Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills

by Dream A Dream
Play Video
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Digital Divine support to the young people
Digital Divine support to the young people

       Ajay has been part of the After School Life Skills through Football Program since the past 3 years. He comes from a middle-class family; his father suffered a knee injury seven years ago and since then has not been able to find a suitable job. The sole bread winner in the family is Ajay’s mother, who works as a house keeper making it very difficult for the family to lead a basic life. Adding to their woes his mother lost her job because of the COVID pandemic and the ensuing lockdown. This completely devastated the family as they were not able to buy even the necessities such as ration or vegetables leave alone medicines for his father. Getting to know the plight of Ajay’s Ajay expresses his gratitude to Dream a Dream.

He says, ‘When Dream a Dream’s facilitator reached out to me to enquire about my wellbeing, I simply poured out all my problems. My facilitator was very understanding and empathized with me. I was supported with one month of medicines for my father’s nerve and knee injuries and provided ration kit for my family. In this critical situation nobody helped for us but Dream a Dream did, it was a big help for me, I am still receiving calls from the Facilitator enquiring about my family’s wellbeing. I am so happy about this and feel somebody is standing for me like a God. My heartfelt Thank you for every facilitator and Dream a Dream for this biggest support in this critical situation in my life. I shall be always grateful to them.’

 

After School Life Skills Programme

In our After School Life Skills Programme, we use creative arts and football as mediums to engage and develop critical life skills among young people between the ages of 8 to 15 years. This programme is an innovation lab where new approaches to life skills development are introduced, demonstrated, documented, evaluated, and fed back into a larger framework for re-imagining learning for young people in the country. To measure the improvements in life skills amongst the young people, we use the Life Skills Assessment Scale (LSAS*).

*The LSAS is the first standardized impact measurement tool in the world to measure improvement in life skills among disadvantaged children.

Highlights of the After School Life Programme

  • The After School Life Programme hosted a well-being meet with our After School life skills partners consisting of government and low-cost schools. This was to create space to share and listen in to their journey in this difficult time with the disruption caused by the 2nd #COVID19 wave. Focused group discussion was conducted for 30 people comprising of 10 principals, 10 teachers and 10 parents to understand their preparedness to reopen the school for young people. At the same time, the intention was to equip them to follow appropriate protocol and safety measures by hearing the insights shared by all the participants.
  • So far 1900 young people have been engaged in life skills intervention for the academic year in the After School Life Skill Development Programme. Young people were thrilled to restart their life skills journey. Batches have been created and allocated to the to begin the session with reintegration to address the new normal that COVID-19 has brought with it.

COVID Relief and Response Report

As the 2nd COVID -19 wave crippled India and the chaos and devastation surged, Dream a Dream formed a core team to respond swiftly to the emerging needs from young people and their communities. In a matter of a week, the team that had over decades worked on life skills related interventions pivoted towards relief related interventions.

The team had 300-400 requests pouring in every day that meant that they had to work and respond quickly on everything from medical requirement, medical awareness, ration, food, emotional and mental health, learning kits, solidarity fund for teachers and young people apart from looking at requests for device support and scholarships. Once we got some grip on the situation the team reached out to the young people and their communities to create awareness on the safety of the vaccine and organized a vaccination drive.

 Below is the support provided to young people and teachers:

           Categories                                                        Completed

  • Ration Kit - Young people and Teachers               17,893
  • Medical Awareness                                               1193
  • Medical Support                                                     490
  • Emotional/Mentor Support                                     872
  • Placement                                                              31
  • Devices                                                                  119
  • Finance Support - Teacher (June + July) **            815
  • Finance Support - Young People                           803
  • Learnt at Home Kits                                               41
  • Internet Recharge                                                  49
  • Vaccination Support                                               353
  • Scholarship                                                             31
  • Total                                                                      22,690

*Updated figures at the time of sending the report.

* For June & July. Also, not included are support extended to 19 teachers as we are waiting for a confirmation for amount getting credited to their bank account.

 

Achievements by the DaD COVID Warriors:

 

1) Responding to Medical requests: We built a strong team dedicated to respond to medical crisis and also build awareness among young people when it comes to Covid-19. We helped young people and their families with medicine support, hospital beds, oxygen support, covid tests and vaccinations. 490 young people have received medical support while 1193 young people have received covid-19 awareness. 

 

2)  Distributing Ration Kits to help families:  The team was also concurrently distributing ration kits to young people, parents, and teachers in the communities as well. Given that many of the young people’s parents lost their jobs because of extended lock downs coupled with the fact that even teachers had not been paid salaries for months together, the teams understood that there were survival related challenges, where both young people and teachers were struggling to make ends meet. We supported 17893 young people and teacher with a ration support.

