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Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills

by Dream A Dream
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Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills
Empower Vulnerable Young People with Life Skills

I learnt the importance of listening to and following instructions through these sessions, which I apply in my daily life, be it in school or at home.” - Prajwal

 

Prajwal is a 14-year-old, 9th Grade student of South End Public School. This school is situated in an area where students are exposed to gang violence, bad language and casual attitudes towards studying and attending school. Majority of the students who attend this school come from underprivileged families, with parents struggling to make ends meet.

 Prajwal comes from a small family of humble means. His father is a cab driver, while his mother is a housewife. His younger brother studies in the 5th grade in the same school. Both Prajwal and his younger brother are part of Dream a Dream’s After School Life Skills Programme through the medium of Sports.

 Prajwal has been a part of Dream a Dream’s sessions for the past 6 years. He remembers being a young boy who had a lot of anger pent up, who never listened to anybody. Maheshwaran, the Dream a Dream facilitator expressed, “When I first started taking sessions for Prajwal’s batch, he was in the 7th Grade. I observed how naughty he was. He would keep disturbing the sessions, make his friends fight and then act like he had nothing to do with it. He would never listen to any of my instructions and kept aloof during the sessions. When I spoke to his teachers, they had the same complaint. As he was good in academics, so he used to get away with this behaviour.” He spent some time working with Prajwal, giving him responsibilities of distributing snacks and leading a few activities in the sessions. He wanted Prajwal to acknowledge his own potential and work towards developing those leadership skills of taking initiative, being calm when there was a conflict and working together as a team to solve issues. Prajwal shared, “When I first started coming for these sessions, I didn’t know anything about football. I just came for fun and the snacks. A couple of years ago, when Maheshwaran Anna started taking the sessions, he shared his personal story which helped me deal with my anger issues. I feel I have learnt the skill of being patient during tough situations, during the football games.”

 

Through the sessions, he feels he has learnt the skills of working together as a team to solve problems. He remembers an activity conducted by Maheswaran, the Dream a Dream facilitator when they tried very hard to work individually to complete the task but towards the end, realised that if they had worked together, how much more efficient it would have been. This learning stayed with him and he tried to incorporate that not only during the football sessions but in other school activities as well. His principal shared, “We recently conducted pongal celebrations in the school, and Prajwal was given the opportunity to lead. He did such a wonderful job in ensuring that the celebrations went off well. Instead of doing it all on his own, he delegated work to his classmates and through good team work, ensured that everything went off well.” Prajwal’s mother has also seen a change in his behaviour at home. “He used to get angry and lose his temper if he didn’t get his way. Now, he is much calmer and his anger has reduced considerably.”

 

What caused this shift? Prajwal said, “Initially I just came for the snacks and then slowly, the facilitator started giving us opportunities to play in tournaments. He believed that I could play well and be a leader. This made me believe in myself and my own skills.” When asked what differentiated his facilitator from his teachers, Prajwal smiled and said, “The facilitator is serious when the situation demands it and fun during other times, whereas the teachers are always serious.

 Maheshwaran shared on why he feels Prajwal has truly changed, “From the boy who never listened to instructions and kept heckling during the sessions, he has come a long way. Today, when I give him a task, he will do it and take it many steps further, with a lot more effort and creativity. He takes initiative in helping with the sessions.

 Thriving for Prajwal is accepting his potential and working hard to change his behaviour. It is him working on himself and pushing himself to take initiative in helping others, leading others and working together towards succeeding at a task. Thriving is Prajwal role-modeling his facilitator and becoming patient and silent when dealing with conflict and being careful in not letting his anger get the better of him and hurt someone else. It is him seeing the greater good of the team and pushing for that, in every action.

 

Dream a Dream works through three key programmes, ASLSP and CCP which directly impacts young people and the Teacher Development Programme (TDP) which indirectly impacts young people through teachers. In ASLSP and CCP, we use a creative life skills approach where young people can make better choices and become more meaningfully engaged. TDP engages teachers to indirectly impact young people and is designed to nurture empathy, expand their creativity, develop listening and validation skills and the ability to share with authenticity while also learning facilitation skills.

