Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison

by Free Minds Book Club and Writing Workshop
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Book Club for Youth in Federal Prison
Jordan, member of the Covid Writers Collective
Jordan, member of the Covid Writers Collective

This spring, Free Minds members have continued to demonstrate their resilience, courage, and creativity in the face of continued use of solitary confinement due to the pandemic. With your support, we’ve kept up a steady stream of communication with our members behind the prison walls, including books, poetry feedback, letters from volunteers, our Free Minds Connect magazine, and other resources and words of hope from our Free Minds Poet Ambassadors.

Thank you for joining hands with Free Minds as we endured one of the most change-inducing years. Your continuous help is greatly appreciated!

Books Across the Miles

Due to your gracious support, the Prison Book Club is equipped with the resources necessary to mail every member books, ranging from Kindred by Octavia Butler to Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning. Members have voted on the current “Book Across the Miles” (BAM) book, George Pelecanos’s The Man Who Came Uptown, a novel addressing the “redemptive power of books” told through the eyes of Michael Hudson, a fictional character who wrestles with staying on the right path after being released from prison. Free Minds even received a special mention in this novel! The book club is an intrinsic part in helping our members keep their minds free, as reading provides mental and emotional liberation from the confines of prison. With each BAM book, members also receive discussion questions that ask about plot, characters, and messages of the novel to help engage members’ writing. Discussion questions give members the opportunity to freely express their opinions on a subject, a human need that is often denounced within the prison system.

Free Minds member Terrence wrote in, “I read it in 3 days and it really took me back down memory lane. Once upon a time, I could closely relate to Michael’s character - coming home and not wanting to fall again, but unfortunately being blown into negativity and feeling trapped. I wish I could return to the life of Michael and see where I would have gone. A lot of emotions with this book.”

As they say, “a book is a gift you can open again and again.” Your generosity is a gift to Free Minds!

 

The Connect: Behind the Scenes 

Through powerful testimonies, eye-opening poetry, and weeks of collaboration, the Connect—Free Minds’ literary magazine—connects staff, Poet Ambassadors, and currently incarcerated members to the wider community. The creation of one issue of the Connect involves intensive teamwork between the Free Minds editorial team, staff, volunteers, and both incarcerated and reentry members. The Connect allows members to foster their passion for reading and writing by engaging in fruitful conversations through poems and essays exploring a wide range of subjects. Additionally, this magazine provides Free Minds members a safe space to share their voices, their stories, and most importantly, to be seen.

Like all publications, there are several steps that lead to a final product. First, the Free Minds staff and Poet Ambassadors have an editorial meeting to discuss the new theme, assign articles, and ideas for the cover art. Our currently incarcerated members are involved at every step of the way, providing ideas and feedback along with their submissions. Over a period of 1-2 months, members mail us poems, essays, or articles to be used in the next issue of the Connect. One example is the popular advice column where a member responds and offers sound solutions to pressing questions. The submissions from staff and members are compiled, edited, and then laid out by a graphic designer before going to print. Over 50 people are involved in this process!

The latest issue of the Connect is on the theme Renewal. Free Minds member Meechie recently wrote in to express his appreciation for the Connect: "I love reading the Free Minds Connect. It just makes my day every time I see my name on the mail list because even though it's the only mail I ever receive, it's the best mail to receive. It keeps my mind free with every issue. It's like stumbling upon a ton of water in a desert and my mind is always thirsty for knowledge and new inspirations. So thank you all and keep them coming."

 

Write Week 

On the Same Page: Write Night is a virtual celebration of our members’ poetry; together, hundreds of volunteers, as well as Free Minds staff and Poet Ambassadors, write heartfelt comments on the poetry from members incarcerated in prisons across the country. Each comment, each drawing, helps members feel closer to home, and is a precious reminder that they are not alone. For volunteers, Write Night is a rare and valuable opportunity to hear directly from people caught in the prison system, and to connect with them literally “on the same page.” Due to the generous support from volunteers, our members’ voices are soaring to new heights and their poetry is being read by those nationally and internationally. In April, in order to meet the high demand, we decided to extend Write Night to an entire week to reach volunteers in different times zones. All week, volunteers all over the world could log on and read and respond to our members’ poetry. Every second a volunteer spends writing a comment touches a member’s heart for a lifetime. The community’s selflessness provides all 900 Free Minds members the space to unearth their voices, in a system designed to bury them.