 

 3)      No child’s learning is left behind due to digital divide and internet support:  With majority of learning going digital, many young people started missing out on education as they did not have devices to attend their class; to address this we have started to provide devices. We supported 119 young people with devices to continue education and provided support for internet data to 49 young people.

 

 4)      Providing Livelihood support: Many of the young people’s parents have lost their livelihood they struggled to make ends meet like paying rent etc.; most of the teachers are struggling with their income being cut making survival difficult. As of date 803 young people and 815 teachers have received financial support. 

 

5)      Young People needed Emotional Support: As the situation worsened, the team on the ground understood that it was critical to continue to extend emotional support as well. Young people were experiencing emotional and mental strain because of different reasons, some because exams were cancelled, others because of the lack of awareness about COVID-19, a few had also taken on additional responsibilities of family, lack of medical care. For some, their existing adversities had further heightened, for others they suddenly had become decision makers in their families, quite a few of them had to deal with the emotional turmoil within their families and some were facing economic pressure because of the loss of jobs. The Dream a Dream’s emotional support group for young people primarily focused on ensuring that the young people had someone to listen and help validate their emotions. 872 young people received emotional support from the team.

 

Testimonials from the Programme:

 

“I am very grateful for the support Dream a Dream is giving me and my family. Just as in the previous lockdown where we got nutrition kits and sessions were conducted even in such difficult times helped us remain positive, this time also during the 2nd wave of COVID  19 and the resulting lockdown, Dream a Dream COVID Warriors helped us in every bit way – be it ration kits, medical assistance, emotional support etc. which helped us in a very big way to overcome the difficult times and stay positive as we were very scared to even move out of our home and completely feeling down.We really thank Dream a Dream for all the help when we reached out to them as we were scared to move out to work and when our family was not getting support even for ration card etc.”-  Ruquiya from Florida English school

Responding to the medical support
Responding to the medical support
Distribution ration kits to young people family
Distribution ration kits to young people family
Ajay
Ajay
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Graduation Day Celebration
Graduation Day Celebration

Kavya  is a bright and talented 12 year old girl studying in the 7th standard in Government School Ambedkar Nagar, Bangalore. She has been part of Dream a Dream’s After School Life Skill through Sports programme for the past 4 years. She comes from a low income family. Her father had abandoned them when she was very young. Since then, her mother has been taking care of the family and is the decision maker. Her mother works as a tailor in a garment factory to provide food and shelter for the family. Kavya’s elder sister also works as a helper in a garment factory to supplement the family income. Kavya’s grandparents take care of her and her elder brother (who studies in the same school in standard 8th) when her mother and elder sister are at work.

When Kavya’s father abandoned them, she went into a deep depression. She became very quiet and withdrawn; she hesitated to mingle with the opposite gender, she did not speak to or felt very uncomfortable speaking with unknown persons too. She had a fear about what other people will think about her and she felt that the boys always ignored her and did not include her in any activities. She remained in her comfort zone mainly with some of her best friends. If the facilitator divided the team for some activity, she would not mingle with anyone in the group and if a situation arose where she had to interact with the members in the group, she simply will not take part in any activities, even if someone asks her, she will not talk and remain silent.

Observing this, our programme facilitator decided to talk to her but before that he spoke to her class teacher and her mother and got to know the difficult circumstances under which Kavya, and her family were living. Having understood the reason for Kavya’s behaviour he started to give her more time and space, he initiated many one-on-one conversations with her. After talking with him, Kavya felt the facilitator’s care and concern and started to respond. The facilitator planed some sessions to make her mingle with others; one such activity was ‘finding the route from the map’, where Kavya took her first step towards mingling with her team, was to helping and guiding her partner to find the way without ending up in a blind corner using the map. She was happy doing this activity and began to slowly mingle with others, not only in the sessions but in her class and elsewhere. Due to the constant encouragement from the facilitator and at the same time watching and learning from him, Kavya learnt how to take initiative, take leadership to do things which would help the whole class. She began to come forward with ideas in the team, rising hand to speak in group, taking attendance and distributing snacks and leading the energizer songs etc during the Programme.

Kavya is now a very strong and bold girl. She has become the class leader and takes the initiative to look after the class. She has become more active than ever.

This is what she has to share with us, “I thought I won’t be able to mingle with anyone, I will be alone forever in my life, but I am very lucky that I enrolled into Dream a Dream’s After School Life Skills programme where I overcame my fear and hesitation and built my confidence; I have changed myself to another person who is very strong, confident and bold. I feel I can now face anything in my life.”