Currently, we work with 10,000 young people a year through our two innovation labs – After School Life Skills Programme (ASLSP) and Career Connect Programme (CCP), have trained over 7,700 teachers/educators from 206 partners impacting over 1,92,500 children and have impacted over 1 million children through strategic partnerships with state governments in Delhi and Jharkhand. We work on a strong collaborative approach with local charities, corporates, volunteers, governments, expert consultants and a host of national and international strategic partners.

The impact evaluation of the life skills approach implemented across all the three programmes of Dream a Dream for the year 2018-2019 documents the best practices and innovations to provide inputs and insights for national and international level policies and programmes in life skills education. Dream a Dream has a standardized impact assessment scale for Life Skills – Life Skills Assessment Scale (LSAS) – to measure life skills. The LSAS developed in-house is a first of its kind, published and standardized scale that is being used by NGOs/Schools to assess improvement in life skills - http://globaled.gse.harvard.edu/files/geii/files/dream_life_skills_assessment_scale_final_2.pdf.

Major findings from our impact evaluation include: 1) All three programmes (ASLSP, CCP, TDP) showed improvement in life skills of young people. 2) The improvement in scores was statistically significant for all three programmes. 3) Male and female participants improved in each of the five life skills measured. 4) The Last Mile Support Programme (LMSP) showed that 97.6% of the young people were meaningfully engaged. 5) Life skilling teachers through TDP helped in improving the life skills of students. Through the teachers, life skills of students have improved drastically.

Based on the evidence of the impact evaluation, it is clear that all programmes are on-track to achieve its intended results. The findings of the study indicate that the results of all intervention strategies were effective in developing and nurturing life skills among the participants. Our impact report for FY2018-19 can be shared upon request.

Dream a Dream has been recognized and awarded for innovation, transparency and accountability over the years by Ashoka, Global Development Network, Harvard, Rockefeller Foundation, Resource Alliance and others. These videos talk about our work - https://vimeo.com/124809296 and https://vimeo.com/124817309

 

 

AFTER SCHOOL LIFE SKILLS PROGRAMME

 In our After School Life Skills Programme, we use creative arts and football as mediums to engage and develop critical life skills among young people between the ages of 8 to 15 years. This programme is an innovation lab where new approaches to life skills development are introduced, demonstrated, documented, evaluated, and fed back into a larger framework for re-imagining learning for young people in the country. To measure the improvements in life skills amongst the young people, we use the Life Skills Assessment Scale (LSAS*).

 *The LSAS is the first standardized impact measurement tool in the world to measure improvement in life skills among disadvantaged children.

Young People at Women's Day Marathon
Young People at Women's Day Marathon
Prajwal from South End School
Prajwal from South End School
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Tharunya @ After School Life Skills Programme
Tharunya @ After School Life Skills Programme

Dream a Dream empowers young people from vulnerable backgrounds to overcome adversity and flourish in a fast-changing world, using a creative life skills approach. Dream a Dream has crafted a pedagogical method and a process - a science that allows for a re-definition of adverse circumstances by changing the lens through which the past is viewed. Our programmes seek to improve outcomes for students by creating positive learning experiences through a collaborative approach that targets young people, parents, teachers, mentors, and volunteers.

Dream a Dream works through three key programmes, After School Life Skills Programme (ASLSP) and Career Connect Programme (CCP) which directly impacts young people and the Teacher Development Programme (TDP) which indirectly impacts young people through teachers. In ASLSP and CCP, we use a creative life skills approach where young people can make better choices and become more meaningfully engaged. TDP engages teachers to indirectly impact young people and is designed to nurture empathy, expand their creativity, develop listening and validation skills and the ability to share with authenticity while also learning facilitation skills.

Currently, we work with 10,000 young people a year through our two innovation labs – After School Life Skills Programme (ASLSP) and Career Connect Programme (CCP), have trained over 7,700 teachers/educators from 206 partners impacting over 1,92,500 children and have impacted over 1 million children through strategic partnerships with state governments in Delhi and Jharkhand. We work on a strong collaborative approach with local charities, corporates, volunteers, governments, expert consultants and a host of national and international strategic partners.