 

Covid Writers Collective 

Free Minds Poet Ambassadors—formerly incarcerated members who are dedicated to giving back to the community—former the Covid Writers Collective, a collaborative effort to provide resources and support for our incarcerated book club members who have endured more than a year of solitary confinement due to the pandemic. The Covid Writers Collective sends monthly activity kits with news, words of encouragement, brain teasers, writing prompts, and other resources. Each Covid Writers Collective’s kit has a theme, ranging from inauguration day to Civil Rights history. The Covid Writers Collective is a lifeline of information and support for incarcerated Free Minds members.

Free Minds member Jordan expressed his joy in being a part of the Covid Writers Collective: “I experienced how it felt to not be supported at an early age before meeting Free Minds, and especially considering that we share the same experiences and story, it’s only fitting to give back and support others now that we are in a position and have a platform to do so. The pandemic has also mentally drained a lot of people, and just being able to brighten someone else’s day has become a huge part of my daily routine.”

Knowledge is power, and Free Minds Poet Ambassadors have honored that truth with the Covid Writers Collective! 

Thank you for being part of our broader collective, and for making all of this powerful community building possible.

 

Jameon, member of the Covid Writers Collective
Jameon, member of the Covid Writers Collective
The Man Who Came Uptown by George Pelecanos
The Man Who Came Uptown by George Pelecanos
Cover art for the Free Minds Connect magazine
Cover art for the Free Minds Connect magazine

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FM member Victor shared the impact of voting
FM member Victor shared the impact of voting

Following in the footsteps of leaders who have walked before us, Free Minds members continue to be beacons of peace, passion, and positivity through their poetry. With the spirit of Martin Luther King Jr. in mind, Free Minds members reached new audiences through their writing. On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we facilitated five “On the Same Page” events, sharing Free Minds poetry with hundreds of people in a unique literary exchange. We were honored to be included in the Presidential Inaugural Committee’s National Day of Service as well. Your gracious support has helped Free Minds bridge gaps and give back, encouraging members to write new chapters in their lives, one page at a time. 

Bridging Communities

We worked with local and national organizations to amplify the voices of our members. We partnered with The National Book Foundation for the third annual acclaimed “Literature for Justice” program, a nationwide, book-based campaign that seeks to contextualize and humanize the experiences of incarcerated people in the United States. The program is guided by the Literature for Justice committee, a cohort of well-known authors who are also experts, leaders, and advocates within the space of mass incarceration (Literature for Justice - National Book Foundation).

In preparation for a panel discussion with the Literature for Justice committee and authors of the selected titles, Free Minds distributed the selected books to our incarcerated members in the DC Jail and in federal prisons all over the country: City of Inmates: Conquest, Rebellion, and the Rise of Human Caging in Los Angeles, 1771-1965, Ossuaries, Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California, Solitary: Unbroken by Four Decades in Solitary Confinement and Assata: an Autobiography. Free Minds members participated in an Assata book club, and submitted thoughts and poetry to be shared at the event. Free Minds member Vance wrote, “I think the book was fantastic! Assata was a very strong and purposeful woman and I really admire her more now after reading her autobiography. I can relate to portions of the things she encountered as a youth out there on her own.”

We continue to be a resource of timely information for our members to support them through rapidly changing situations, such as sending voter registration information after DC passed a historic voting rights bill allowing incarcerated people to vote, and sending up-to-date information about how to access the federal CARES Act stimulus payments if you are incarcerated.

Members shared their “attitudes of gratitude” with us:

“You have recently made me aware that we DC inmates can now vote. WOW! I was so elated by the news and immediately sent for applications. I want to make a change, difference, and show that not only Black Lives Matter, but Black Votes Matter!” - Free Minds member Gene

“Your efforts have been amazing throughout this time and I really appreciate it. I have shared with so many people what your organization does for us and I have felt privileged to be a part of it. The book choices are amazing and the newsletters are so informative.” - Free Minds member Yusef

“I appreciate the entire Free Minds Book Club because as a member I truly feel like part of a family and have come to understand that love, kindness, and respect can be found even amongst people you haven't personally met." - Free Minds member Darnell

Connect: Purpose

We welcomed the new year by identifying and celebrating the purpose each one of us holds in our community. In our latest issue of the Connect, Free Minds staff, members, and friends came together as witnesses to the power, strength, and meaning our community creates in sharing and fulfilling our purpose together.

