Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan

by Fatima Memorial Hospital
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan
Continuing Malala's Dream - Educating Pakistan

Education being the fundamental human right, stands most important element in evolution of human progress and nation development. It develops capabilities to fight against injustice, violence, corruption and many other social evils. Sustainable socioeconomic development of a country depends on substantial investment in its human capital through education and skill development. Educated people work as an effective tool in accepting and adopting innovative ideas and means of productivity/technologies, ensuring the elimination of economic and social ailments. Further, as a dividend, it brings socio-economic progress as well as prosperity in the country. An educated and skilled nation is productive enough to accelerate economic growth through expanded vision, creativity and, innovations in the country.

According to the Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement (PSLM) district level Survey 2019-20, the literacy rate of population (10 years and above) is stagnant at 60 percent in 2019-20 since 2014-15. The literacy rate is higher in urban areas (74 percent) than in rural areas (52 percent). Province wise analysis suggests that Punjab has the highest literacy rate, with 64 percent followed by Sindh with 58 percent, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Excluding Merged Areas) with 55 percent, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Including Merged Areas) with 53 percent and Balochistan with 46 percent

The provincial governments have prioritized areas of interventions in education sector such as provision of missing facilities, improvement of the physical infrastructure, establishment of IT/Science labs, up-gradation of girls and boys primary schools to middle, high and secondary levels, construction of new boys and girls schools and colleges, provision of scholarship through endowment funds and other scholarship schemes. Early Childhood Education (ECE) at Primary level and strengthening of Provincial Institutes of Teacher Education (PITE) and other areas of interventions. Education Foundations have been provided sufficient resources by the provinces. The development budget has also been allocated for capacity building of teachers to provide quality education and for the establishment of the cadet colleges to meet the prerequisites of education. However, this is still not enough, leaving behind a large number of children unable to access education.

NUR Foundation has been providing education to the underprivileged communities (without any discrimination of age/gender/caste/religion, etc.) through its chain of formal and informal schools in underdeveloped and neglected areas of Lahore. Every year, approximately 1800 students pass out from our schools. The current students enrolled in NCOP Schools located in Malikpur/Talwara, Lakhudair, Nainsukh and Gajjumatta total 1476.

In addition to this, NUR Foundation has also started the initiative of Adult Literacy Program in which 30 adult females are currently enrolled. The objective of this program is to provide the basic level of education to adult women who have never been to a school before.

We still have to keep in mind the impact of COVID19 on our projects and the education system in Pakistan especially in rural areas. Such areas require more attention and support. Since we also have to move towards digital reliance for educating these poor children, our schools required IT equipment for which we require your continued support.

Our donors are the biggest support we have and because of your support we have reached this far. There is a long way to go and that is only possible when you keep providing us with assistance. We look forward to generous donations from all our valued donors.

Thank you.

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Pakistan’s literacy rate 57 percent lags well behind its neighboring countries. The primary school dropout rate is 22.7 percent (3rd highest in the region after Bangladesh and Nepal), which is alarming given it as at the stage of formative learning (Economic Survey of Pakistan, 2019-20).The United Nations Global Education Monitoring Report 2016, concluded that Pakistan is 50 years in primary education while 60 years behind in secondary education to achieve the education goals. The number of children at primary, secondary and upper secondary level still from out of school were 5.6, 5.5, 10.4 million respectively. This is an alarming and mind boggling situation for the whole nation. Why this happened? Let us try to find out the answer of the question.

 

The last academic year was a very difficult one for education. Schools were closed in March 2020 and remained shut till September or so. They were again closed in December and then once more about a month ago. Even when open, schools have had to work under strict SOPs. They were asked to have 50 per cent attendance and alternate day classes and to work under other restrictions. Currently with COVID19 cases surging, the schools have been shut down again making it extremely challenging for us to provide education. Private schools have switched to online classes since they have the resources to do so. Whereas in our case, it has become extremely difficult for us to provide education to the poor. However, we are still trying to bring in online system as well as hold classes in open air maintaining social distancing while providing education.

The Covid-19 pandemic is expected to impact us for a long time. Millions of children have no access to school and for our already fragile education system this is indeed an unprecedented situation in the history of education. However, we must embrace this unexpected change and apply an alternate approach to ensure continuity in education.

This shocking statistic and the poor state of Education in Pakistan since the very beginning is the very reason that Fatima Memorial Hospital took the initiative of commencing the NUR Community Outreach Program (NCOP) in the year 1985. The objective of NCOP is to act as a catalyst of change in order to bring about socio-economic development of the underprivileged communities, via an integrated approach to education, healthcare and economic empowerment.

NUR Foundation has been providing education to the underprivileged communities (without any discrimination of age/gender/caste/religion, etc) through its chain of formal and informal schools in underdeveloped and neglected areas of Lahore. Every year, approximately 1800 students pass out from our schools. The current students enrolled in NCOP Schools located in Malikpur/Talwara, Lakhudair, Nainsukh and Gajjumatta total 1476.