The impact evaluation of the life skills approach implemented across all the three programmes of Dream a Dream for the year 2018-2019 documents the best practices and innovations to provide inputs and insights for national and international level policies and programmes in life skills education. Dream a Dream has a standardized impact assessment scale for Life Skills – Life Skills Assessment Scale (LSAS) – to measure life skills. The LSAS developed in-house is a first of its kind, published and standardized scale that is being used by NGOs/Schools to assess improvement in life skills - http://globaled.gse.harvard.edu/files/geii/files/dream_life_skills_assessment_scale_final_2.pdf

Dream a Dream has been recognized and awarded for innovation, transparency and accountability over the years by Ashoka, Global Development Network, Harvard, Rockefeller Foundation, Resource Alliance and others. These videos talk about our work - https://vimeo.com/124809296 and https://vimeo.com/124817309 

 

After School Life Skills Programme

 In our After School Life Skills Programme, we use creative arts and football as mediums to engage and develop critical life skills among young people between the ages of 8 to 15 years. This programme is an innovation lab where new approaches to life skills development are introduced, demonstrated, documented, evaluated, and fed back into a larger framework for re-imagining learning for young people in the country. To measure the improvements in life skills amongst the young people, we use the Life Skills Assessment Scale (LSAS*).

 

*The LSAS is the first standardized impact measurement tool in the world to measure improvement in life skills among disadvantaged children.

 

                   Dream a Dream has given me life!

              Tharunya is a bold and confident 13-year-old girl studying in Siri School in Bangalore. This school is situated close to an industrial area and has children of factory workers, manual laborers and garment factory workers attending. These children come from impoverished backgrounds; while their parents are busy at work, trying to make ends meet these children are forced to take care of themselves, their siblings and the household chores. 

 Tharunya’s story is not very different. Her father works as a manual labourer in a vegetable market while her mother is a tailor in a garment factory putting in long working hours. She is the eldest of the siblings and has to takes care of the household chores, which include cooking, cleaning the house, washing the clothes and helping with her younger brother’s studies, while her parents are at work. Her parents initially had her studying in their village back home as they couldn’t afford two tuitions but brought her to the city close to six years ago, when they realized she could keep her younger brother company and study in the same school as him.

 When speaking to one of her teachers, they said, “Tharunya was incredibly shy when she first came to school. She seemed very afraid to give her opinion or answer in class. Even though it’s been a few years since she came to the city and to our school, she remained shy. Unless I called her name, she would never come forward. A good, hardworking and obedient student, Tharunya did what she was told and never took the initiative to do anything more.” Having moved from a Kannada medium school to a school in the city, where the medium of communication was English, Tharunya says that she took some time to adjust and she felt a bit scared to talk to anyone, for fear of being judged. She never mingled with boys and kept to herself and a few girls, she had befriended.

 “When Dream a Dream first came to our school, close to three years ago, I was scared again. I kept wondering how I would interact with a new teacher. But, when the sessions started, I found the facilitators to be very friendly. They were not like our teachers. They didn’t scold us. They listened to us.”

Shruthi, who has been a facilitator for the After School Life Skills Programme in Siri School for the past two years expressed how Tharunya was very silent and seemed very cautious during the first few sessions. Having noticed that their batch always sat in separate groups of boys and girls, she ensured that she mixed them up, making them form groups with a good gender balance. The school was very strict about boys and girls interacting and it was very hard for the facilitator to explain to the students that these sessions would have them interacting and engaging with each other, in a friendly manner.

Tharunya says that this was the first time she realized that girls were not very different from the boys in her class. With interesting check-in questions and other activities, where they all had to think on the spot, Tharunya was being exposed to a new version of herself, which was outside her comfort zone. She began to pay attention to what the others were saying and feels she learnt so much from observing them and soon realized that this was a space where nobody would judge her. The facilitator held space for everyone, including Tharunya as she slowly worked up the courage to explore her talents, one step at a time. From becoming bolder and confident, while she spoke, she also started taking initiatives in ensuring that their groups always had a mixture of boys and girls. 

 Over a period of time her teachers in class found her volunteering to answer questions, on her own and slowly, was participating in all extra-curricular activities as well. Tharunya speaks boldly and confidently with everyone now and she communicates freely with the boys, as her peers. When speaking to her parents, they have also noticed a change and were very supportive of her decision to join Karate classes. They are very proud of how she has transformed into a responsible and bold child.