In the Purpose issue of the Connect, you will find a story of hope and success as FM member Marcos recounts his journey to the United States and the gift of second chances (page 34). On page 6, Free Minds friend Maji reflects on how the lasting legacy of Congressman John Lewis led him to find purpose through writing. On page 16, Free Minds friend Jeffrey writes about pursuing his purpose of becoming a licensed therapist for youth, despite the obstacles he faces being blind. On page 27, read an interview with FM member Marius, home after 25 years behind bars, about finding purpose in both his time while incarcerated and in his next steps at home. 

Books Across the Miles: Never Caught

Our latest Books Across the Miles title (selected by votes from members) was Never Caught by Erica Armstrong Dunbar. It’s the true story of Ona Judge, an enslaved woman of George and Martha Washington who risked everything to escape and reach freedom. Members wrote in sharing their thoughts on the legacy of George Washington, the importance of one’s name, and Ona’s inspiring resilience: 

“At first, I really did not know too much about George Washington...I was shocked that he actually had a plantation.” - MC

“Ona’s name tells the world who you are and where you are from and what you are part of. A good name is truly worth more than gold. A full name for our ancestors marked them as free women and men: Human beings, whole and free, braveheart and true, liberated to move in life with the rest of humanity.” - AW

“I just finished reading Never Caught. It was such an inspiring book. I related to Ona in how she was subjected to a certain way of life that would be for the duration of her life, yet she fought, persevered, hoped, and began to turn her dream of freedom into a reality.” - MV

From voting to serving, Free Minds members will continue checking “firsts” off of their lists. 

Their prose and poetry are compelling testaments to hardships we not only experience, but overcome, together as a community. Your support is an invaluable part of the Free Minds community. Thank you! 

Art of Congressman John Lewis by FM member Ed
Art of Congressman John Lewis by FM member Ed
Cover art for the Free Minds Connect magazine
Cover art for the Free Minds Connect magazine
FM member Steve shares wisdom he learned from 2020
FM member Steve shares wisdom he learned from 2020

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Latest issue of the Free Minds Connect
Latest issue of the Free Minds Connect

While federal facilities remain on a nation-wide lockdown due to COVID-19, our Prison Book Club members continue to use poetry as a healing tool and a clarion call to the world. Their poetry relays both the anxieties of confinement during a global pandemic as well as the strength and resilience that radiates from our members in the face of the unknown. The passion and determination that shines through in their poetry has impacted readers near and far as our community continues to grow, thanks in large part to your generous support. 

Write Night Goes Live and Global

Our monthly Virtual Write Night, an opportunity for volunteers to share encouraging responses to members’ poetry, keeps getting better and bigger! In June, we began broadcasting a live segment where volunteers could hear from Poet Ambassadors and take part in a Q&A. Over 300 viewers tuned in to our July Write Night, listening to Poet Ambassador Gordon’s story, Congressman Lewis Fellow Shannon’s dedication to the late Congressman John Lewis, and special guest speaker Clint Smith (Book Club Facilitator and renowned author of Counting Descent) on the value of providing feedback to incarcerated poets. 

Virtual volunteer opportunities have created the space to amplify the voices and poetry of members on a global level. In August, we created a challenge to see how far across the world we could spread members’ poetry. Their voices reached an international audience, spreading to 28 states and 10 countries!

Members never fail to send their “attitudes of gratitudes” after receiving books, postcards, and/or bi-weekly packets with meditations, writing prompts, brain teasers, and puzzles:

"I loved the Free Minds DC crossword puzzle, that joint took me all the way out there. It put the biggest smile of the year on my face. I wanna thank you guys for being there at such a crazy moment. It's been a lot going on but you know we are resilient. Our minds are too strong to let go." - Free Minds member Sadiq

"My brain is a womb and you guys, my Free Minds family, are my doulas. Helping to give a natural birth to my thoughts, ideas, and writing ability. Free Minds has given me a forum to express my thoughts of positivity and hope for a better future for all of us." - Free Minds member Deontae

“These lockdowns have a brother feeling very isolated...you all have been coming through and helping me feel better. ” - Free Minds member Joseph

Connect: Music

Over the years, one of the most popular tips members have shared for dealing with daily stressors is something that mirrors a universal practice: the healing power of music. In our latest issue of the Connect, Free Minds staff, members, and friends come together to share the role of music in their lives. 

