Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan

by Fatima Memorial Hospital
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan

Even though Pakistan has recorded significant improvements in overall school participation, it still faces severe challenges in providing quality and adequate education to eligible children. They include inadequate and uneven access to schools, low quality of public education services, and insufficient and inefficient fiscal outlay to the education sector. Further investment and reforms are needed to widen access and increase enrollment and completion at primary and secondary education.

The major obstacles in the education system of Pakistan are low enrollment ratio, poverty-driven out-of-school children, higher dropout ratios, and some of the teaching quality issues in most of the rural areas of Pakistan. The national literacy rate in 1981 was 25.73 percent and is currently reported 62.3 percent. Therefore, a comprehensive strategy is of dire need to strengthen the education system of Pakistan

The social return to education means that society gets to progress, understanding civic roles, rational decision making, making responsible citizens, learning norms, social and religious harmony, a decrease of crime rates, and public knowledge to expose the power of ballot for creating democratic societies. It is well evident that political decision-making became prosperous in educated societies and states across the globe since the dawn of human civilization.

More investment in education is likely to create knowledge creation in multiple fields of science and technologies, innovation, and providing technical and vocational skills to the youth bulge that may spill over into higher productivity in almost all the fields of national life of Pakistan. Different economists and researchers have used various parameters and indicators to measure multiple aspects of such returns to education. The most common is the years of schooling, experience after schooling, the levels of vocational skills, technical capabilities, innovation and creativity indicators, quality of education, and the level of schooling, to mention a few. Quantifying indirect returns to education is a challenge to measure yet faced by social scientists. Similarly, the payoff matrix of education varies across individuals and fields of sciences and labour market responses across the globe.

The studies conducted in the past in this regard, have indicated parameters to bring fluctuations in returns are class size, teacher quality, school quality, student-teacher-parents collaboration mechanism, classroom attendance, teacher attendance, and the resources allocated for education purposes. All these parameters are the constituting components of any education policy.

NUR Foundation and Fatima Memorial Hospital continues to provide education to the underprivileged communities (without any discrimination of age/gender/caste/religion, etc.) through their chain of formal and informal schools in underdeveloped and neglected areas of Lahore. Every year, approximately 2,500 students pass out from our schools. The current students enrolled in NCOP Schools located in Malikpur/Talwara, Lakhudair, Nainsukh, and Gajjumatta total 2,000.

These children need uniforms, books, and other education support materials. Moreover, the schools need heaters, and other accessories through which these children are able to study.

Your donations not only go towards the education but also the infrastructure needed to ensure these children have proper environment for education.

There is a long way to go and that is only possible when you keep providing us with assistance. Your donations can make a big difference.

Thank you.

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Starting with education in Pakistan, the country’s public expenditure on education is just over 2% of GDP, which is less than half the average of 4.7% in other emerging markets. This spend seems low but before the 18th Amendment, when education was devolved as a provincial subject, spend used to average between 1.7-1.8% of GDP. Additionally, if you take private expenditure on education in Pakistan into account, spend would actually be in line with emerging market averages.

 

According to I-SAPS, parents privately spent PKR 829 billion on education in Pakistan, with half (PKR 398 billion) going to private schools and the rest to the “shadow sector” which includes tuition centers. While the state is constitutionally ‘responsible for eradication of illiteracy and provision of free and compulsory education up to secondary level’, over 40% of students in Pakistan study in private schools. Limited provision of quality education has led to parents spending almost as much as the state itself on education (2% of GDP). Similar to the case of housing, where inadequate provision by the state has led to Pakistanis allocating an outsized amount of their consumption on housing, private education also adds to high consumption levels in Pakistan. If this 2% of GDP is directed towards domestic savings instead, it could help reduce the investment deficit in the country.

 

Pakistan had an adult literacy rate of 57%, which is lower than Sri Lanka’s 92% and India’s 69%. Another metric tracked earlier by UNDP was the proportion of secondary educated population, where Pakistan also lagged behind other regional peers. While 57% of Pakistanis above 15 years of age can read and write, only 37% of those above 25 years of age have some secondary school (12 or 13 years of education). The new metric used in the Human Development Indicators is mean years of schooling, which indicates how many years on average, a citizen has completed in education. The latest numbers suggest that the average Pakistani has completed 5.2 years of schooling as compared to Bangladesh’s 6.1 years, India’s 6.5 years, Iran’s 10 years, and Sri Lanka’s 11.1 years. Across most metrics, you will notice education in Pakistan lagging behind other countries.

NUR Foundation and Fatima Memorial Hospital have been providing education to the underprivileged communities (without any discrimination of age/gender/caste/religion, etc.) through their chain of formal and informal schools in underdeveloped and neglected areas of Lahore. Every year, approximately 2,000 students pass out from our schools. The current students enrolled in NCOP Schools located in Malikpur/Talwara, Lakhudair, Nainsukh, and Gajjumatta total 1476.

 

These children need uniforms, books, and other education support materials. Moreover, the schools need heaters, and other accessories through which these children are able to study.

Now that the COVID cases of having dropped and schools are back to normal functioning, We have to support these kids who are coming back. Therefore, we require more support from our donors.

