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May 29, 2020

Final Report on Typhoon Hagibis

Supporting people in need after Typhoon Hagibis.
Supporting people in need after Typhoon Hagibis.

Final Report on Typhoon Hagibis

As International Medical Corps’ emergency response to Typhoon Hagibis, which struck Japan in October of 2019, has ended, this update will be our final one.

To continue supporting International Medical Corps and our GlobalGiving projects, please visit our “Emergency Response to the Coronavirus (COVID-19)” project, where International Medical Corps is providing a global response to the pandemic.

Learn more about our Coronavirus response here: https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/emergency-response-to-the-coronavirus-2019-ncov/

The Importance of Support

In October 2019, Typhoon Hagibis made landfall on the Pacific coast of Japan, affecting nearly 25 million people and resulting in more than 67,000 acres of flooded areas. Hagibis was one of the worst storms Japan had seen in decades, affecting Shizuoka prefecture on up to Iwate prefecture. Nagano, Kanagawa, the Tokyo metropolitan area, Saitama, Chiba, Tochigi, Ibaragi, Fukushima and Miyagi were among the hardest hit.

To bring relief and recovery to the most vulnerable, International Medical Corps partnered with the Association for Aid and Relief Japan (AAR Japan) to work in Fukushima. We served people with disabilities through existing welfare centers, providing transportation, filling gaps in supplies, and helping individuals stay healthy in their homes. Our collaboration with three welfare centers in typhoon-impacted areas, supported some of the most vulnerable as they fulfilled day-to-day activities.

Izumi, a 49-year-old man who visits one of the welfare centers, recalls the damage Hagibis brought to his home, destroying nearly all of his belongings, including his clothing. He used his savings to repair his home, while our teams met his need for clothing. Izumi continues to visit one of the welfare centers in Fukushima, with staff reporting he is always coming up with ways to keep his life cheerful.

Izumi is one the many vulnerable people made even more so by the devastation left by Typhoon Hagibis, yet able to recover thanks to International Medical Corps and AAR Japan.

We thank the GlobalGiving community of donors for bringing awareness and support to International Medical Corps’ relief and recovery efforts around the world.

May 27, 2020

Our Global Response to COVID-19

First case emerges a survivor in South Sudan.
First case emerges a survivor in South Sudan.

COVID-19 continues to spread around the globe. According to the Johns Hopkins University dashboard, as of the end of May, there have been more than 5 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 and some 350,000 related deaths reported in 188 countries and regions.

To help bring this pandemic to an end as quickly as possible, International Medical Corps is supporting global healthcare worker safety in the countries where we provide services. We are leveraging our 35 years of experience and the knowledge of our epidemiologists from the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak, the 2003 SARS outbreaks, and infectious disease response efforts to ensure at-risk countries and regions are best able to respond to COVID-19 outbreaks.

As of May 5, our teams had screened 202,317 individuals for COVID-19 at our global missions and had distributed more than 2.6 million items of personal protective equipment (PPE) to supported health facilities. Additionally, we had trained over 8,000 frontline healthcare professionals on COVID-19 prevention and control measures and reached some 437,000 people with communications on how to reduce risk.

In the United States, International Medical Corps is coordinating with more than 20 hospitals to ensure that we are meeting the greatest needs in Los Angeles, New York City, Puerto Rico, Chicago and Detroit.

In New York City, in an interview with NPR on April 9, 2020, Susan Mangicaro RN, our COVID-19 Team Lead, stated that, “This is really unprecedented compared to anything I’ve ever seen. Our healthcare systems are overloaded and overburdened. The staff [are] struggling with being able to meet the needs of the patient. [We are] making choices we should never have to make.

You can listen to the rest of the interview here.

In Lebanon, thanks to the help of donors like the GlobalGiving community, International Medical Corps has provided some 80,200 PPE and IPC items, including gloves, waterproof overalls and soap, to healthcare centers in Lebanon, and provided training on infection prevention and control and the use of PPE to some 46 health workers so far.

Nafous, a Health Outreach Volunteer in Lebanon tells us that, “The COVID-19 trainings I attended with International Medical Corps were very useful and valuable. They included comprehensive information on safety guidelines and infection control precautions, which I didn’t know before.

The donated PPE and IPC items are helping Nafous perform her work safely: “The personal protective equipment supplied by International Medical Corps has encouraged me to conduct field visits to primary healthcare centers due to the feeling of safety they give me, which enables me to encourage beneficiaries to visit healthcare centers and seek health services.

For more information on our global response, please visit: https://internationalmedicalcorps.org/emergency-response/covid-19/


We thank the GlobalGiving community for continuing to support our global emergency response efforts to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Nafous, Health Outreach Volunteer in Lebanon.
Nafous, Health Outreach Volunteer in Lebanon.
Temporary medical shelter in Los Angeles.
Temporary medical shelter in Los Angeles.
May 26, 2020

Having Twins in the Upper Nile

The 26-year old mother with her twins.
The 26-year old mother with her twins.

South Sudan has one of the highest infant and maternal mortality rates in the world. One in every 50 live births results in the death of the mother; with the high fertility rate, this means that each mother has a one-in-seven chance of dying in childbirth in her lifetime.

In an effort to improve the health of women and children, International Medical Corps has constructed facilities to support mothers and their babies with, among other things, antenatal and postnatal care, assisted deliveries, family planning (including proper birth spacing) as well as emergency obstetric care.

In January 2020, a 26-year-old woman arrived at a small clinic operated by International Medical Corps outside of Malakal, which is the capital of Upper Nile state in South Sudan.

The woman was already in labor when she arrived and the first baby was delivered shortly thereafter. However, as the medical team examined her, they discovered that the woman was actually pregnant with heterozygous twins, a rare condition where there are two placentas instead of one. To safely deliver the second baby, the mother needed to have surgery, something that was not possible at this first clinic.

To reach the clinic that could safely perform the surgery, they needed to urgently find a boat to cross the swamp located between the two clinics. As there were no boats available, International Medical Corps’ staff had to carry the woman to the second, larger clinic to save the life of the mother and baby. The area where these two clinics are located is in an extremely remote area of South Sudan — one with no roads or other means of transportation.

Thankfully, our team reached the clinic in time and an emergency cesarean section was performed. This surgery saved both the baby’s and the mother’s lives. By this time, the woman had been in labor for several days.

We thank the GlobalGiving community of donors for continuing to support maternal and child health in South Sudan.

The swamp where the team carried the laboring mom.
The swamp where the team carried the laboring mom.
Another view of the swamp between the clinics.
Another view of the swamp between the clinics.
 
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