Apply to Join
May 27, 2020

Our Global Response to COVID-19

First case emerges a survivor in South Sudan.
First case emerges a survivor in South Sudan.

COVID-19 continues to spread around the globe. According to the Johns Hopkins University dashboard, as of the end of May, there have been more than 5 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 and some 350,000 related deaths reported in 188 countries and regions.

To help bring this pandemic to an end as quickly as possible, International Medical Corps is supporting global healthcare worker safety in the countries where we provide services. We are leveraging our 35 years of experience and the knowledge of our epidemiologists from the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak, the 2003 SARS outbreaks, and infectious disease response efforts to ensure at-risk countries and regions are best able to respond to COVID-19 outbreaks.

As of May 5, our teams had screened 202,317 individuals for COVID-19 at our global missions and had distributed more than 2.6 million items of personal protective equipment (PPE) to supported health facilities. Additionally, we had trained over 8,000 frontline healthcare professionals on COVID-19 prevention and control measures and reached some 437,000 people with communications on how to reduce risk.

In the United States, International Medical Corps is coordinating with more than 20 hospitals to ensure that we are meeting the greatest needs in Los Angeles, New York City, Puerto Rico, Chicago and Detroit.

In New York City, in an interview with NPR on April 9, 2020, Susan Mangicaro RN, our COVID-19 Team Lead, stated that, “This is really unprecedented compared to anything I’ve ever seen. Our healthcare systems are overloaded and overburdened. The staff [are] struggling with being able to meet the needs of the patient. [We are] making choices we should never have to make.

You can listen to the rest of the interview here.

In Lebanon, thanks to the help of donors like the GlobalGiving community, International Medical Corps has provided some 80,200 PPE and IPC items, including gloves, waterproof overalls and soap, to healthcare centers in Lebanon, and provided training on infection prevention and control and the use of PPE to some 46 health workers so far.

Nafous, a Health Outreach Volunteer in Lebanon tells us that, “The COVID-19 trainings I attended with International Medical Corps were very useful and valuable. They included comprehensive information on safety guidelines and infection control precautions, which I didn’t know before.

The donated PPE and IPC items are helping Nafous perform her work safely: “The personal protective equipment supplied by International Medical Corps has encouraged me to conduct field visits to primary healthcare centers due to the feeling of safety they give me, which enables me to encourage beneficiaries to visit healthcare centers and seek health services.

For more information on our global response, please visit: https://internationalmedicalcorps.org/emergency-response/covid-19/


We thank the GlobalGiving community for continuing to support our global emergency response efforts to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Nafous, Health Outreach Volunteer in Lebanon.
Nafous, Health Outreach Volunteer in Lebanon.
Temporary medical shelter in Los Angeles.
Temporary medical shelter in Los Angeles.
May 26, 2020

Having Twins in the Upper Nile

The 26-year old mother with her twins.
The 26-year old mother with her twins.

South Sudan has one of the highest infant and maternal mortality rates in the world. One in every 50 live births results in the death of the mother; with the high fertility rate, this means that each mother has a one-in-seven chance of dying in childbirth in her lifetime.

In an effort to improve the health of women and children, International Medical Corps has constructed facilities to support mothers and their babies with, among other things, antenatal and postnatal care, assisted deliveries, family planning (including proper birth spacing) as well as emergency obstetric care.

In January 2020, a 26-year-old woman arrived at a small clinic operated by International Medical Corps outside of Malakal, which is the capital of Upper Nile state in South Sudan.

The woman was already in labor when she arrived and the first baby was delivered shortly thereafter. However, as the medical team examined her, they discovered that the woman was actually pregnant with heterozygous twins, a rare condition where there are two placentas instead of one. To safely deliver the second baby, the mother needed to have surgery, something that was not possible at this first clinic.

To reach the clinic that could safely perform the surgery, they needed to urgently find a boat to cross the swamp located between the two clinics. As there were no boats available, International Medical Corps’ staff had to carry the woman to the second, larger clinic to save the life of the mother and baby. The area where these two clinics are located is in an extremely remote area of South Sudan — one with no roads or other means of transportation.