 Tharunya says that she remembered one day when the facilitator conducted an activity where they all had to write down their dreams and talk about it. During that session, Tharunya watched and listened to her classmates talk about becoming a doctor, engineer etc. and she wondered why nobody was thinking creatively and out-of-the-box. A few days later, she came forward and told the facilitator that she wanted to become a Karate Coach. All this while, during the sessions, her mind was stuck on gender equality. She was thinking deeply about how girls are unsafe and need to protect themselves and she felt that if she learnt this herself and could teach others, she would be helping other girls defend themselves. Inspired by how the facilitators from Dream a Dream were helping students like herself be empowered with life skills, she wanted to make a difference as well.

 From a shy, quiet girl who was making herself invisible, Tharunya has come a long way in pushing herself out of her comfort zone. Thriving for Tharunya is her wanting to give back to the community by ensuring that girls like her are empowered and feel safe. Thriving for Tharunya is ensuring gender balance wherever she goes. 

 Thriving for Tharunya is empowering herself so that she can in turn, empower others.

 One of the teachers said, “I see Tharunya as a completely different student now and everything she does, even when explaining what I have taught in class, she does it in her own way and in her own style. The attendance in my class has increased and now nearly every one of them is present and I know that this is because of the After School Life Skill sessions. They keep telling me how the facilitators are teaching them so many new things and I am learning from them as well.”

 Principal of Siri School: “Dream a Dream is making our dreams come true. I have seen tremendous changes in the students like Tharunya after Dream a Dream started their After School Life Skills Program through the medium of Arts in our school. The behavior of our students with their parents, teachers and society is very different than students in other schools. If you ask them to speak about any topic, they will come forward without any hesitation. They have developed confidence in their own abilities. When they are home, they take up the responsibility of taking care of household chores and help their parents. All of this is due to the life skills they have learnt in these sessions.

 

Impact of our After-School Life Skills Programme:

  • Overall enrolment in the programme for the FY2018-19 was 5,658 students.
  • Total of 3,275 students opted for Creative Arts and 2,383 opted for Football.
  • The programme achieved a healthy balance in terms of gender participation where 48.63% participants were female.
  • The average attendance rate was 89% and the average retention rate was 94%.
  • 96.8% of the tracked participants were more focused and willing to complete studies and achieve their Dream goals. 
  • 96.9 % of the participants had an end line score above norms and thus improved their skills to deal with challenges.
  • 96% of the participants have seen a positive change after 2 years of reengagement. 
Young People at "LEARN BY ART" event
Young People at "LEARN BY ART" event
Magazines released by the young people
Magazines released by the young people
Young People @ Life Skills Day 2019 event
Young People @ Life Skills Day 2019 event
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Young people celebrating World Music Day
Young people celebrating World Music Day

Neha is a 14-year-old girl, studying in South End School. Her father has his own business while her mother is a home maker. One of her sisters is married and stays with her husband’s family while the other sister is studying in PES College. Being the youngest in her family, Neha always had her way and she never cared enough to be disciplined, always prone to doing whatever she liked, whenever she liked.

 Even though she was playing football, through Dream a Dream’s After School Life Skills Programme, she wasn’t really very interested and had great difficulty in following instructions, ending up disturbing sessions. The other students were always complaining to the facilitator about how she refused to listen to them, making it difficult to work together as a cohesive team. Having observed her for a number of sessions, the facilitator realised that Neha was weak in certain life skills and decided to select her for ‘Play for Change’. This is an annual event, designed for students who need a little more help in developing life skills. 5 boys and 5 girls from each school where Dream a Dream hold these sessions are invited to participate. The facilitator would soon see how this event would shape Neha not only into a strong team player but also a leader!

 Neha reminisces about how she felt when she first attended the event, “I saw so many children like me and I was immediately scared of how I would interact with them. I was always very silent, even with my own classmates so I was even more anxious about how I would interact with these completely new students.” The facilitators there divided the group of students into smaller teams and Neha was in a team with 6 boys and 4 girls. Absolutely uncomfortable with new people, she decided to remain silent and not speak at all, while the other students were sharing and talking about strategies to win. The facilitators kept encouraging everyone to participate and that gave her a little bit of courage. After a short while, she decided to speak and share her opinion and ideas on how they should all play and communicate with each other during the game. Following her ideas, her team went forward and played the match, drawing with the other team, with two goals each. Neha began to instruct her team members and before she knew it, she was evolving into a leader, developing skills of working together as a team, while giving instructions and following them herself. She learnt how to work together as a team, and when they won their 3rd match, she was ecstatic! When asked what she learnt from this event, she says, “Team-work! I learnt how to communicate, coordinate, discuss with each other, focus and mainly how to keep encouraging each other to keep going!

