Apr 11, 2018

WFSS U.S. team returns from South Sudan

Women line up at the well with jerry cans
Women line up at the well with jerry cans

WFSS Executive Director Lynn Malooly recently traveled to South Sudan with WFSS Board President Glenn Balch, Board Member Anne Turner, and Operations Support Coordinator Gary Prok. The U.S. team spent time with WFSS's South Sudan leadership team and staff at our compound in Wau and in the field. Always striving to improve and operate more efficiently, the visiting team observed operations and offered advice on streamlining some of our systems in South Sudan. 

The U.S. team was thrilled to have the opportunity to meet the South Sudan staff and some of the people that we serve. One of the sites they visited was the Zagalona School in Wau. WFSS installed a well at the school and in January, broke ground on our first sanitation project, latrines for the school. The latrines are on target to be completed by April 30th. "It was endearing to have all of the children greet us," said Lynn, "the sound of children playing is the same all over the world." 

The U.S. team was impressed with how hard everyone in South Sudan works. They have a hard life, even when made easier by having access to clean water it is still very difficult. When there is a well women still have to tote their water in jerry cans. However, they know that the water is uncontaminated and they don't have to walk so far, meaning that they are able to have more than just enough water to meet the minimal needs of their families. Now perhaps they have enough water to bathe everyday, to wash clothes, and to water a garden that provides food for their families.

The WFSS team works extremely hard as well and face many challenges in their work. Many tasks that are automated in the U.S. are still manual for our team. Traveling throughout the countryside is very hard on our equipment because roads are not paved where they are working. If something breaks down in the field, they have to figure out a way to make repairs. "The ingenuity of the team to solve problems is incredible," stated Lynn. 

The 2018 drilling season will conclude in May. To date this season WFSS has drilled 29 new wells in villages without access to clean water, rehabbed 6 of our older wells, and conducted hygiene training in all 35 villages, as well as implementing the sanitation project at the Zagalona School.      

WFSS well at Zagalona School serves 800 students
WFSS well at Zagalona School serves 800 students
A new well in Majok Kuel Village
A new well in Majok Kuel Village
Jan 22, 2018

The Impact of Your Gift to Water for South Sudan

Clean water is a luxury in rural South Sudan.
Clean water is a luxury in rural South Sudan.

Visualize a one gallon jug of water and then picture two rows of one gallon jugs, one row with 100 jugs to represent the average American's daily water use and one row with five jugs to represent the average African's daily water use. In America we take water for granted, never worrying that there won't be enough or that we won't have easy access to safe drinking water. In South Sudan clean water is a luxury many do not have. They have to seek a water source and often the source is contamintated. When a village has a well many things change for people. Women and girls no longer have to walk for water and when their time is freed they can grow food or build a business and girls can attend school.

On average, a well drilled by Water for South Sudan in a remote village serves 750 people. Women and girls stand in line at the well each day to collect water for their family. And they are grateful that the water is clean and is only a mile or so from their homes, as opposed to the five miles that many have to walk. In America virtually every home has fresh water piped into its kitchen, laundry room, and bathroom, and many houses have as many bathrooms as people living in the home. Can you imagine having to walk a mile and then stand in line with a jerry can to get your daily supply of water? 

The average cost of a one liter bottle of water in the US is $1.00. The average cost per liter of water from a WFSS well is .00026. For $15 you can purchase 15 one liter bottles of water in the US or provide 58,594 liters of clean water to a village in South Sudan. In October, 2018 WFSS will celebrate its 15th anniversary. Over the course of a year giving $15 per month will provide 703,128 liters of water to an isolated village in South Sudan - the impact on lives is immeasurable.

WFSS' 2018 drilling season kicked-off in December. Our drilling, rehab, and hygiene teams are hard at work in the field. Our goals for 2018 are to drill up to 40 new wells, to rehab up to 50 wells, and to provide hygiene training in each village where we work, potentially 90 villages. In addition, WFSS has broken ground on its first sanitation project - latrines in a school. 

Thank you for your support. 

Dirty water must be flushed out of a new well.
Dirty water must be flushed out of a new well.
After the dirty water is flushed comes clean water
After the dirty water is flushed comes clean water
With a well in her village, she can go to school
With a well in her village, she can go to school

Links:

Nov 9, 2017

Thank you for helping WFSS to fund a well

watering the collard greens
watering the collard greens

Water for South Sudan Founder Salva Dut, our managers and drilling team in South Sudan, and our Board of Directors and administrative staff in the US all want to thank you for contributing to this project. We are grateful for each contribution that helped us to reach our goal. 

Our team in South Sudan has been hard at work preparing to begin the 2018 drilling season next month. Peter Schaller, Chief of Logistics for the World Food Programme has declared South Sudan to be the most complex country in the world. "You need about 10 contingency plans for one task." WFSS has found this statement to be accurate. There are many things that we cannot control and we have to adjust our plans to accommodate unexpected logistics issues. For example, shipments of supplies not arriving on schedule.

WFSS (volunteer) Director of Operations is in the United States, which adds to the complexity of working in South Sudan. However, the Executive Director and Director of Operations have been working towards moving more of the operations management and decision making to our managers in South Sudan. To this end, the South Sudan Leadership Council, comprised of our managers in South Sudan, was recently created. The Leadership Council and WFSS Executive Director and Director of Operations have a weekly skype call. This is proving to be effective. 

Our founder and managers are all former "Lost Boys" of the Sudan. Local leadership offers WFSS a great benefit in working in South Sudan. Our team knows the people, the customs, and the language. They are easily able to navigate the country. When they go into a village to drill a well they are trusted because they are South Sudanese and because they have already communicated with county and community leaders. An integral piece of the WFSS process is to engage the community and work with them rather than come in with a top down approach.   

The well funded through this project will be drilled during the 2018 season. At the end of the season we will post another report with information about the village where the well is located and pictures. In the meantime, we have a new project on GlobalGiving, so please take a look and if you feel moved, continue to support our work.

Yinca Leek (thank you in Dinka, the language of WFSS founder Salva) 

Boy at well
Boy at well
With a well in his village, this child is thriving
With a well in his village, this child is thriving
 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.