Jan 20, 2017

Girls saving Girls, Part 1

Samjhana supporting girls at the local school
Samjhana supporting girls at the local school

One of the most amazing results of our STOP Girl Trafficking (SGT) project is Dr. Aruna’s Uprety's army of SGT graduates! Young women once at risk of being trafficked are now role models. And they’re helping other girls, not only in the classroom, but empowering them to stand up to pressures that would take them out of school—because education is their best hope to change their fate. This is Samjhana's story, in her own words (translated from Nepali).

 

Namaste! My name is Samjhana Lamichhane from Sindhupalchowk. I am working as a support teacher at Sri Bhumeshori Higher Secondary School. My success story is as follows:

Pushpa was born in Sindhupalchowk and is the third eldest of five sisters. Her dad was an alcoholic and used to beat up all his children. Later her dad passed away in bed from overconsumption of alcohol. What Pushpa's mother earned was not enough to feed the family. That is why her eldest sister never made it to school and cannot even write her name. She was made to work at home, and at fifteen they got her married. At that time our society did not know much about child marriage; even I did not know that it was wrong and could not stop Pushpa's sister from getting married.

When Pushpa got to grade 6, school became too expensive. One of her neighbors took her to Kathmandu, promising to put her back in school. But after three months he told her he had brought her to work as a domestic helper, began beating her and stopped her from going to school. After a while, she escaped saying that she is going to visit her mother. Back home, she said that she wanted to study, but her mother told her she could not afford to send her school. Then Pushpa came to me crying and said she wanted to get educated like me. She asked me to help her to go back to school. 

I later found out that SGT offers help to poor and Dalit students through grade 12 and an opportunity to go for higher studies. I applied for it and was accepted into the SGT program. After being selected, I told the teachers about Pushpa, who was in a greater need. I told them about Pushpa's situation and that she had missed school for the last three months. Then they met Pushpa and got her back in school. Now Pushpa is studying in grade 10. Pushpa says that SGT has saved her from child labor and child marriage. Pushpa is very grateful for the opportunity. Thank you.

Nov 14, 2016

Reaching Out-HRDC in the field

Physical therapy administrated in the field
Physical therapy administrated in the field

2016 has been a big year for the Hospital and Rehabilitation Center for Disabled Children, more commonly known as HRDC.  Between January and June nearly 13,000 children were treated by the doctors and medical staff at both field sites and the main hospital in Banepa, about 25 kilometers east of Kathmandu. Over 8,000 of these patients were seen at one of 23 mobile camps that visit hard to reach places of Nepal to provide desperately needed health care. The majority of the Nepal’s nearly 29 million residents live in rural, isolated locations, with little to no access to health care centers.  HRDC is working on changing that.

Satellite clinics bring the hospital to the patients. These mobile health clinics bring materials and knowledge to villages and people that otherwise have no access a hospital. HRDC reports that early diagnosis is the first step to a longer and healthier life. Field workers can take measurements for prostheses which are made at HRDC’s workshop and delivered directly to the patient—saving them a trip and lost wages.  While much can be treated in the field, HRDC also provides transport for patients whose condition requires them to be treated at the main hospital.

The doctors at HRDC are passionate about opening doors for children with disabilities by changing the way care is delivered to the people of Nepal. 

Distribution of much needed medical supplies
Distribution of much needed medical supplies
The road is rough, but HRDC never gives up.
The road is rough, but HRDC never gives up.
Supporting children with disabilities everywhere
Supporting children with disabilities everywhere
Oct 26, 2016

Protecting Girls Through Education

Girls born into families at the margins of society already have the cards stacked against them – they are rarely sent to school, finding gainful employment is difficult at best, and expectations of marriage start at an extremely young age. Traffickers prey on the hopes of young, poor and uneducated girls, luring them with false promises into lives of slavery. STOP Girl Trafficking is using the power of education to combat traffickers’ lies and help give girls a real future.

The parts of Nepal that have high concentrations of trafficking are isolated, both economically and geographically. STOP Girl Trafficking is working with local partners to expand their existing networks into these cut off regions, and to communities who, in the past, have seen no other option for their daughters.

We have seen the first girls in the program grow up to become educated young women. Our commitment to them has created a new generation of mentors, community activists, teachers, and role models – all committed to helping other girls and stopping trafficking in Nepal. 

But our work is far from over. Every year girls find themselves in unimaginable situations and traffickers find new ways to exploit them – even posing as aid workers in the wake of the 2015 earthquakes. This year, STOP Girl Trafficking has 14,100 girls safe and in school, and with your help we will continue to see that number grow.

Education is power
Education is power
Keeping girls in school transforms communities
Keeping girls in school transforms communities
 
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