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Oct 24, 2014

Rainforest restored on two more Daintree blocks

land prepared for planting
land prepared for planting

Restoring rainforests to its former glory takes time, heavy lifting and lots of back-bending but the end result is rewarding and incredibly fulfilling said our Daintree Land Manager, Joe Reichl.

In early 2012, gifts from donors enabled us to secure another two special rainforest properties. We were very keen to purchase lots 82 and 83 Rosewood Road Cow Bay as they had council building approval rights and posed the risk of more dwellings being built.

We already owned six properties in this area, so these two additional ones enabled us to extend the Baralba Corridor Nature Refuge - a valuable wildlife corridor that links the Daintree National Park and the World Heritage area.

Flora and fauna surveys verified their high conservation value. The presence of rare plants with limited distribution (like the Rhaphidophora hayi vine), significant sized buttress trees, and limited clearing (at the time we estimated 80% undisturbed rainforest), further increased our desire to protect this rainforest forever.

Once we had secured their purchase, restoring the 20% of disturbed forest did provide some interesting challenges and work for Joe and his team - work that they have just now completed.

For the last two and a half years our team toiled in the heat and the wet to bring the rainforest back.

Joe describes it as it was like someone took a cookie-cutter and removed a chunk of pristine rainforest from each of the properties. These chunks were meant to be house blocks (neither of which were ever built) instead a massive stockpile of debris and sheds accumulated and these were eventually overgrown with weeds that were knee-high and covered the old infrastructure.

Our purchases ensured these precious rainforest was not cleared and the properties are now protected forever with no chance of potential development.

There is no rest for Joe and his team of volunteers and part-time staff they are now back at other properties donors have helped us saved forever - weeding and watering trees they have planted in the last two years and removing younger oil palms.

The purchase and restoration of these two properties would not have been possible without the support of our donors thank you very much. Your support in adopting rainforest helps Protect Rainforest Forever.

We now have our sights set on another two pieces of land to buy and restore and with your support we will save them!

What we have achieved together:

  • 40 tonnes of debris was removed - including sheds, cement, tyres, caravans, water tanks and water tower
  • 4,975m2 of land weeded - Singapore daisy was knee deep
  • 1.4 hectares of land was planted with rainforest seedlings grown in our nursery
  • Weed clearing also enabled the natural regeneration of an additional 30 square metres
  • 1,764 trees planted
  • Equivalent of 31 days taken to remove debris, weeds and oil palms
  • Two more pieces of land restored to their natural rainforest
volunteers planting trees you have adopted
volunteers planting trees you have adopted
weeds, weeds, weeds - it was a jungle of bramble
weeds, weeds, weeds - it was a jungle of bramble
tyres recycled into children's softfall playground
tyres recycled into children's softfall playground
five Oil Palms that covered nearly one hectare
five Oil Palms that covered nearly one hectare
what we saved by protecting this land
what we saved by protecting this land
many old cars left to rot in the rainforest
many old cars left to rot in the rainforest
Sep 29, 2014

Wongaling Wetland Cassowary Corridor restoration

Before weeds are removed
Before weeds are removed

Locals couldn’t remember the last time Wongaling Creek flowed, but in collaboration with Girringun Aboriginal Corporation, we’ve completed the Wongaling Wetland Cassowary Corridor restoration project and the creek is now flowing again!

The Djiru Native Title Land at Mission Beach was choked with water weeds, guinea grass, lantana and Singapore daisy, and surrounded by urbanisation and development. The land was prioritised for restoration after it was identified as key cassowary habitat by the Traditional Owners.

The project also employed and trained Djiru Traditional Owners, many of whom had been displaced by Mission Beach’s rapid development and soaring property prices.

“The Girringun nursery and restoration team and the Djiru restoration team thank you for your support to help heal our country,” said Nina Dawson, Restoration Project Coordinator.

 

What we've achieved together:

  • Removal of invasive Singapore daisy that had clogged the creek and prevented native species growth
  • 1,500 Cassowary rainforest trees planted
  • Seed collection of cassowary food trees to be grown in the Girringun nursery
  • Training of Djiru people – plant identification, seed collection and restoration and propagation techniques
  • Wongaling Creek flowing again
Site 1 after weed removal
Site 1 after weed removal
Dijiru and Girringun crew
Dijiru and Girringun crew
Jul 22, 2014

Measuring large-scale rainforest restoration

Monitoring growth
Monitoring growth

Canopy cover, number of species, plant density and rate of growth are all key indicators of forest development.

At Lot 46 Cape Tribulation Road in the Daintree area of far north Queensland, Rainforest Rescue is monitoring all those factors and more to measure the success of a large scale rainforest restoration project.

This Cassowary Conservation Reserve is one of 24 properties that Rainforest Rescue has now adopted and protected forever in the Daintree Lowlands Rainforest.

Cassowary Conservation Reserve

The property was partly cleared in the 1960s, first for cattle grazing and later for Oil Palm cultivation. More recently it had become a dumping ground for rubbish, cars, caravans, boats, and a haven for impenetrable weeds.

In 2012 we secured funding which set the property on its long journey back to rainforest. Monitoring is based on periodic measurement of growth rates of both planted and ‘volunteer or wildling’ trees in areas left for natural regeneration. The property was divided into working zones and seven 50 x 20m monitoring plots were laid out in the different zones.

In addition, twelve permanent photographic points were set up within the working zones and plots to allow consistent recording of rainforest re-development and growth over time.

Results to date have been extremely positive, showing remarkable growth rates and rapid canopy closure – the key to rainforest structure. The monitoring will continue until we reach a point where this restored rainforest rules! By the looks of things, we don’t have long to wait for this to happen…

We will continue to restore this rainforest and others we have purchased thanks to generous donations. Thank you.

Canopy cover, number of species, plant density, and rate of growth are key indicators of forest development.

At Lot 46 Cape Tribulation Road in the Daintree area of far north Queensland, Rainforest Rescue is monitoring all those factors and more to measure the success of a large scale rainforest restoration project.

- See more at: http://www.rainforestrescue.org.au/blog/#sthash.Oz0pd7o4.dpuf

By Madeleine Faught, Chair Rainforest RescueCassowary Conservation ReserveCanopy cover, number of species, plant density, and rate of growth are key indicators of forest development.

At Lot 46 Cape Tribulation Road in the Daintree area of far north Queensland, Rainforest Rescue is monitoring all those factors and more to measure the success of a large scale rainforest restoration project.

- See more at: http://www.rainforestrescue.org.au/blog/#sthash.Oz0pd7o4.dpuf

 
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