The Neha that returned from the ‘Play for Change’ event was someone entirely different! The facilitator began to notice how she started coming in earlier for the sessions. The After School Life Skills Programme, through the medium of football usually begins with a check-in question, where the students share how they’re feeling and the facilitator gets a pulse on their moods. Neha began initiating forming a circle for this activity on her own, interacting with the other students which was completely new. The facilitator also observed how she started taking the lead on many activities, without him pushing her to do any of this. He began to respond to her change by praising her about her positive changes in behaviour and attitude.

 Neha’s close friend, Meghanna also noticed how her friend who hardly interacted with anyone began taking initiative to make friends, taking leadership and initiative in activities and also becoming responsible at home. She feels that this happened after Neha attended the ‘Play for Change’ event, organised by Dream a Dream. Her teacher, having observed her evolution, said, “Neha has learnt discipline, leadership and how to support others in the school. All of this is because she got an opportunity in Dream a Dream’s After School Life Skills Programme.

 Neha looks back at her journey and says, “I feel incredibly happy, having joined Dream a Dream’s Life Skills Programme! I have changed a lot and learnt a lot about being a leader, taking responsibility for my actions and solving problems as a team. My concentration has improved, not only during the sessions but even at home when I study and help my mother with some household chores.”

 Empowered with these life skills, Neha is hoping to join the army where she will use her discipline and hard work in serving the country!

Cluster level football tournament
Cluster level football tournament
Satish representing India at Homeless World Cup'19
Satish representing India at Homeless World Cup'19
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Satish Proud of His Own Goal

After failing his class 10 examinations, Satish dropped out of the low-cost private school he was attending in Bengaluru, disillusioned and unmotivated. The only thing that saved the teenager from giving up on his future altogether was his passion for football.

Satish was just 12 when he first became acquainted with the beautiful game as part of Dream a Dream’s after school life skills programme. Eight years later, the 20-year-old is representing India in the Homeless World Cup currently underway (July 27 - August 3) in Cardiff, Wales.

This football tournament, with its own set of rules, has been part of the global sports calendar since 2002, drawing crowds of 80,000 and watched by millions online around the world. The Indian team will be one of over 50 others comprising hand-picked individuals from communities in adversity.

Chosen for his speed, behaviour on the pitch and great technique, Satish says: “If you fail in exams and drop out of school, people will look down on you. I wanted one chance to prove that I can work hard to achieve my goals. Reaching where I am today, despite family apprehensions, has been a big achievement. It is a big honour for me to represent my country.”
Fun and Games

Most often it is difficult for outsiders to understand what it is we do, till they get their hands - and feet - dirty!

Volunteers from our partner organisation Standard Chartered GBS recently participated in one of our After School Football Life Skills sessions and experienced what the children do. Responses from a few of them are telling: 

“The activities done today were really helpful in bringing energy to the children and volunteers. It also provided the chance for the student to know about corporate culture and areas to look at to build careers.”

“I felt I was back to my childhood!” 

“It was wonderful to see the enthusiasm in the children and how open they were to interact with us. I got reminded of my school days.”

Project Thrive Goes Live

Our end goal has always been to see the young people who engage in our programmes thrive. But what does thriving look like? How do we know if our life skills programmes have had that desired impact?

To better understand the behavioural and social indicators of ‘thriving’ - and its nuances - among young people disadvantaged by adversity, we commissioned a research study which has just been published and can be viewed here.

It proves what we have believed all along - that life skills indeed are the essential ingredients for thriving.
Satish at the Homeless World Cup
Satish at the Homeless World Cup
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Tree Planting at Graduation Day 2019
Tree Planting at Graduation Day 2019

"There has been a positive change in my life and I can use the knowledge that I learned from the After School Life Skills Programme to lead small games, manage team members, and make decisions on my own and not just follow others. I have also learned how to respect others while they are talking in the group and I feel very happy that Dream a Dream has given me this opportunity." - Prakruthi C

Prakruthi C is from Mount Everest School. She is 16 year- old and in the 9th standard. She has been a part of Dream a Dream's After School Life Skills Programmes since 2012. Her father is a mechanic and her mother is a housewife.