TEACHERS QUOTES: -

Kavya’s class teacher says that Kavya initially used to be good in studies but she became very silent, preferring to be alone in the class and she would not eat anything during the lunch break and when I asked, she would say she is not hungry or if forced to eat she would sit alone and eat her food silently and not respond to any of my questions. Her concentration towards studies and her grades started going down. Sensing something wrong I spoke with her mother and got to know that her father had run away. I gave some time to her and talked to the Dream a Dream facilitator and requested if he could do something; after that slowly she started concentrating in the class, she started to talk in class. I saw her behaviour change - she looked confident, she has started getting good grades and supports her friends also, she takes the initiative to look after the class when I am not in class, she makes everyone to sit quietly and ensures that they are doing classwork. She has changed so much that if she needs any clarification or help, she will directly ask that person. She does not hesitate to speak with unknown people and communicates effectively and confidently. Seeing all these changes I decided to make her the class leader and had turned out to be a very good leader.

PARENTS QUOTES: -

Says her mother, “I was very worried and afraid what will happen to Kavya when her father left us. When her father left us Kavya started to keep to herself all the time, never speaking or asking anything. I would try everything to make her happy and feel safe. I tried to take her for a walk, spend time with her, I tried everything, but she did not come out of the trauma after the incident. I got to know that she was like that in her class and with her friends as well when I spoke to her class teacher.

That is when Kavya’s teacher decided to approach Dream a Dream’s facilitator to see if he could help. All that I know was that the facilitator told me that he will take extra care and give more attention and support to Kavya and after that the change in Kavya was unbelievable!

Kavya started to spend time with her grandfather and grandmother, she started to talk with them and started helping them, she feels comfortable to share her feelings. She started to share about what she did in school, happily mingling with her sister and brother. She started to help me with the household work too. When I come home from work, she comes and happily hugs me and starts sharing what she did at school. Her smile gives me more energy to work hard and build a better future for her. Nowadays she is very happy, and I thank Dream a Dream for changing my daughter and bring back her smile and confidence.

Dream a Dream is a registered, charitable trust empowering children and young people from vulnerable backgrounds to overcome adversity and flourish in the 21st century using a creative life skills approach. Currently, we work with 10,000 young people a year through our two innovation labs – After School Life Skills Programme and Career Connect Programme, have trained over 9,828 teachers/educators from six states and including 19 districts in Karnataka impacting over 2,45,700 children and have impacted over 1 million children through strategic partnerships with state governments in Delhi and Jharkhand. We work on a strong collaborative approach with local charities, corporates, volunteers, governments, expert consultants, and a host of national and international strategic partners.

 

Dream a Dream has been recognized and awarded for innovation, transparency, and accountability over the years by Ashoka, Global Development Network, Harvard, Rockefeller Foundation, Resource Alliance, and others.

Four years ago, we unveiled our five-year strategic plan, which outlined our vision for 2016-21. Since 2016, we have continually invested in research & advocacy to build momentum around our vision of equipping young people from vulnerable backgrounds with life skills. The Research team has published one research paper and in the process of writing two more to be published in the coming financial year. Yes, the journey this far has been very exciting as we have achieved all our objectives by overcoming the many challenges reinforcing our belief that we are we are on the right path. With this report we would like to share some of our key highlights from FY 2019-20 as we move closer to our 2021 vision.

AFTER SCHOOL LIFE SKILLS PROGRAMME:

In our After School Life Skills Programme, we use creative arts and football as mediums to engage and develop critical life skills among young people between the ages of 8 to 15 years. This programme is an innovation lab where new approaches to life skills development are introduced, demonstrated, documented, evaluated, and fed back into a larger framework for re-imagining learning for young people in the country. To measure the improvements in life skills amongst the young people, we use the Life Skills Assessment Scale (LSAS*).

*The LSAS is the first standardised impact measurement tool in the world to measure improvement in life skills among disadvantaged children.

KEY IMPACT INDICATORS OF ASLSP: 2020-21

• In the beginning of the year 24 partner school had agreed to engage in After School Life Skills Programme but due to the COVID19 pandemic we could hold our sessions in 20 partner schools.

• 90% of young people shows positive improvement in at least one Life Skills. – We have collected 1557 baseline and 1557 endline LSAS data. We will analyze and share the improvement scores. 

• 85% attendance across the batches. – Despite the challenges faced by us and the young people regarding availability of smart phones or laptop or computer desktop etc., coupled with issues with internet – availability or bandwidth we managed to achieve 70% attendance by way of accommodating various timings suiting the young people or by aiding for internet packs etc.

• 15 session through blended approach across the batches – We conducted on an average 16 session per batch.

• 20 powerful stories collection that advocates the need for life skills education – We have collected 10 powerful stories of change.

HIGHLIGHTS OF AFTER SCHOOL LIFE SKILLS PROGRAMME:

  •  Enrolled 3036 young people across 185 batches and 2798 young people completed the life skills intervention for the academic year. It was a very challenging year for both young people and us. We had to move all our programmes online. After much brainstorming we adopted the blended approach to engage young people in teaching life skills. The session was delivered in an interactive and effectively engaging manner throughout out the year. Young people also proactively participated in the life skills intervention whether we delivered it through online or off-line mode. We presented them opportunities to come up with their own creative stuff and continue their learning.