This issue’s vibrant cover was created by volunteer SF in response to a poem she read by member MH. In its pages you will find:

  • Reentry Manager Keela explains the scientific explanation behind the therapeutic nature of music (p.13)
  • FM member Ontae shares how he uses his calling as a gospel rapper to heal and uplift the community (p. 27)
  • Witness how music is used as a tool for social change with the mbira, a Zimbabwean instrument symbolizing resistance against colonialism (p. 6)
  • Recently home after 25 years, FM member David talks about his mentoring role as a Credible Messenger with the DC Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services (p. 36)
  • Travel through time with FM friend Sloane as she explores the use of music in social movements over the past several decades (p. 16)

Books Across the Miles: Kindred

The latest Book Across the Miles vote strayed a bit from our usual genres, but for good reason because members loved it! Kindred by Octavia Butler follows Dana, a young African American woman, who suddenly finds herself involuntarily time traveling between 1970’s California and the pre-Civil War Maryland plantation where her ancestors lived. We have received overwhelmingly positive and thoughtful responses from members grappling with the novel’s messages of race and power:

“I don’t believe any person of African slave descent who ever experiences the extreme depths of physical, psychological, and spiritual degradation that was imposed upon our ancestors during the barbaric institution of slavery can ever be whole again. It’s like Octavia said, to endure that life and survive as Dana did you have to lose a part of who you once were to become who you are now. That’s the price.” - QS

“In one scene on the plantation, a characters says, ‘Why are they still complaining about slavery [a century later]?’ This stood out to me because it is still relevant and you still hear it now. The road has been long and there are still many problems going on.” - MH

“Dana could never really heal after experiencing slavery. We all must look directly at what really happened and recognize that this whole country has a missing part of its body because of what once happened.” - AC

As members continue to share their insight and wisdom through their letters and poetry, we are reminded of the power in supporting each other and strengthening our community. You are a key part of that community. Thank you for your continued support!

Card from Free Minds member Alazajuan
Card from Free Minds member Alazajuan
Art by Free Minds member Philip
Art by Free Minds member Philip
Art by Free Minds member Francisco
Art by Free Minds member Francisco

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"Ladder of Hope" by FM Member SK
"Ladder of Hope" by FM Member SK

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on the members of our Prison Book Club, but thanks to you, we have been there with unwavering support. In response to the public health crisis, all federal prison facilities are currently on lockdown, meaning our members who are already hundreds of miles from home, are now locked in their cells for 22-24 hours per day, with only brief windows of time each week to call their loved ones, exercise, or even take a shower. Members have been writing to us with messages of fear and worry over their forced isolation in environments that already lack access to proper health and sanitary conditions. We are stepping up our services to help our members cope with this stress and trauma, and continue to access educational materials. We cannot thank you enough for supporting us during this crisis. Your generosity reminds us that times of uncertainty are times when we must all come together as a community!

We knew we needed to act quickly to ensure uninterrupted support for our members. We immediately moved our volunteer work online and knew our dedicated corps of volunteers would respond. They did not disappoint. We have been thrilled with the response from our community! Volunteers are writing letters to our members in our weekly Letter Writers Circle via Zoom, typing poems written by our members, and creating “lockdown” worksheets with puzzles, brain teasers, and writing prompts to help keep their minds active and free during quarantine. Our monthly Write Night has also gone virtual and attracted hundreds of new volunteers from across the globe! This is a special opportunity where volunteers provide feedback on poetry from our members, which is then mailed to our members in over 100 federal prisons across the country. The public is keenly aware of what incarcerated individuals are enduring in the coronavirus hotspot that is prison, and traffic has been enormous on our poetry blog where the community can post encouraging comments on our members’ poetry.

