Mar 4, 2021

Support Afghans to diagnose Blood Cancers

Father and daughter
Father and daughter

Support Afghans to diagnose Blood Cancers



Afghanistan is amongst one of those countries which has 81% patients who suffers to blood cancer every year due to lack of sanitation and medical treatment access which is a big hurdle for the people’s life.

Afghanistan has very limited or no facilities for timely and proper diagnosis of lethal diseases including Leukemia (Blood cancer). This results in loss of lives and heavy burden on families due to delays in detection of cases and treatment. On the other hand, in Afghanistan there was no facility available for diagnosis of blood cancer and genetic disorders. FMIC launched its cytogenetic testing facility in 2020 and now physicians are referring patients but they are unable to afford testing. FMIC took lead role by initiating the first ever cytogenetic testing in Afghanistan to ensure right diagnosis sand prognosis of blood cancer and genetic disorders.

The French Medical Institute for Mothers and Children is the product of a unique four-way partnership that includes the Governments of Afghanistan and France, the Aga Khan University (an agency of the Aga Khan Development Network), and the French humanitarian organization La Chaîne de l’Espoir.

Yearly Afghan people are facing many challenges while traveling to different neighboring countries like Pakistan and India. Thus they spent a lot of time and money. But now they are satisfied and happy from FMIC services because now without extra burden they can do their treatment at FMIC with less expenses and no burden at all.

Since its establishment in 2006, FMIC has so far provided tertiary health services to over 1.6 million patients from all parts of Afghanistan in the form of admissions and clinical visits. In diagnostics, FMIC has performed almost 4.6 million laboratory tests and 0.8 million radiology procedures. Being the first ISO certified hospital in Afghanistan, awarded in 2009; we are now working towards getting the gold seal of Joint Commission International Accreditation (JCIA) for quality and patient safety. FMIC is the first hospital in Afghanistan to perform Nerve Transfer Surgery.

 


FMIC’s Patient Welfare Program is in place since the establishment of FMIC. The program is aimed at supporting those patients who do not have the budget to bear their healthcare expense. FMIC has spent over $40 million so far in providing the medical and surgical care to those in critical need. We are highly grateful to the generosity of our donors for their support to the patient welfare which ultimately helps us serve the most deserving and deprived segments of the society. 
FMIC patient welfare program helps the poor patients for their health care when they are unable to pay for their treatment. With the current growing demand each year, the hospital is in dire needs and support to continue this life-saving endeavor.

We are highly grateful to the generosity of our donors for their support to the patient welfare which ultimately helps us serve the most deserving and deprived segments of the society.

On a daily basis, FMIC ensures that no patient leaves the hospital untreated because of lack of money. For many patients, even a $10 expense is an obstacle to healthcare. Envision a child or mother suffering from life-threatening diseases in an impoverished and war-affected zone. Imagine that just a few dollars contributed by you can help save lives and improve quality of life for many. For example, $10 will pay for an initial visit to a doctor, $15 will pay for one-night stay of a patient in general ward, $65 will pay for one night stay of a patient in the Intensive Care Unit.  We do appreciate your continued support and cooperation!  

With the beginning of our cytogenetic services; we have already started impacting lives. Naveed (7) diagnosed with blood cancer was referred to FMIC but the correct type of diagnosis was possible only through cytogenetic test hence he received the right treatment otherwise he could have lost his life due to wrong treatment. We believe that this project is a key step towards saving lives in a country where people are suffering due to conflict for decades. This will also correspond to SDG-3.

Karim Success Story:

Karim (13) hails from a village in Sar-e-Pol province, Afghanistan. He was studying in grade 7th with brilliance in all subjects. Meanwhile, this little boy was curious to see how petrol catches fire. In early 2019, he somehow got hold of a 3-littre bottle of petrol and tried to ignite it with matches. Suddenly the flames captured him allover and the right side of his body got burnt and put him in critical condition. The scorches on his body made his life miserable and he needed emergency care. He lost movement completely since the muscles were damaged due to “Grade 3 burns.”

His father (Mohammad Nabi) took him to different hospitals in Mazar province, but to no avail. One of his relatives knew about FMIC and advised Rasool to give it a try. Karim was then brought to FMIC in August 2020, as a last resort.

Dr Homayoon Ghairatmal, one of the renowned Paediatric surgeon at FMIC performed a surgery of skin graft and contracture release 10 times during 3 months of Karim’s stay at FMIC- ICU to rescue Karim from the trauma. This paid off and Khal recovered fast. His excitement was worth noticing when he started moving, talking and walking again without any pain. Little Karim received financial assistance from Enabled Children Initiative (ECI) and FMIC Patient Welfare Programme.

On December 24, 2020, he visited Dr Homayoon for the second time and the 11th surgery of skin graft was done. According to the physician, the patient is healthy, but he needs some physiotherapy and probably an elbow joint replacement to release the bone contracture.

Karim’s father was so happy that his little son is healthy after facing the odds. In a recent conversation with FMIC communications team, Karim himself narrated the story of his adventure while advising other children not to play with flames AT ALL!

 

Resources

https://www.fmic.org.af/Pages/Home.aspx
FMIC official website
FMIC official Facebook Page

Dr Humayoon with Karim
Dr Humayoon with Karim

Links:

Feb 25, 2021

Ensuring Access to Quality Health Care

Angela Photo
Angela Photo

FMIC ensures that cost should not build hurdle for families who needs medical care. Thus makes healthcare accessible for the needy people in Afghanistan.  FMIC patient welfare program helps the poor patients for their healthcare when they are unable to pay for their treatment. With the current growing demand each year, the hospital is in dire needs and support to continue this life-saving endeavor.