 

  •  199 Scholarships was provided to support young people to continue their schooling and learning. Due to the Pandemic parents of many young people lost their jobs leading to many young people working in nearby shops to supplement the family income. They had no means to pay the school fees to attend the online classes. We were approached by many young people seeking financial help in order to continue their education. We then decided with the agreement of many donors to give scholarships to these needy children. The scholarship has really helped these young people to come back to school and continue their leaning.

 

  •  Introduced ‘Learn at Home Sports Kit’ in our sessions; the resulting lockdown due to the pandemic young people were not able to go out on the field and play their sports and learn life skills. This was leading to many physical and emotional issues and challenges. To address this pressing issue, we came up with the sports kit which included a football, a skipping rope, a smiley ball, and a nutrition kit. This initiative allowed young people to play and learn at home. 20 partner schools benefitted from this. At the same time, it also contributed to increasing the attendance percentage in sports session. The Art kit helped young people to be stronger emotionally and sports kit focused on physical wellbeing of young people. This challenging year was special year for us as we could deliver both the programmes to 3036 young people.

 

  •   Anjali a graduate from After School Life Skill programme has been selected as a HundrED youth ambassador. HundrED is a global education nonprofit. Their mission is to help improve education through impactful innovations. Anjali will represent Dream a Dream at the conference and talk about the current educational needs and importance of life skill in school system.

 

  •   On the occasion of women’s day celebration 30 young people from our 3 partner schools participated in woman’s festival football tournament organized by Barca Academy in Whitefield Bangalore. Young people had a great day after a long gap due to the restrictions imposed by the government. They were able to interact with other team members physically. The partner schools won the second, third and fourth place!

 

  •  Successfully Celebrated Graduation Day 2019-20 and 2020-21. After School Life Skill Programme hosted 59 events to celebrate the Graduation Day in a week at 21 Dream a Dream Partner schools, an event that brought together 1470 Young people, 30 Alumni, 1 Donor, 20 Teachers, 22 Dream a Dream staff and 7 other stake holders. The event designed for 2 hours helps young people to reflect and relook their learning journey at Dream a Dream life skills programme. At these events many young people shared their deep resilience stories, what they learned for their life and how deeply they connected with Dream a Dream. And, Yes, there was lots of fun, food, and interactive activities to celebrate the uncertainties.

 

  •  Dream a Dream Presented a Doodle Art Exhibition organized by one of our facilitator Chandrashekar along with two of our young people Ashraf and Ayesh who had taken their creativity to the next level and came up with amazing Doodle Art Frames. “The learn at home kit” helped them to take this creative risk and come with these beautiful and amazing frames.

 

 KEY IMPACT INDICATORS OF ASLSP FOR APRIL 2020 – MARCH 2021:

 

• 5,084 young people are engaging through our After-school Life Skills Programme. 

 

  • 1,205 in Life Skills through Sports.
  • 1,831 in life skills through Creative Arts Programme.
  • 2,048 through reintegration sessions.

 

• We run our sessions in 20 partner’s schools comprising of with 18 Low-Cost Private Schools and 2 Government Schools across Bangalore city.

• The total number of batches in the programme is 185 of which: 

  • 72 batches are in Life Skills through Sports Programme
  • 113 batches are in Life Skills through Arts Programme.
  • Each batch engages 10-20 young people in the core Life Skills Programme.
  • 4542 Session conducted and maintained 70% attendance across the batches.

 

• We have 33 trained Life Skills facilitators to deliver life skills interventions through blended approach.

Young graduate_Anjali
Young graduate_Anjali
Young people@ Barca Academy
Young people@ Barca Academy
Doodle Art Exhibition
Doodle Art Exhibition
Graduation Day Celebration -2
Graduation Day Celebration -2
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Arpita
Arpita

Mount Everest School is a private aided school, which houses students from underprivileged backgrounds. The students who come to this school have parents who work as auto and cab drivers, manual laborer and garment workers. Their parents work long hours, trying to make ends meet. Arpita’s parents are no different.

 Arpita is a bright and diligent student of this school. She is 14 years old and studies in the 9th Grade. Her father paints houses for a living while her mother works in a garment factory. There are times when both her parents are at work and Arpita needs to take care of the household chores and her younger brother, who studies in the 7th Grade in the same school. She has been attending Dream a Dream’s After School Life Skills Programme through the medium of Sports since 5th Grade and according to her class teacher - “Over the years, she has transformed into a leader!

“Growing up in a household when my parents were always fighting, I always felt scared and helpless. I used to sit in a room and cry about it, never letting anybody know I was upset. There was nobody I could share this with, and I didn’t know what I could do to help the situation between my parents, and it was affecting me.”