Thanks to your support, our community has been a ray of hope for our members! The appreciation from our members has been pouring in. What we call “attitudes of gratitude” letters have been nonstop.

“Thanks so much for everything: the books, the letters, the birthday cards, and most of all the feeling of family and support. I really thank you guys because just when it felt like I had nobody and I felt like giving up, you guys came through and let me know someone's there and they care. Thank you guys." - Free Minds member Demitrich

“Free Minds is a special program and helps a lot of us in here. Knowing somebody is willing to support me is something big for me. You can turn a negative to a positive. I'll show FMBC how bright I can get. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to share my thoughts." - Free Minds member Joshua

"I wanted to say thank all of you for everything that you do for all of us. See I learned wealth isn't all about money, it's about time. And we constantly forget that. You guys put so, so, so much time in us, you actually believe in us. You've helped change me to the man I am today, and writer I am today. I want each and every one of yall to hug each other and just drop a tear because teamwork makes the dream work." - Free Minds member Taurus

Connect: Remembrance 

As we entered into Spring, a time of new life, our members suggested we dedicate an issue of our newsletter to all our loved ones who we have lost, but who are living on in our hearts. In our latest issue of the Connect, Free Minds members, staff, and friends reflect on different pathways of remembrance and ways of celebrating the lives of our dear ones. The timing between the vibrant colors of Spring and our latest issue was also perfect, as we debuted our new redesign complete in full color.

In this vibrant and touching celebration of life and remembrance, stories include:

  • FM friend and therapist Edward’s guidance on how we can come to terms with our own grief and different ways we can honor loved ones who have died (p.6)
  • A touching tribute to Joshua, FM Congressman John Lewis Fellow who passed away last September, written by FM member Arthur (p. 23)
  • How FM member Luis, who was deported after his release, has adjusted to his new life and remembers his real home, D.C. (p.9)
  • Co-founder and Executive Director Tara's nephew, Jeffrey, shares how he overcame the obstacles of being blind in order to obtain his master's degree and become a youth counselor (p. 20)

Books Across the Miles: Man’s Search for Meaning

The latest Books Across the Miles book voted on by our members has been a huge hit! Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning is the real-life story of survival and finding purpose. A survivor of a Nazi concentration camp, Frankl believed that we cannot escape suffering but we can decide how we cope and use that suffering to find and pursue our meaning in life. Our members have found Frankl’s memoir both relatable and encouraging, inspiring them to reflect on their own meaning in life. Here is what some members had to say:

“I just started reading Man’s Search for Meaning. It is really powerful and taught me a lot about life. I can’t put it down for anything, I really do love this book.” - RC

“I think Frankl’s experience in concentration camps could be compared to incarceration in the United States. Although Frankl had a harsher experience, it is similar in ways. Concentration camps, prisons, and the likes could cause a mental death to the incarcerated. The cruel and unusual punishment that is endured could lead to mental health issues - anxiety, depression, stress, etc. It is different today because prison has better food and living conditions. We are not forced to work under inhumane circumstances. There are life sentences but we know our fate - they didn’t know theirs.” - SM

“For me, the meaning of life is to be a good person and a good human being. This can be interpreted in many ways but for me it is about leaving something better than you found it. Whether that something is a relationship, place, situation, or person.” - JL

“One step is for us as a people is to open our eyes and realize, not look, but realize that meaning is there for everyone.” - LA

Do you have your own thoughts about Man’s Search for Meaning and want to read more about what members had to say? You can follow along with the discussion in the Connect!

Thank you for sustaining our community of support during these times. Like our community is to our members, so you are a ray of hope to us!

The new design for the Free Minds Connect
The new design for the Free Minds Connect
Artwork by FM member RW
Artwork by FM member RW
Letters from FM members in prison
Letters from FM members in prison

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The latest issue of our Connect newsletter
The latest issue of our Connect newsletter

As we begin a new decade, Free Minds is eager to continue our commitment to  the transformative power of reading and writing for youth and young adults who have been incarcerated. Our Prison Book Club fosters community and creates bonds among our members, who are hundreds of miles away from home, and elevates their voices through books and poetry. Thank you for your support and your part in sustaining this community of encouragement and hope.