At the start of the programme, Prakruthi showed many signs of anger. However, after attending regular sessions it was gradually decreasing. The facilitator of the batch noticed this and identified certain activities that created a space for her to express herself control her anger.

In one particular activity called 'Wrong Behaviour', young participants shared their understanding of what kinds of wrong behaviours are there and some examples of them. During that session, Prakruthi shared her feelings about how making others feel sad can be a wrong behaviour. At that point, the facilitator asked her why she thought that was wrong and she said reflected on a few incidents in the past where she made others feel sad and that it made her feel guilty. The next day, Prakruthi asked the facilitator if she is a bad person. The facilitator asked her what all she likes about herself and she began to reflect again and go deeper. Over the next few sessions, she reflected more on that and came up with great new ideas to control her anger and be happy around others.

The facilitator asked her what challenges she experienced and how she overcame them. She said that every time anyone puts her down her instantaneous reaction is anger. She said that she used to find it difficult to share anything during reflection circles, but one day she saw one of her friends sharing and enjoying the process. She realised that she wanted to feel the same way and enjoy the session too. The facilitator then began to encourage her to share more during reflection circles. During one of these sessions, she said that she does not get a chance to play in any of the activities and small games because she feels everyone puts her down and does not give her an opportunity, which is why she is silent during sessions. After sharing this, the facilitator asked her to lead the team while playing the next football match. She led the team very well and started to display more confidence, and gradually started motivating herself during the life skills sessions.

 

Dream a Dream is a registered, charitable trust empowering children and young people from vulnerable backgrounds to overcome adversity and flourish in the 21st century using a creative life skills approach.Currently, we work with 10,000 young people a year through our two innovation labs – After School Life Skills Programme and Career Connect Programme, have trained over 7,700 teachers/educators from 206 partners impacting over 1,92,500 children and have impacted over 1 million children through strategic partnerships with state governments in Delhi and Jharkhand. We work on a strong collaborative approach with local charities, corporates, volunteers, governments, expert consultants and a host of national and international strategic partners.

Dream a Dream has been recognized and awarded for innovation, transparency and accountability over the years by Ashoka, Global Development Network, Harvard, Rockefeller Foundation, Resource Alliance and others.

 Three years ago, we unveiled our five-year strategic plan, which outlined our vision for 2016-21. Since 2016, we have continually invested in research & advocacy to build momentum around our vision of equipping young people from vulnerable backgrounds with life skills. The journey so far has been very exciting, and we believe we are on the right path. With this report we would like to share some key highlights from FY 2018-19 as we move closer to our 2021 vision.

 

AFTER SCHOOL LIFE SKILLS PROGRAMME

 In our After School Life Skills Programme, we use creative arts and football as mediums to engage and develop critical life skills among young people between the ages of 8 to 15 years. This programme is an innovation lab where new approaches to life skills development are introduced, demonstrated, documented, evaluated, and fed back into a larger framework for re-imagining learning for young people in the country. To measure the improvements in life skills amongst the young people, we use the Life Skills Assessment Scale (LSAS*).

Impact of our After-School Life Skills Programme: 

  • Overall enrolment in the programme for the FY2018-19 was 5,658 students.
  • Total of 3,275 students opted for Creative Arts and 2,383 opted for Football.
  • The programme achieved a healthy balance in terms of gender participation where 48.63% participants were female.
  • The average attendance rate was 89% and the average retention rate was 94%.
  • 96.8% of the tracked participants were more focused and willing to complete studies and achieve their Dream goals. 
  • 96.9 % of the participants had an end line score above norms and thus improved their skills to deal with challenges.
  • 96% of the participants have seen a positive change after 2 years of reengagement. 

 

As always “Thank you for your generous contribution and giving our young people #aChanceToThrive!”

Young People participated in Community Cup
Young People participated in Community Cup
Young people celebrating YOU at Career Connect
Young people celebrating YOU at Career Connect
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Dream A Dream

Location: Bangalore, Karnataka - India
Website:
Project Leader:
Vishal Talreja
Cofounder & CEO
Bangalore, Karnataka India
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