 “When Nagraj Anna (a facilitator at Dream a Dream) came to our school nearly 2-years ago, I noticed how he used to lead the sessions so skillfully and I was in awe of him. But, at the same time, I was always scared to come into any leadership role, thinking I would not do a good job at it. Moreover, I was always afraid of what everybody else would think. During the sessions, everyone is given a chance to be a leader and even though I always wished I could be one, I tried to avoid being chosen by running to the end of the line and out of Nagraj Anna’s line of sight. It was a struggle with self.”

 “One day, during the football session, we were divided into groups of 4 members and asked to complete a particular task. In my team was a leader who didn’t communicate with any of us and didn’t know how to give the team instructions to follow. All the other teams succeeded in completing the task and we were left with it being incomplete. It made me feel very bad and for a moment, I felt how much better our team would have performed if I were a leader. That was the moment when something shifted in me. The next time I was given an opportunity to lead, I decided to grab it. This kept repeating it to myself and I found myself taking initiative to being picked as a leader and to take up more responsibilities. My confidence increased and as the sessions progressed, I started believing in my own skills and I developed new skills of managing conflict. Inspired by Nagraj Anna’s facilitation skills, I decided to demonstrate these skills at home.”

 “When my parents broke into a fight, as always, instead of running away into a room, I decided to face them and slowly tried to stop them. I first separated them and spoke to them individually and came to a negotiation. This solved the issue. I couldn’t believe it. Soon, I started becoming the mediator between my friends and even during the football sessions.”

 “Nagraj Anna provided me an opportunity to attend Life Skills Day where I got to share my experience of having gained life skills through football sessions and conduct a workshop for nearly 30 students coming from other schools. I was really afraid and nervous but I somehow managed to keep those feelings at bay and conduct the workshops. It was a whole new experience for me, and my confidence just soared.”

 “Looking back at those days when I was always second guessing whether or not I should lead and how I used to hide at the end of the line, to avoid being chosen as a leader, I realised that I have come a long way.”

 Arpita’s teacher Girija says, “I have been teaching in this school for over 4 years now and I can see how much she has changed. We have a good bond and she shares her feelings with me, and I know how much she has helped and solved the situation at home, between her parents. Watching her lead a workshop during Life Skills Day was unbelievable because she never displayed those leadership qualities before. She did a fantastic job!

 Nagraj who is Arpita’s facilitator shared, “I have been taking football sessions in this school and for Arpita’s batch for the past 2-years and I’ve watched her change. Initially, she shied away from taking up any leadership roles and responsibilities. On speaking to her, I realised that she came from a difficult background, where her parents always seemed to be in conflict. She was affected by this and kept thinking that she didn’t have it in her to change the situation. Over time, I observed her slowly step up and take responsibilities and initiatives to lead the students. I believed that she would be able to successfully conduct a workshop during Life Skills Day and that day, she truly proved that she had those leadership qualities within her.

 

Why Dream a Dream and Life skills?

COVID 19 has disrupted the status quo creating space to drive change and equip young people with Life skills to adapt to situations like the one created due to the pandemic. At Dream a Dream, we believe that the 21st century provides an excellent opportunity to young people from vulnerable backgrounds to ‘go beyond’ and step into a future without poverty in spite of not having access to good quality academic education. Young people who are able to adapt to this new, fast changing world through skills and abilities to think creatively, manage conflict, respond with empathy, work in teams, take initiative and be adaptable will be successful in this new world.

 

After School Life Skills Programme:

In our After School Life Skills Programme, we use creative arts and football as mediums to engage and develop critical life skills among young people between the ages of 8 to 15 years. This programme is an innovation lab where new approaches to life skills development are introduced, demonstrated, documented, evaluated, and fed back into a larger framework for re-imagining learning for young people in the country. To measure the improvements in life skills amongst the young people, we use the Life Skills Assessment Scale (LSAS*).

This year is particularly difficult for the young people and the teachers due to the prevailing lockdown due to the COVID 19 pandemic.

The COVID-19 pandemic has created havoc across the world and the number of positive cases keeps increasing every day. A calamity like COVID-19 brings out the best and worst in a society. The first to get affected are the young people who come from difficult backgrounds. The fast act and response measures from the government to curb the pandemic is making life more difficult for marginalized groups.

Many of our young people’s parents are daily wage workers and many of them are dependent on daily, weekly and bi-weekly income; putting an immense amount of stress on them to buy food and other basic everyday needs. Summer is also the time that many young people use to earn money to save for further education. The battle against COVID-19 has made young people feel more vulnerable than before because they wouldn’t be able to afford school/ college fees.