Connect: Forgiveness

In our latest issue of the Connect, members share their journey with forgiveness and what it means to not only forgive others, but also to forgive oneself. The stories of forgiveness found in this issue are inspirational reminders of the capacity for human compassion and transformation. 

  • How new member of the FM family, Reentry Coordinator Melody, came to forgive the man who killed her husband (p.7)
  • FM member, Craig, shares how the father of the person he killed forgave him and eventually testified in support of his resentencing and early release (p.10)
  • The emotional encounter FM member, BB, experienced when he met face-to-face with the victim of his crime (p.20)
  • Ubuntu Philadelphia Co-founder, Ghani, shares how his organization utilizes different experiences and perspectives of injustice to redefine justice and healing as a community (p.22)
  • Vicarious restorative justice as an alternative method for emotional healing to all parties impacted by the criminal justice system (p.6)

Our members love to show their “attitudes of gratitude”. We receive letters thanking us for everything from birthday cards to our encouragement for members to discover the outlets that reading and writing possess. Thanks to your generosity we are able to send a strong message of support to our members. Here are some excerpts:

“Here you all go again with another big birthday banger! Yes, I just got you all's birthday card today and it couldn't have come at a better, needful, and greater time. So thanks, you just made me that much happier! You got me hearing a new song, I'm holding on to 2 balloons and rising up above this mess! You got me feeling like a superstar! Thanks to all of the Free Minds Family, especially for all of those reinforcing encouraging words on my birthday cards.” - Free Minds member Derrick

“Thank you dearly for all that you do! You all are a God-send to me. Without you all, prison would be so boring. I wouldn’t be happy, I wouldn’t have started writing poems again and I wouldn’t have started writing books.” - Free Minds member Daniel

Books Across the Miles: Man’s Search for Meaning

We asked and our members answered! The next Books Across the Miles selection is Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning. A survivor of the Holocaust, Frankl chronicles his experience in a Nazi concentration camp and how he managed to discover his purpose in life and use this as a tool of survival. Frankl encourages the reader to mentally escape the confines of their current situation and develop the hope that a positive future is attainable. It offers the message of developing resilience and perseverance in the face of an unimaginable situation.

Members have also written in with thoughtful reflections from the previous Books Across the Miles choice, Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds. In this work of fiction, teenager Will experiences the cycle of gun violence while trying to seek revenge for the death of his brother. Here is what some members had to say: 

“Long Way Down was a first for me. I never read a book composed of poems that vividly told a story like that before. It was a good book that I plan on sending to my son that is 11 years old. The ending was different and great. It left room for the reader to place themselves in the elevator and gave them the choice to stay on or get off. Not many books can pull the reader in to that level.” - TJ

"I think Reynold's use of poetry is to get the reader to look at his words as a work of art. He gets you to look at Will's situation with the eyes of someone looking at a picture. This is why I think it impacts the reader in a way normal sentences wouldn't. For instance it doesn't read like a novel, it reads like a series of poems that turn into a story." - DS

“There were “rules” in my neighborhood [like Will’s]. If you didn’t follow them, the ole heads would step in and make sure you knew you were outta line. To me not having a father, I looked up to a lot of the ole heads. It was the only option. The ole heads set the rules because they been there, done that, they set the foundation. Changing the rules to the hood is to try to get the youth to understand that it’s not cool to do certain things.” - MZ

“Crying is a sign of weakness in the hood and the weak are taken advantage of. I think not crying has an impact on not just the community but individuals as a whole who have no way to express emotions like hurt, anger, pain and happiness. A baby cries because it can’t talk and tell you what’s bothering it. Crying is a form of release.” - DS

Have you read Man’s Search for Meaning or Long Way Down? You can find discussion questions in our newsletter, The Connect, and follow along with what our members are discussing about each book.  

Again, thank you for supporting Free Minds and listening to and elevating the voices of our members. We appreciate you!

The next Books Across the Miles selection
The next Books Across the Miles selection
A drawing shared by FM member AE
A drawing shared by FM member AE
A letter from FM member DJ
A letter from FM member DJ
Holiday cards from FM members in prison
Holiday cards from FM members in prison

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Free Minds Book Club and Writing Workshop

Location: Washington, DC - USA
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Twitter: @FreeMindsDC
Project Leader:
Tara Libert
Washington, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA United States
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