Thankfully, our team reached the clinic in time and an emergency cesarean section was performed. This surgery saved both the baby’s and the mother’s lives. By this time, the woman had been in labor for several days.

We thank the GlobalGiving community of donors for continuing to support maternal and child health in South Sudan.

The swamp where the team carried the laboring mom.
The swamp where the team carried the laboring mom.
Another view of the swamp between the clinics.
Another view of the swamp between the clinics.
May 8, 2020

Our Response to COVID-19: Puerto Rico

The medical shelter at Damas Hospital in Ponce.
The medical shelter at Damas Hospital in Ponce.

As a result of rapidly rising cases of COVID-19 in Puerto Rico, International Medical Corps has been collaborating with local hospitals to help them prepare for and respond effectively to COVID-19, integrated as far as possible into our response to the Puerto Rico earthquakes. As of May 5, 2020, COVID-19 has caused 1,843 confirmed infections and 54 related deaths in Puerto Rico according to the World Health Organization.

To help bring this pandemic to an end, International Medical Corps is supporting healthcare worker safety in the 30 countries where we provide services. We are leveraging our 35 years of experience and the knowledge of our epidemiologists from the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak, the 2003 SARS outbreaks, and infectious disease response efforts to ensure that at-risk countries and regions, like Puerto Rico, are best able to respond to COVID-19 outbreaks.

Globally, International Medical Corps is supporting relief efforts with the provision of supplies, screenings and case management, capacity building, mental health and psychosocial support, and the deployment of an Epidemic Response Team, as needed. For more details on our global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, visit: https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/emergency-response-to-the-coronavirus-2019-ncov/

In Puerto Rico, we are collaborating with the Department of Health, Damas Hospital in Ponce, Hospital Universitario de Dr. Ramon Ruiz Arnau (HURRA) in Bayamon, Hospital San Cristobal in Juana Diaz, and Interamericano de Medicina Avanzada (HIMA) Cupey in San Juan to help them prepare for and respond effectively to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Damas Hospital is a 330-bed teaching hospital in Ponce and Hospital San Cristobal is a public hospital located in Juana Díaz. The San Cristobal Health Network also includes three primary care clinics in nearby rural municipalities. Both Ponce and Juana Díaz are located on the southern coastal plain region — close to the epicenter of the series of earthquakes that damaged infrastructure, destroyed homes and reduced access to critical services in January 2020. We deployed four medical shelters to Damas Hospital and will supply additional shelters to San Cristobal next week to provide medical surge support that is integrated within our existing emergency response interventions for those affected by the earthquakes. Damas Hospital is using the temporary medical shelters to create an additional Emergency Department, and San Cristobal will do the same, with the inclusion of extra respiratory wards as well.

HURRA is a 306-bed hospital administered by the Department of Health and is affiliated with the University of Puerto Rico. HIMA-Cupey is a 70-bed hospital located in San Juan, the capital of Puerto Rico, which has the highest number of COVID-19 cases in the territory. The HIMA Health Network also extends into San Juan, Caguas, Fayardo and Bayamon. We are supplementing the capacity at the hospitals with three temporary medical shelters at HURRA and additional shelters to be constructed at HIMA-Cupey next week. At HURRA, the medical shelters are being used as an extra triage and check-in area for two patients at a time, allowing for six feet of space in-between them. HIMA-Cupey will use the temporary medical shelters to screen patients for COVID-19 outside of the Emergency Department, to decrease the risk of exposure for non-coronavirus patients.

Within International Medical Corps’ temporary medical shelters, our four partner hospitals will have the much needed additional capacity to support patients who test positive for COVID-19.

We thank the GlobalGiving community for continuing to support our emergency response efforts in Puerto Rico.

The view inside the medical shelter.
The view inside the medical shelter.
Medical shelters provide necessary extra capacity.
Medical shelters provide necessary extra capacity.
 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.