At Dream a Dream, we give all the support a young person needs and more so now. We have formed a team comprising of the Leadership and the programme managers to support young people’s social, emotional and economic needs during these stressful times. We have also formed a team to stay connected and support young people and teachers in our programme. The team answers calls related to awareness and precautions related to COVID-19, give emotional/validation support, advise related to e-learning programme and provide dry ration kits to needy families.

Some of the highlights:

  • The number of Beneficiary enrolled in the programme is 2908, comprising of 1420 boys and 1488 girls.
  • There are 16 female facilitators and 19 male facilitators to conduct the Life Skills sessions.
  • The team has been having virtual session through Whatsapp and Zoom under the reintegration initiative. Till date we have 2908 young people enrolling into the programme which includes 940 young people enrolled under the reintegration initiative.

 

The Global #Whatif movement

Over the last few months, Suchetha Bhat (CEO, Dream a Dream) and Vishal Talreja (Co-founder & Trustee, Dream a Dream) have tried to make sense of everything that has happened / is happening, and specifically its impact on children from marginalized communities. They wrote a series of articles (1,2,3) reflecting on the education system and the insights they were picking up from the ground.

These articles got a great response from the community and people started reaching out with questions on how they can engage and support these reflections. This led to the launch of a Global Movement called #WhatIf. You can read more about it here - https://whatif-global.com/.

The #WhatIf Movement is a community driven initiative with the intention to invite a pause, a moment, a stillness into our being before we can respond to support our children. It is an initiative to explore and discover what could be our most compassionate offer to our children during this pandemic and post when children begin to re-engage with school.

There have been some amazing partners / individuals joining the movement through writing articles, sending across endorsements, creating and sharing resources, engaging with social media and taking the #WhatIf idea to their communities. Since it’s a community driven event, different partners are engaging with it in their own way and driving the thinking.

The overall hope is that the process of reflection and taking a pause will help us change narratives around education and give us a real chance to Reimagine education in a post-COVID world.

 

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Bhavana
Bhavana

After School Life Skills Programme:

In our After School Life Skills Programme, we use creative arts and football as mediums to engage and develop critical life skills among young people between the ages of 8 to 15 years. This programme is an innovation lab where new approaches to life skills development are introduced, demonstrated, documented, evaluated, and fed back into a larger framework for re-imagining learning for young people in the country. To measure the improvements in life skills amongst the young people, we use the Life Skills Assessment Scale (LSAS*).

This year is particularly difficult for the young people and the teachers due to the prevailing lockdown due to the COVID 19 pandemic.

The COVID-19 pandemic has created havoc across the world and the number of positive cases keeps increasing every day. A calamity like COVID-19 brings out the best and worst in a society. The first to get affected are the young people who come from difficult backgrounds. The fast act and response measures from the government to curb the pandemic is making life more difficult for marginalized groups.

Many of our young people’s parents are daily wage workers and many of them are dependent on daily, weekly and bi-weekly income; putting an immense amount of stress on them to buy food and other basic everyday needs. Summer is also the time that many young people use to earn money to save for further education. The battle against COVID-19 has made young people feel more vulnerable than before because they wouldn’t be able to afford school/ college fees.

At Dream a Dream, we give all the support a young person needs and more so now. We have formed a team comprising of the Leadership and the programme managers to support young people’s social, emotional and economic needs during these stressful times. We have also formed a team to stay connected and support young people and teachers in our programme. The team answers calls related to awareness and precautions related to COVID-19, give emotional/validation support, advise related to e-learning programme and provide dry ration kits to needy families.

Some of the highlights for FY2020-21:

The number of Beneficiary enrolled in the programme at the end of August 2020 is 2908, comprising of 1420 boys and 1488 girls.

There are 16 female facilitators and 19 male facilitators to conduct the Life Skills sessions.

We have not been able to conduct the sessions due to the lockdown imposed by the Government due to the COVID 19 outbreak. Therefore, the team has been having virtual session through Whatsapp and Zoom under the reintegration initiative. Till date we have 2908 young people enrolling into the programme which includes 940 young people enrolled under the reintegration initiative.

The Global #Whatif movement

Over the last few months, Suchetha Bhat (CEO, Dream a Dream) and Vishal Talreja (Co-founder & Trustee, Dream a Dream) have tried to make sense of everything that has happened / is happening, and specifically its impact on children from marginalized communities. They wrote a series of articles (1,2,3) reflecting on the education system and the insights they were picking up from the ground.

These articles got a great response from the community and people started reaching out with questions on how they can engage and support these reflections. This led to the launch of a Global Movement called #WhatIf. You can read more about it here - https://whatif-global.com/.

The #WhatIf Movement is a community driven initiative with the intention to invite a pause, a moment, a stillness into our being before we can respond to support our children. It is an initiative to explore and discover what could be our most compassionate offer to our children during this pandemic and post when children begin to re-engage with school.