The weather is getting cooler and these children need properly closed spaces to study. We need support for our infrastructure as well.

There is a long way to go and that is only possible when you keep providing us with assistance. Your donations can make a big difference.

Thank you.

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Education being the fundamental human right, stands most important element in evolution of human progress and nation development. It develops capabilities to fight against injustice, violence, corruption and many other social evils. Sustainable socioeconomic development of a country depends on substantial investment in its human capital through education and skill development. Educated people work as an effective tool in accepting and adopting innovative ideas and means of productivity/technologies, ensuring the elimination of economic and social ailments. Further, as a dividend, it brings socio-economic progress as well as prosperity in the country. An educated and skilled nation is productive enough to accelerate economic growth through expanded vision, creativity and, innovations in the country.

According to the Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement (PSLM) district level Survey 2019-20, the literacy rate of population (10 years and above) is stagnant at 60 percent in 2019-20 since 2014-15. The literacy rate is higher in urban areas (74 percent) than in rural areas (52 percent). Province wise analysis suggests that Punjab has the highest literacy rate, with 64 percent followed by Sindh with 58 percent, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Excluding Merged Areas) with 55 percent, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Including Merged Areas) with 53 percent and Balochistan with 46 percent

The provincial governments have prioritized areas of interventions in education sector such as provision of missing facilities, improvement of the physical infrastructure, establishment of IT/Science labs, up-gradation of girls and boys primary schools to middle, high and secondary levels, construction of new boys and girls schools and colleges, provision of scholarship through endowment funds and other scholarship schemes. Early Childhood Education (ECE) at Primary level and strengthening of Provincial Institutes of Teacher Education (PITE) and other areas of interventions. Education Foundations have been provided sufficient resources by the provinces. The development budget has also been allocated for capacity building of teachers to provide quality education and for the establishment of the cadet colleges to meet the prerequisites of education. However, this is still not enough, leaving behind a large number of children unable to access education.

NUR Foundation has been providing education to the underprivileged communities (without any discrimination of age/gender/caste/religion, etc.) through its chain of formal and informal schools in underdeveloped and neglected areas of Lahore. Every year, approximately 1800 students pass out from our schools. The current students enrolled in NCOP Schools located in Malikpur/Talwara, Lakhudair, Nainsukh and Gajjumatta total 1476.

In addition to this, NUR Foundation has also started the initiative of Adult Literacy Program in which 30 adult females are currently enrolled. The objective of this program is to provide the basic level of education to adult women who have never been to a school before.

We still have to keep in mind the impact of COVID19 on our projects and the education system in Pakistan especially in rural areas. Such areas require more attention and support. Since we also have to move towards digital reliance for educating these poor children, our schools required IT equipment for which we require your continued support.

Our donors are the biggest support we have and because of your support we have reached this far. There is a long way to go and that is only possible when you keep providing us with assistance. We look forward to generous donations from all our valued donors.

Thank you.

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Pakistan’s literacy rate 57 percent lags well behind its neighboring countries. The primary school dropout rate is 22.7 percent (3rd highest in the region after Bangladesh and Nepal), which is alarming given it as at the stage of formative learning (Economic Survey of Pakistan, 2019-20).The United Nations Global Education Monitoring Report 2016, concluded that Pakistan is 50 years in primary education while 60 years behind in secondary education to achieve the education goals. The number of children at primary, secondary and upper secondary level still from out of school were 5.6, 5.5, 10.4 million respectively. This is an alarming and mind boggling situation for the whole nation. Why this happened? Let us try to find out the answer of the question.

 

The last academic year was a very difficult one for education. Schools were closed in March 2020 and remained shut till September or so. They were again closed in December and then once more about a month ago. Even when open, schools have had to work under strict SOPs. They were asked to have 50 per cent attendance and alternate day classes and to work under other restrictions. Currently with COVID19 cases surging, the schools have been shut down again making it extremely challenging for us to provide education. Private schools have switched to online classes since they have the resources to do so. Whereas in our case, it has become extremely difficult for us to provide education to the poor. However, we are still trying to bring in online system as well as hold classes in open air maintaining social distancing while providing education.

The Covid-19 pandemic is expected to impact us for a long time. Millions of children have no access to school and for our already fragile education system this is indeed an unprecedented situation in the history of education. However, we must embrace this unexpected change and apply an alternate approach to ensure continuity in education.

This shocking statistic and the poor state of Education in Pakistan since the very beginning is the very reason that Fatima Memorial Hospital took the initiative of commencing the NUR Community Outreach Program (NCOP) in the year 1985. The objective of NCOP is to act as a catalyst of change in order to bring about socio-economic development of the underprivileged communities, via an integrated approach to education, healthcare and economic empowerment.

NUR Foundation has been providing education to the underprivileged communities (without any discrimination of age/gender/caste/religion, etc) through its chain of formal and informal schools in underdeveloped and neglected areas of Lahore. Every year, approximately 1800 students pass out from our schools. The current students enrolled in NCOP Schools located in Malikpur/Talwara, Lakhudair, Nainsukh and Gajjumatta total 1476.