In addition to this, NUR Foundation has also started the initiative of Adult Literacy Program in which 30 adult females are currently enrolled. The objective of this program is to provide the basic level of education to adult women who have never been to a school before.

With current Pandemic (COVID19) around, we have more challenges to address. The Rural Areas need more help and assistance, so that our teachers can educate the people about the disease and also keep educating the children on individual basis with all precautions. We are trying our level best to provide education to the deserving children of the community but due to COVID19, it has become increasingly challenging. Keeping in view the current situation, we need your support in order to arrange online sessions for the students, provide them with books, uniforms, as well as platforms through which their education doesn’t suffers.

Your generous support is of immense value to us so we urge you to continue the donation and support us.

Thank you

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Studies conducted in Pakistan conclude that the average rate of return to another year of schooling is 5 to 7 percent. The constitution of Pakistan allows free and compulsory education for the children of ages (5-16) years. After the 18th constitutional amendment (2010) education has become a provincial subject, but federal government has always played an imperative role in this regard.

The overall literacy rate was 18% while male and female literacy rate was 19%, 12% respectively in 1951 in Pakistan. It augmented to 60%, 71%, and 49% respectively in 2018-19.Pakistan is ranked 152 out of 189 countries in the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Human Development Index (HDI) ranking. The Human Development Report 2019 stated that Pakistan has not exhibited improvement in key educational indicators, such as literacy rate, gross enrolment ratio, and expenditure on education, as compared to regional countries.

Pakistan’s literacy rate 57 percent lags well behind its neighboring countries. The primary school dropout rate is 22.7 percent (3rd highest in the region after Bangladesh and Nepal), which is alarming given it as at the stage of formative learning (Economic Survey of Pakistan, 2019-20).The United Nations Global Education Monitoring Report 2016, concluded that Pakistan is 50 years in primary education while 60 years behind in secondary education to achieve the education goals. The number of children at primary, secondary and upper secondary level still from out of school were 5.6, 5.5, 10.4 million respectively. This is an alarming and mind boggling situation for the whole nation. Why this happened? Let us try to find out the answer of the question.

The root cause of the problem started from colonialismUnder the policy of divide and rule, they divided education among rich and poor. They dismantled the traditional education system and introduced an English education system. It had no link with the domestic education system and had its own foreign curriculum and exams. Educational institutions that followed this system were established in the region. The purpose of those institutions was to educate elite class only. Unfortunately, the educated elite class from those institutions indulged in a false complex and considered themselves a superior class.

The non-elite education system (Urdu Medium) was only for masses. It had plethora of impediments. It was geared towards preparing a working class from the middle, lower middle and the poor class. They spent their whole life struggling for a living, and accepted it as fate from generation to generation. Unfortunately, that class never became the part of the elite education system during or after the colonial rule. But the demonstration effect of the elite education system created a panic among the masses with the passage of time.

So in the name of English Medium, there was a mushrooming of local private schools in rural and urban areas. The local English medium schools attracted the middle class. But they could not help the poor class to catch up due to their poor economic condition. They started more or less ten education policies for the betterment of non elite education system that did not fully achieve their goals. So education became a dream for the poor class.  

The post-COVID impact due to the prolong closure of school will have a massive impact on Pakistan’s already fragile education system, such as learning gaps, and social/emotional/mental well-being. This could also lead to no promotion next year, ultimately leading to a halt in continuity of education.

The Covid-19 pandemic is expected to impact us for a long time. Millions of children have no access to school and for our already fragile education system this is indeed an unprecedented situation in the history of education. However, we must embrace this unexpected change and apply an alternate approach to ensure continuity in education.

This shocking statistic and the poor state of Education in Pakistan since the very beginning is the very reason that Fatima Memorial Hospital took the initiative of commencing the NUR Community Outreach Program (NCOP) in the year 1985. The objective of NCOP is to act as a catalyst of change in order to bring about socio-economic development of the underprivileged communities, via an integrated approach to education, healthcare and economic empowerment.

NUR Foundation has been providing education to the underprivileged communities (without any discrimination of age/gender/caste/religion, etc) through its chain of formal and informal schools in underdeveloped and neglected areas of Lahore. Every year, approximately 1800 students pass out from our schools. The current students enrolled in NCOP Schools located in Malikpur/Talwara, Lakhudair, Nainsukh and Gajjumatta total 1476.

In addition to this, NUR Foundation has also started the initiative of Adult Literacy Program in which 30 adult females are currently enrolled. The objective of this program is to provide the basic level of education to adult women who have never been to a school before.

With current Pandemic (COVID19) around, we have more challenges to address. The Rural Areas need more help and assistance, so that our teachers can educate the people about the disease and also keep educating the children on individual basis with all precautions.

Your generous support is of immense value to us so we urge you to continue the donation and support us.

 

Thank you

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Education systems in Pakistan and around the world are working to respond to the unexpected outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic. Globally, 188 countries closed education institutions, leading to an estimated 1.60 billion students unable to attend schools. According to the Pakistan Bureau of Statistics, the education system of Pakistan encompasses over 317,000 schools with enrolment of almost 50.3 million students and over 1.83 million teachers. The system is further composed of almost 197,000 public schools and over 120,000 private schools. The public sector provides access to about 28.68 million students to complete their education while the remaining 21.60 million students are catered by the private sector of education.