There have been some amazing partners / individuals joining the movement through writing articles, sending across endorsements, creating and sharing resources, engaging with social media and taking the #WhatIf idea to their communities. Since it’s a community driven event, different partners are engaging with it in their own way and driving the thinking.

The overall hope is that the process of reflection and taking a pause will help us change narratives around education and give us a real chance to Reimagine education in a post-COVID world.

We would like to share some of the Stories of the Young people who rose to the occasion to demonstrate high leadership quality, initiative and empathy –

"I am Bhavana 14years old graduate from Pragna Vidyaniketan School currently I am studying in 10th grade. Today I am going to share my lockdown experience with “Dream a Dream”.
I am very happy and to tell that I'm graduate of “Dream a Dream” programme. This lockdown and pandemic doesn't stop me from chasing my dreams and Passion. I’m a dancer and I like to dance in my free time."

In spite of simply being quarantined at home during this lockdown, I continued my dance classes through an online portal. I practice every day and I sent the recordings to my teacher. My teacher encouraged me to come up with my own choreography. I made my own dance steps and I taught the other children in my locality too. This made them feel very happy.

I learnt how to overcome difficulties through the sessions conducted by “Dream a Dream” and I made use of this skill during the lockdown. I participated at *My Home Days* contest and won a certificate. This made me feel proud, I didn't get bored staying at home because I found new form of lifestyle.

 

Ashraff Unnisa, 13 year old young person from Raza School. She is bold and wants to learn new things. During the lockdown she was extremely worried about the pandemic situations around her. This made to feel dark and gloomy.

There were lot of problems within her household as regards issues with the police and the Covid situation. This made her depressed. Once the Lockdown was over, she started pursuing her interest in drawing with the help of Dream a dream’s facilitator. The skills she built during the sessions helped her build her inner imagination as she tried to depict her problems through her drawings. She is now working on a magazine. She is eagerly waiting to present it with her team picturizes about the past, present, and the future situations which they wanted to address.

 

Swetha graduate from football programme who is passionate about learning football; due to the lockdown her coaching came to a halt and she could not practice football in the field.
Swetha was self-determinate, as not to stop training and used you-tube channels to train herself in football. While creating a learning space for herself and for other too. She was able to teach for the children in her community. She not only taught children the football skills but also brought down their anxiety about covid-19 through football.

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

I learnt the importance of listening to and following instructions through these sessions, which I apply in my daily life, be it in school or at home.” - Prajwal

 

Prajwal is a 14-year-old, 9th Grade student of South End Public School. This school is situated in an area where students are exposed to gang violence, bad language and casual attitudes towards studying and attending school. Majority of the students who attend this school come from underprivileged families, with parents struggling to make ends meet.

 Prajwal comes from a small family of humble means. His father is a cab driver, while his mother is a housewife. His younger brother studies in the 5th grade in the same school. Both Prajwal and his younger brother are part of Dream a Dream’s After School Life Skills Programme through the medium of Sports.

 Prajwal has been a part of Dream a Dream’s sessions for the past 6 years. He remembers being a young boy who had a lot of anger pent up, who never listened to anybody. Maheshwaran, the Dream a Dream facilitator expressed, “When I first started taking sessions for Prajwal’s batch, he was in the 7th Grade. I observed how naughty he was. He would keep disturbing the sessions, make his friends fight and then act like he had nothing to do with it. He would never listen to any of my instructions and kept aloof during the sessions. When I spoke to his teachers, they had the same complaint. As he was good in academics, so he used to get away with this behaviour.” He spent some time working with Prajwal, giving him responsibilities of distributing snacks and leading a few activities in the sessions. He wanted Prajwal to acknowledge his own potential and work towards developing those leadership skills of taking initiative, being calm when there was a conflict and working together as a team to solve issues. Prajwal shared, “When I first started coming for these sessions, I didn’t know anything about football. I just came for fun and the snacks. A couple of years ago, when Maheshwaran Anna started taking the sessions, he shared his personal story which helped me deal with my anger issues. I feel I have learnt the skill of being patient during tough situations, during the football games.”

 

Through the sessions, he feels he has learnt the skills of working together as a team to solve problems. He remembers an activity conducted by Maheswaran, the Dream a Dream facilitator when they tried very hard to work individually to complete the task but towards the end, realised that if they had worked together, how much more efficient it would have been. This learning stayed with him and he tried to incorporate that not only during the football sessions but in other school activities as well. His principal shared, “We recently conducted pongal celebrations in the school, and Prajwal was given the opportunity to lead. He did such a wonderful job in ensuring that the celebrations went off well. Instead of doing it all on his own, he delegated work to his classmates and through good team work, ensured that everything went off well.” Prajwal’s mother has also seen a change in his behaviour at home. “He used to get angry and lose his temper if he didn’t get his way. Now, he is much calmer and his anger has reduced considerably.”

