th anniversary celebrations this year, we aim to scale up several of our most effective projects. I’ll tell you more about those projects in another update, but I do want to share one piece of great news: We’ve already managed to add an additional school to our “Barnyard Buddies” program that allows classes to visit to virtually “adopt” sanctuary residents, receiving monthly humane education lessons. In this way, children who may never visit a sanctuary still can learn about and develop empathy for farmed animals.

Thank YOU for being a "barnyard buddy" by supporting the sanctuary!

Sincerely,

pattrice

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Saorise
Saorise

Greetings and thank you again for seeding change by helping to feed animals at VINE Sanctuary.

The flocks and herds at the sanctuary have gained many new members since our last update:

Nearly 100 “spent” hens who had been discarded by a factory-like egg facility joined the flocks in the part of the sanctuary we call “the valley.”

Thirty of the large white roosters and hens bred by the poultry industry moved into the special coop and yard reserved for vulnerable birds like them. Our Anna was part of the rescue team that saved them and hundreds of others.

The wild young cow we call Saorise came to the sanctuary after repeatedly escaping from the farm where she had witnessed the killing of her mother and brother. Another young cow, Izaak Mooton, came to the sanctuary after the person who had rescued him from a dairy was unable to care for him.

As always, hens and especially roosters arrived at the sanctuary singly, in pairs, and in small groups after being rescued or surrendered by people unable to care for them.

We’ve also been busy with the education and advocacy work that is rooted in our on-site care for our nonhuman community members. We’ve had three more monthly meetings of our Pasture Pals humane education for local youth. The special Halloween edition of Pasture Pals was especially well-attended.

Within Vermont, I gave one “Lunch and Learn” talk on the plight of farmed animals to volunteers, staff, and supporters of a rural humane society; presented a lecture on solving social problems by repairing our relationships (including our relationships with “nature” and animals) as part of a “Tend the Root” workshop series on personal transformation for ecological transition; and facilitated a discussion on “Repairing Our Relationships with the More-than-Human World” as part of the “Out in the Open Summit” for rural LGBTQ+ people. Some participants in that summit also made a “field trip” to VINE.

We also presented another workshop in our veganic gardening series — this one on seed saving—at our local public library. Further afield, I gave a lecture on “Queering Animal Liberation” at Rhode Island College. While that talk was not taped, you can watch this video of a similar lecture last year.

Everything we do is rooted in the everyday care and feeding of the more than 600 animals at the sanctuary. We couldn’t do that without you. Thank you again for your support! If you’ve not yet done so, please do consider signing up to make a monthly contribution or using the sharing tools provided by Global Giving to encourage your own social circle to donate.

Izaak Mooton
Izaak Mooton
Hens from egg facility on their 1st day outside
Hens from egg facility on their 1st day outside
Kaporos survivors on their 1st day outside
Kaporos survivors on their 1st day outside

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Fred and George
Fred and George

Greetings and THANK YOU for seeding change by helping to feed animals at VINE Sanctuary.

Over time, we hope to use this campaign on GlobalGiving to fund all of our annual feed costs at the sanctuary. We've still got a long way to go, but we wanted to let you know what's been happening at the sanctuary since we launched this campaign in May.

On-site at the sanctuary, we welcomed a large group of hens, along with one rooster, who had been seized by authorities from a breeder of birds for cockfighting. We also welcomed a group of roosters from a hatching project. As always, birds arrived singly and in pairs or trios from a variety of situations. (Mammals arrive less frequently, but somebody new may be arriving soon.)

Probably the most notable new residents are Fred and George Weasley, red-feathered twin turkeys who were rescued locally. Always side-by-side, they shadow sanctuary staff and visitors alike, constantly curious. It seems likely that they will soon step up to become tour guides, greeting and accompanying guests.

Shasta the undersized cow, who arrived earlier in the year, had a health scare when the vet detected a cardiac abnormality. One visit to a veterinary cardiologist later, we were relieved to learn that the abnormality is not as grave as it first seemed but may be partly responsible for her size (she looks like a calf even though she is a young adult). Shasta has also been adopted by elderly Autumn, whose adopted son Gemini just turned a year old.

Also on-site, our summertime children's program, Pasture Pals, has resumed and will continue to meet monthly into the autumn. This free program includes humane education lessons that teach values such as respecting differences. Each session also age-appropriate volunteer projects, so that participants learn that care for others is something you do, not just something you feel.

All sanctary visitors, whether attendees of our public days, participants in volunteer days for campus and community groups, or residents of nearby group homes who find it soothing to spend time in our leafy surrounds, do the same: help out in some way, so that they truly become part of our community rather than coming to look at or pet our nonhuman community members. Besides showing respect for the animals in residence, this gives people the opportunity to experience the healing effects of altruism.

Our other recent local educational events included a workshop on veganic gardening held in conjunction with the new seed library that we sponsor at our local public library and our annual "Eat the Rainbow" vegan potluck held during Pride Month. We tabled at numerous festivals here in Vermont and around New England, and I spoke at two VegFests in New Hampshire. Further afield, I delivered the Val Plumwood Memorial Lecture at the annual conference of the Australasian Animal Studies Association and our volunteer Julia delivered a talk at the annual Compassionfest event in Connecticut. At the recent Animal Rights National Conference in DC, Anna tabled and gave a presentation on humane education while I spoke about cockfighting, queering animal liberation, and confronting our own speciesism as well as moderated panels on sanctuary ethics and making connections between movements.

All of these off-site activities were rooted in the day-to-day life of our sanctuary community, which inspires people around the world. Speaking about our humane education programs at AR2019, Anna told the stories of young Gemini and his adopted mother Autumn, both discarded by dairies. In my talk about cockfighting at that conference (which you can read here), I noted that everything I know about roosters I learned from roosters — including the things that allowed us to imagine a method for rehabilitating roosters that is now used around the country and around the world. At Compassionfest, Julia shared some of the things we have learned from sheep. (You can read that here.) Speaking in New Zealand, I began by asking conference participants to imagine themselves being greeted skeptically by ducks at the sanctuary. (You can watch that talk here.) Later that day, I had the amazing experience of hearing an artist in Australia who has organized truly creative protests against duck hunting tell me that, even though she has never visited and probably never will, VINE lives in her imagination as a source of inspiration.

You made that possible. Everything we do is rooted in the daily care and feeding of sanctuary residents, and we cannot do that without the support of our wider community of donors. When you buy a bag of sunflower seeds or a bale of hay, you not only feed animals but also help to seed change.

Thank you again for that! If you've not yet signed up to make an automatic monthly donation, you can sign up right here. And if you'd like to feel part of it all, please do like and follow the sanctuary on Facebook and Twitter, where we post photos and other news almost every day.

Sincerely,

pattrice

Gemini, Autumn, and Shasta
Gemini, Autumn, and Shasta
Just a few of the new roos
Just a few of the new roos

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Organization Information

VINE

Location: Springfield, VT - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @VINEsanctuary
Project Leader:
pattrice jones
Springfield, VT United States
$16,756 raised of $80,000 goal
 
360 donations
$63,244 to go
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