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Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women

by Aid Afghanistan for Education
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Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
Grow Peace in Afghanistan: Educate 3000 Women
The outbreak of COVID-19 severally affected education in Afghanistan. At the outset of the outbreak, schools were closed, and 8.7 million children couldn't attend school. AAE's schools closed as well.
The Ministry of Education instructed students to continue their education from home by attending the education programs through radio and televisions. However, this solution isn't affordable to most of families, especially the internally displaced people and returned refugees, a key population that we work with at AAE.  
To contribute to the continuous education during the outbreak, AAE initiated the distribution of learning materials to highly marginalized children. In the first phase, AAE mapped the IDPs and returnees camps in Kabul, and through close coordination with the Kabul Education Directorate, distributed educational materials to 300 children. 
Tracking the result of the initiative, the target beneficiaries identified the learning materials useful to their continuous education. Hanifa, a third-grade student, said, "When the schools closed, I was advised by the school management to stay at home. My family couldn't afford the costs of the self-learning materials. So, I had to continue learning without the needed materials. When I received the learning materials from AAE, since then, I am effectively learning, and I can read and write by myself."
In the next phases, AAE will expand the distribution of learning materials to highly marginalized students.
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The AAE hopes you and your family are doing well during this difficult time. Schools across Afghanistan are closed because of the COVID-19 virus, including AAE's schools. We're hopeful for a quick resolution to this crisis so we can return to class. 

In the meantime, one of our students, Khatera, asked to share her story with you. Here it is.

"In 1995, due to the civil war, my family was forced to migrate from Kabul to Quetta, Pakistan. The shift had considerable impacts on me and my family. I was working along with my father as a carpet weaver to pay for the very basic needs of our family.  During the eight years of residency in Pakistan, I couldn't make a way to get an education. "


"In 2003, I came back to Afghanistan and settled in Kabul.  My family permitted me to get an education. As a 14-year-old old girl, I wasn't allowed to get admission in public school, because of my age. The only option was to attend literacy classes." 


"The literacy classes were only up to third grade.  After graduation from literacy classes, I was desperate to pursue my education.  I made several attempts to get admission to public school, but each time failed because of my age."

  
"After several months of searching, I found Aid Afghanistan for Education schools, which had no age restriction for students. I got admitted in fourth grade. The school program was suitable for my age and needs. The 12 years schooling period compressed into 7 years and 8 months.  The learning process sufficiently contributed to my development.  During my school years, I acquired good knowledge and skills.  I made some good, life time, friends, who are quite effective in my life." 


"After graduation, I passed the Kanker Exam (annual entrance exam to Kabul university) and got admitted in social studies in my favorite university.  After graduation from university, I followed my dream of becoming a teacher.  I was recruited by a private school, where I am teaching social subjects." 

"Now, I am teaching to hundreds of girls and women and helping them to be capable personalities.  Meanwhile, I am contributing to my family by paying the school costs of my two sisters." 

"I am proud of myself and seeing myself a capable person, by having the capacity to contribute to myself and others. Indeed, this achievement would be never possible, unless I had the chance to study at AAE school."

We are so proud of Khatrera and students like her who rise above their cirumstances to achieve their dreams. Thank you for contuing your support of Aid Afghanistan for Education, and take care. 

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Razia
Razia

Meet Razia, an Afghan returnee from Iran.  

When returned refugees or internally displaced people like Razia come back to Afghanistan after time away, they are required to present sufficient documents and should be at a specific age to be admitted to traditional public school. Otherwise, they can attend literacy classes (aimed to provide basic reading and writing skills, which only reach grade three level) or night school. 

After returning from Iran, Razia’s family resided in Kabul.  She finally convinced her family to permit her to get an education.  After getting her family's permission, she started her search to find a school she could attend. She said, “I submitted applications to several public schools, but each time my application was rejected, and I was told to get admission in literacy classes or night school. Both of the options were rejected by my family.”

