Youth Journalism International

Youth Journalism International connects teen writers, artists and photographers with peers around the globe, teaches journalism, fosters cross-cultural understanding, and promotes and defends a free youth press.
Dec 2, 2016

A tough time for journalists, young and old

A group of YJI students in Edinburgh recently.
A group of YJI students in Edinburgh recently.

This is a difficult time for journalists old and young. It’s an especially challenging moment for Youth Journalism International in its quest to empower young writers and photographers to stand up for the principles and values of a profession that’s under fire. They notice when leaders call journalists “scum” and smear individual reporters for doing their job. They see that far too many of the people they respect and love are ready to believe quacks who make up news stories rather than accept the truth that professional journalists work hard to uncover. They know that they’re eyeing a career in a field that is struggling everywhere.

And yet there is still something noble about the mission “to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable” that has driven the best journalists for generations. That idealism can still move people. And the work it produces can still make a difference. So we soldier on, teaching and empowering young people in scores of countries to develop their skills and tell their stories. They learn in the process that their voice matters, that every person, everywhere, has something to say that’s worthwhile. As one of our students, a young woman in Pakistan, put it, “YJI made me realize that I am not made for nothing. Today I know that I AM something.”

We appreciate your willingness to help Youth Journalism International with its crucial work.

Dec 2, 2016

A tough time for journalists, young and old

A group of YJI students in Edinburgh recently.
A group of YJI students in Edinburgh recently.

This is a difficult time for journalists old and young. It’s an especially challenging moment for Youth Journalism International in its quest to empower young writers and photographers to stand up for the principles and values of a profession that’s under fire. They notice when leaders call journalists “scum” and smear individual reporters for doing their job. They see that far too many of the people they respect and love are ready to believe quacks who make up news stories rather than accept the truth that professional journalists work hard to uncover. They know that they’re eyeing a career in a field that is struggling everywhere.

And yet there is still something noble about the mission “to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable” that has driven the best journalists for generations. That idealism can still move people. And the work it produces can still make a difference. So we soldier on, teaching and empowering young people in scores of countries to develop their skills and tell their stories. They learn in the process that their voice matters, that every person, everywhere, has something to say that’s worthwhile. As one of our students, a young woman in Pakistan, put it, “YJI made me realize that I am not made for nothing. Today I know that I AM something.”

We appreciate your willingness to help Youth Journalism International with its crucial work.

Sep 2, 2016

Go to a Donald Trump rally with a YJI student

Backing Donald Trump
Backing Donald Trump

Youth Journalism International students have been covering presidential campaigns for two decades. But there's never been one quite like this year's version.

Last winter, one of our students in Iowa, Garret Reich, managed to catch appearances by a host of candidates: Donald TrumpBen CarsonBernie SandersTed Cruz and Hillary Clinton. She probably deserves a medal for her efforts.

A Connecticut teen, Max Turgeon, has written a couple of opinion pieces weighing in on the race from a Republican perspective. His most recent says that Trump is in trouble, but still deserves GOP support

But perhaps the most dramatic is a first-person essay that Ruth Onyirimba wrote in August after going to a Trump rally with the intention of protesting the Republican nominee. You can read her piece here or, in a first for YJI, you can listen to her read it here.

There are many, many other stories that have nothing to do with the election, of course. YJI students span the globe, writing about an astonishing range of issues, taking pictures and providing a glimpse into the world that young people are going to create. Thank you for helping to make it all possible.

Protesting at a Trump rally
Protesting at a Trump rally
Two YJI students interview editor Marty Baron
Two YJI students interview editor Marty Baron

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