In addition to this, NUR Foundation has also started the initiative of Adult Literacy Program in which 30 adult females are currently enrolled. The objective of this program is to provide the basic level of education to adult women who have never been to a school before.

With current Pandemic (COVID19) around, we have more challenges to address. The Rural Areas need more help and assistance, so that our teachers can educate the people about the disease and also keep educating the children on individual basis with all precautions. We are trying our level best to provide education to the deserving children of the community but due to COVID19, it has become increasingly challenging. Keeping in view the current situation, we need your support in order to arrange online sessions for the students, provide them with books, uniforms, as well as platforms through which their education doesn’t suffers.

Your generous support is of immense value to us so we urge you to continue the donation and support us.

Thank you

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Studies conducted in Pakistan conclude that the average rate of return to another year of schooling is 5 to 7 percent. The constitution of Pakistan allows free and compulsory education for the children of ages (5-16) years. After the 18th constitutional amendment (2010) education has become a provincial subject, but federal government has always played an imperative role in this regard.

The overall literacy rate was 18% while male and female literacy rate was 19%, 12% respectively in 1951 in Pakistan. It augmented to 60%, 71%, and 49% respectively in 2018-19.Pakistan is ranked 152 out of 189 countries in the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Human Development Index (HDI) ranking. The Human Development Report 2019 stated that Pakistan has not exhibited improvement in key educational indicators, such as literacy rate, gross enrolment ratio, and expenditure on education, as compared to regional countries.

Pakistan’s literacy rate 57 percent lags well behind its neighboring countries. The primary school dropout rate is 22.7 percent (3rd highest in the region after Bangladesh and Nepal), which is alarming given it as at the stage of formative learning (Economic Survey of Pakistan, 2019-20).The United Nations Global Education Monitoring Report 2016, concluded that Pakistan is 50 years in primary education while 60 years behind in secondary education to achieve the education goals. The number of children at primary, secondary and upper secondary level still from out of school were 5.6, 5.5, 10.4 million respectively. This is an alarming and mind boggling situation for the whole nation. Why this happened? Let us try to find out the answer of the question.

The root cause of the problem started from colonialismUnder the policy of divide and rule, they divided education among rich and poor. They dismantled the traditional education system and introduced an English education system. It had no link with the domestic education system and had its own foreign curriculum and exams. Educational institutions that followed this system were established in the region. The purpose of those institutions was to educate elite class only. Unfortunately, the educated elite class from those institutions indulged in a false complex and considered themselves a superior class.

The non-elite education system (Urdu Medium) was only for masses. It had plethora of impediments. It was geared towards preparing a working class from the middle, lower middle and the poor class. They spent their whole life struggling for a living, and accepted it as fate from generation to generation. Unfortunately, that class never became the part of the elite education system during or after the colonial rule. But the demonstration effect of the elite education system created a panic among the masses with the passage of time.

So in the name of English Medium, there was a mushrooming of local private schools in rural and urban areas. The local English medium schools attracted the middle class. But they could not help the poor class to catch up due to their poor economic condition. They started more or less ten education policies for the betterment of non elite education system that did not fully achieve their goals. So education became a dream for the poor class.  

The post-COVID impact due to the prolong closure of school will have a massive impact on Pakistan’s already fragile education system, such as learning gaps, and social/emotional/mental well-being. This could also lead to no promotion next year, ultimately leading to a halt in continuity of education.

The Covid-19 pandemic is expected to impact us for a long time. Millions of children have no access to school and for our already fragile education system this is indeed an unprecedented situation in the history of education. However, we must embrace this unexpected change and apply an alternate approach to ensure continuity in education.

This shocking statistic and the poor state of Education in Pakistan since the very beginning is the very reason that Fatima Memorial Hospital took the initiative of commencing the NUR Community Outreach Program (NCOP) in the year 1985. The objective of NCOP is to act as a catalyst of change in order to bring about socio-economic development of the underprivileged communities, via an integrated approach to education, healthcare and economic empowerment.

NUR Foundation has been providing education to the underprivileged communities (without any discrimination of age/gender/caste/religion, etc) through its chain of formal and informal schools in underdeveloped and neglected areas of Lahore. Every year, approximately 1800 students pass out from our schools. The current students enrolled in NCOP Schools located in Malikpur/Talwara, Lakhudair, Nainsukh and Gajjumatta total 1476.

In addition to this, NUR Foundation has also started the initiative of Adult Literacy Program in which 30 adult females are currently enrolled. The objective of this program is to provide the basic level of education to adult women who have never been to a school before.

With current Pandemic (COVID19) around, we have more challenges to address. The Rural Areas need more help and assistance, so that our teachers can educate the people about the disease and also keep educating the children on individual basis with all precautions.

Your generous support is of immense value to us so we urge you to continue the donation and support us.

 

Thank you

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Organization Information

Fatima Memorial Hospital

Location: Lahore, Punjab - Pakistan
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @nur_crp
Project Leader:
Arif Kabani
Lahore, Punjab Pakistan
$64,352 raised of $75,000 goal
 
702 donations
$10,648 to go
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