 

What caused this shift? Prajwal said, “Initially I just came for the snacks and then slowly, the facilitator started giving us opportunities to play in tournaments. He believed that I could play well and be a leader. This made me believe in myself and my own skills.” When asked what differentiated his facilitator from his teachers, Prajwal smiled and said, “The facilitator is serious when the situation demands it and fun during other times, whereas the teachers are always serious.

 Maheshwaran shared on why he feels Prajwal has truly changed, “From the boy who never listened to instructions and kept heckling during the sessions, he has come a long way. Today, when I give him a task, he will do it and take it many steps further, with a lot more effort and creativity. He takes initiative in helping with the sessions.

 Thriving for Prajwal is accepting his potential and working hard to change his behaviour. It is him working on himself and pushing himself to take initiative in helping others, leading others and working together towards succeeding at a task. Thriving is Prajwal role-modeling his facilitator and becoming patient and silent when dealing with conflict and being careful in not letting his anger get the better of him and hurt someone else. It is him seeing the greater good of the team and pushing for that, in every action.

 

Dream a Dream works through three key programmes, ASLSP and CCP which directly impacts young people and the Teacher Development Programme (TDP) which indirectly impacts young people through teachers. In ASLSP and CCP, we use a creative life skills approach where young people can make better choices and become more meaningfully engaged. TDP engages teachers to indirectly impact young people and is designed to nurture empathy, expand their creativity, develop listening and validation skills and the ability to share with authenticity while also learning facilitation skills.

Currently, we work with 10,000 young people a year through our two innovation labs – After School Life Skills Programme (ASLSP) and Career Connect Programme (CCP), have trained over 7,700 teachers/educators from 206 partners impacting over 1,92,500 children and have impacted over 1 million children through strategic partnerships with state governments in Delhi and Jharkhand. We work on a strong collaborative approach with local charities, corporates, volunteers, governments, expert consultants and a host of national and international strategic partners.

The impact evaluation of the life skills approach implemented across all the three programmes of Dream a Dream for the year 2018-2019 documents the best practices and innovations to provide inputs and insights for national and international level policies and programmes in life skills education. Dream a Dream has a standardized impact assessment scale for Life Skills – Life Skills Assessment Scale (LSAS) – to measure life skills. The LSAS developed in-house is a first of its kind, published and standardized scale that is being used by NGOs/Schools to assess improvement in life skills - http://globaled.gse.harvard.edu/files/geii/files/dream_life_skills_assessment_scale_final_2.pdf.

Major findings from our impact evaluation include: 1) All three programmes (ASLSP, CCP, TDP) showed improvement in life skills of young people. 2) The improvement in scores was statistically significant for all three programmes. 3) Male and female participants improved in each of the five life skills measured. 4) The Last Mile Support Programme (LMSP) showed that 97.6% of the young people were meaningfully engaged. 5) Life skilling teachers through TDP helped in improving the life skills of students. Through the teachers, life skills of students have improved drastically.

Based on the evidence of the impact evaluation, it is clear that all programmes are on-track to achieve its intended results. The findings of the study indicate that the results of all intervention strategies were effective in developing and nurturing life skills among the participants. Our impact report for FY2018-19 can be shared upon request.

Dream a Dream has been recognized and awarded for innovation, transparency and accountability over the years by Ashoka, Global Development Network, Harvard, Rockefeller Foundation, Resource Alliance and others. These videos talk about our work - https://vimeo.com/124809296 and https://vimeo.com/124817309

 

 

AFTER SCHOOL LIFE SKILLS PROGRAMME

 In our After School Life Skills Programme, we use creative arts and football as mediums to engage and develop critical life skills among young people between the ages of 8 to 15 years. This programme is an innovation lab where new approaches to life skills development are introduced, demonstrated, documented, evaluated, and fed back into a larger framework for re-imagining learning for young people in the country. To measure the improvements in life skills amongst the young people, we use the Life Skills Assessment Scale (LSAS*).

 *The LSAS is the first standardized impact measurement tool in the world to measure improvement in life skills among disadvantaged children.

Young People at Women's Day Marathon
Young People at Women's Day Marathon
Prajwal from South End School
Prajwal from South End School
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Dream A Dream

Location: Bangalore, Karnataka - India
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @dreamadreamind
Project Leader:
Vishal Talreja
Cofounder & CEO
Bangalore, Karnataka India
$62,457 raised of $230,000 goal
 
794 donations
$167,543 to go
Donate Now
Inmportant: GlobalGiving is currently unable to disburse funds to this project. Please note that this is due to restrictions on GlobalGiving’s ability to disburse to Indian-banked organizations and not a reflection on this project. GlobalGiving is one of the many nonprofits on whom these restrictions have been put. Learn more
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

Dream A Dream has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.