 

During the current pandemic, over 50.0 million schoolgoing children have been unable to attend school for the past four months as the government continues to keep schools closed to ensure the health and safety of students and teachers. We already have over 22.5 million children that are out of school.

 

The post-COVID impact due to the prolong closure of school will have a massive impact on Pakistan’s already fragile education system, such as learning gaps, and social/emotional/mental well-being. This could also lead to no promotion next year, ultimately leading to a halt in continuity of education.

 

The Covid-19 pandemic is expected to impact us for a long time. Millions of children have no access to school and for our already fragile education system this is indeed an unprecedented situation in the history of education. However, we must embrace this unexpected change and apply an alternate approach to ensure continuity in education.

 

This shocking statistic and the poor state of Education in Pakistan since the very beginning is the very reason that Fatima Memorial Hospital took the initiative of commencing the NUR Community Outreach Program (NCOP) in the year 1985. The objective of NCOP is to act as a catalyst of change in order to bring about socio-economic development of the underprivileged communities, via an integrated approach to education, healthcare and economic empowerment.

 

NUR Foundation has been providing education to the underprivileged communities (without any discrimination of age/gender/caste/religion, etc) through its chain of formal and informal schools in underdeveloped and neglected areas of Lahore. Every year, approximately 1800 students pass out from our schools. The current students enrolled in NCOP Schools located in Malikpur/Talwara, Lakhudair, Nainsukh and Gajjumatta total 1476.

In addition to this, NUR Foundation has also started the initiative of Adult Literacy Program in which 30 adult females are currently enrolled. The objective of this program is to provide the basic level of education to adult women who have never been to a school before.

 

With current Pandemic (COVID19) around, we have more challenges to address. The Rural Areas need more help and assistance, so that our teachers can educate the people about the disease and also keep educating the children on individual basis with all precautions.

 

Your generous support is of immense value to us so we urge you to continue the donation and support us.

 

Thank you

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Education is the straightforward procedure of learning and knowing. It isn’t limited to the schools as it were. Training begins from the mother’s lap. Guardians and family instill great habits and make independent residents out of their kids. Home is called first school of the youngsters, however the proper training begins from the school, where they are instructed, how to act and comprehend what is happening around them.

 

The circumstance in Pakistan, in the same way as other developing nations, isn’t empowering. The low enlistment rates at the essential level, wide variations among locales and gender discrimination, absence of prepared instructors, lack of appropriate showing material and poor physical framework of schools demonstrates the lackluster showing of this area.

 

Literacy rate of Pakistan is almost around 50% where the essentials for being termed an educated person are that you able of reading and writing (34% approx.). Which is not a good sign, with a result that more than half of the literate ones are also not educated in a completely proper way? 

When we look at the scenario of physical infrastructure 18% primary schools have one classroom, 26% schools have one teacher 32% schools have no electricity, 22% have no toilets, 21% have no boundary walls 22% have no drinking water and 7% primary schools have no buildings. It indicates the non-seriousness by the government towards the education system.

 

This shocking statistic and the poor state of Education in Pakistan since the very beginning is the very reason that Fatima Memorial Hospital took the initiative of commencing the NUR Community Outreach Program (NCOP) in the year 1985. The objective of NCOP is to act as a catalyst of change in order to bring about socio-economic development of the underprivileged communities, via an integrated approach to education, healthcare and economic empowerment.

 

NUR Foundation has been providing education to the underprivileged communities (without any discrimination of age/gender/caste/religion, etc) through its chain of formal and informal schools in underdeveloped and neglected areas of Lahore. Every year, approximately 1800 students pass out from our schools. The current students enrolled in NCOP Schools located in Malikpur/Talwara, Lakhudair, Nainsukh and Gajjumatta total 1476.

In addition to this, NUR Foundation has also started the initiative of Adult Literacy Program in which 30 adult females are currently enrolled. The objective of this program is to provide the basic level of education to adult women who have never been to a school before.

The number of students wanting to be enrolled in our schools is rising day by day but the funds to accommodate them are limited. Also, in order to improve the quality of teaching and the overall quality of education, we require funds to train our teachers, construct a college building and develop proper facilities like computer labs and libraries. To provide such resources/facilities to our students, we rely on the generous donations of our esteemed donors.

Your donations are extremely important to us in these circumstances. With current Pandemic (COVID19) around, we have more challenges to address. The Rural Areas need more help and assistance, so that our teachers can educate the people about the disease and also keep educating the children on individual basis with all precautions.

We request you to keep supporting us with your generous donations.

Thank you

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Organization Information

Fatima Memorial Hospital

Location: Lahore, Punjab - Pakistan
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @nur_crp
Project Leader:
Arif Kabani
Lahore, Punjab Pakistan
$61,782 raised of $75,000 goal
 
665 donations
$13,218 to go
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