Razia's family's rejection of these two options is not uncommon. Families typically don't allow female students to study at night, which involves travel to the center of the city at night, which is not considered appropriate. Many families also expect women and girls to spend the evenings cooking, cleaning, and taking care of children. Literacy classes, on the other hand, offer the bare minimum reading and writing skills, which aren't considered "enough" to leverage for higher income or to enter university. These such classes don't offer any sort of degree or certificate, so many families don't believe it's worth the effort.

While searching to find a school to fulfill her dream, Razia finally gained admission to Aid Afghanistan for Education's (AAE) school No.2 in Kabul. In this regard, she said, “I nearly lost hope, but suddenly one morning a miracle happened. A neighbor told me there is a school that allows you to get admission. I was amazed and surprised, and got the admission.”

Razia continued her studies in AAE’s school. She said, “The school environment was professional and best suited to my age. When I saw students of my age, I was always motivated and realized that there is no age restriction to get an education".  

This year, Razia turned 28 years old and earned her high school diploma. She wants to be an active voice for Afghan women and girls by becoming a journalist.  She will begin studying journalism this summer at one of the prestigious universities in Kabul.  

Stories like Razia’s inspire me to continue working toward an Afghan society where every person, no matter their age, gender, refugee status, or otherwise, can access the education of their dreams and create a more peaceful country.

Thank you for all of your support for AAE, and have a very joyful holiday season and a happy new year! We hope that 2020 brings you peace, light, and joy.

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I'm so excited to introduce three of Aid Afghanistan for Education's star students to you. They are all Kochi nomads who now live in Kabul. Traditionally, Kochi people in Afghanistan have been very marginalized and have not had access to crucial services like education. Especially with recurring droughts in rural areas of Afghanistan, many Kochi people have experienced difficult lives, and some are choosing to live in cities like Kabul.

Malalay and Farida, sisters, joined AAE's school when they were 15 and 16 years old. When they graduated recently, Malalay was ranked second in her class and Farida was ranked sixth. While they wanted to pursue political careers in parliament, their families are conservative so they are not planning to go to university at this time. When asked about the importance of their education, they said, "We are very happy and proud because no one is literate or has a high school degree in our family. So when the electricity bill comes, they bring it to us to read it."

Spozhmai, another recent graduate from a Kochi family, said, "I am the only one in our tribe with a high school diploma, and the only one who is pursuing a career. I am studying to be a midwife."

Malalay, Farida, and Spozhmai are all the first women in their families, and some of the first from their tribes, to earn a high school diploma. It's because of support from you that AAE is able to serve such marginalized communities in Afghanistan, and we're very grateful for our support. While I wish we could share photos of these three celebrating their achievements, they have asked us to respect their privacy and safety by not posting photos. 

Thank you, as always, for your steadfast support of accelerated education for marginalized Afghan women. 

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It's that time of year again! Aid Afghanistan for Education and our community in Kabul just celebrated graduation for 130 students. I've added some of our favorite photos from the ceremony, but you can view all photos on Facebook.

During the ceremony, we were privileged to hear from a member of Kabul's Ministry of Education, member of parliament Shinkai Karokhail, and even a graduate's brother. All three of them spoke to the importance of educating women, especially mothers, and how AAE's programs are serving women who are otherwise excluded from formal education. You can view a short video of the ceremony speeches here (in Dari).

We're proud to say that these students will be promoting peace in Afghanistan, no matter how they choose to spend their next few years. Some will go to university, others will study to become teachers or midwives, and many will ensure their children study, learn, and grow safely. Together, we will make Afghanistan more peaceful, one graduate at a time. 

Thank you for all you've done to support AAE's students and quest for peace in Afghanistan. We're so grateful to have you by our side.

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Organization Information

Aid Afghanistan for Education

Location: Kabul - Afghanistan
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @aidafgedu
Project Leader:
Hassina Sherjan
Kabul, Afghanistan
$310,619 raised of $375,000 goal
 
2,501 donations
$64,381 to go
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