The French Medical Institute for Mothers and Children is the product of a unique four-way partnership that includes the Governments of Afghanistan and France, the Aga Khan University (an agency of the Aga Khan Development Network), and the French humanitarian organization La Chaîne de l’Espoir.

FMIC has so far served over 1.6 million patients from all over Afghanistan through its in-patient and out-patient services. In diagnostics, 4.6 million Laboratory tests and 0.8 Million Radiology procedures have been performed thus far. FMIC’s Patient Welfare Programme underwrites the cost of care for people who cannot afford to pay for all or part of their treatment.  Since FMIC’s inception in 2006 to date FMIC’s Patient Welfare Program has spent over $40 million so far in providing the medical and surgical care to those in critical need.


We are highly grateful to the generosity of our donors for their support to the patient welfare which ultimately helps us serve the most deserving and deprived segments of the society.

On a daily basis, FMIC ensures that no patient leaves the hospital untreated because of lack of money. For many patients, even a $10 expense is an obstacle to healthcare. Envision a child or mother suffering from life-threatening diseases in an impoverished and war-affected zone. Imagine that just a few dollars contributed by you can help save lives and improve quality of life for many. For example, $10 will pay for an initial visit to a doctor, $15 will pay for one-night stay of a patient in general ward, $65 will pay for one night stay of a patient in the Intensive Care Unit.  We do appreciate your continued support and cooperation!  

 

Angela can play with her toys now– Nerve transfer performed for the first time in Afghanistan

Angela can play with her toys now– Nerve transfer performed for the first time in Afghanistan.

 Angela’s parents were delighted as they were expecting a baby in early 2019. They had bundles of hope and plans for the new addition to their family. Likewise, Angela’s grandfather was super excited and dreamt of her granddaughter becoming a doctor. All those dreams and hopes were badly shattered upon the birth of the baby when the family discovered that Angela had nerve disorder in her upper limb. She was suffering from weakness and motion disorder in her right upper limb. Her parents took this 3-month baby to a local hospital in their native province – Baghlan. The hospital referred her to La Chaine de l’Espoir (One of FMIC’s partners) in Kabul for the financial assistant to her treatment in Kabul.

The LaChaine office referred Angela to FMIC for treatment. Based on the diagnosis, Angela was found suffering from brachial plexus birth palsy in which paralysis or weakness of the upper limb was present.

Angela was unable to elevate her right shoulder and flex her right elbow. Initially, she went through a process of physiotherapy but the result was not convincing and the doctors at FMIC opted for a surgical approach. In this operation, a nerve transfer was performed for the first time in Afghanistan. After the operation done by, orthopedic surgeon at FMIC, the casting was applied for 6 months. In the first follow-up of Angela, she was able to move her hand and arm.

The next stage of the treatment includes physiotherapy for almost three years. It is really heartening that Angela is improving fast. Her smiles bring a spark of hope and her family gets excited each time she holds her toys.

 

https://www.fmic.org.af/Pages/Home.aspx
Link to FMIC website - Patient Welfare Programme
FMIC Website - Home Page
FMIC Annual Reports
FMIC Patient Welfare Program- A ray of hope!

Links:

Feb 15, 2021

Reaching the Unreached-FMICPatient Welfare Program

FMIC’s high quality and unique services are utilized by patients from all of Afghanistan’s thirty-four provinces. The partners’ and donors’ contributions to FMIC’s patient welfare program and La Chaîne de l’Espoir’s Women and Children’s House ensures that patients with limited means to pay, including the very poorest, have access to FMIC services. In the year 2021, FMIC will be celebrating 15 years of its services in Afghanistan. One of FMIC’s mission is to enable Afghan patients’ access to an international standard of care, regardless of their ability to pay.

According to WHO report; too many people in Afghanistan die every year because of tuberculosis which is a completely preventable and curable disease in Afghanistan. Governement of Afghanistan is committed to ensuring that each and every Afghan has access to quality TB services and medicines and that people are better informed about the disease, its causes and symptoms so they know to seek care when needed. We need to also fight the stigma associated with TB.

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, caused mainly by poor management and treatment of regular TB cases by low quality medicine, has emerged as a serious challenge for Afghanistan. “Last year more than 1,200 people developed multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Afghanistan. This is a serious issue and we need to do much more to reverse this trend, to strengthen screening and testing, treatment and follow-up.

“It is unacceptable that many tuberculosis cases go undiagnosed, untreated or are not cured. We should make sure everyone has access to information, good-quality medicines and services. “Nobody should be left behind in the fight against TB. We need to accelerate progress towards zero TB deaths, infections, suffering and stigma.”

FMIC’s Patient Welfare Programme underwrites the cost of care for people who cannot afford to pay for all or part of their treatment. Given the situation of chronic poverty in Afghanistan, the demands on the Welfare Fund are overwhelming. Since FMIC’s inception in 2006 to date FMIC’s Patient Welfare Program has spent over $40 million so far in providing the medical and surgical care to those in critical need. The patient welfare program follows a standard criterion to assess the needs of patients before awarding the welfare support. 

As TB is one of the most common diseases in Afghanistan. It takes a minimum of three operations to treat a child with spinal tuberculosis. There are many children from humble backgrounds who cannot afford the operation and remain deprived of walking for life. With just $500, you can help these young kids for surgeries which can make them walk and again and enjoy their lives.

On a regular basis, FMIC receives patients from different parts of Afghanistan. FMIC has so far served over 1.5 million patients from all parts of Afghanistan through its in-patient, out-patient services and diagnostic services. In diagnostics, 4.3 million Laboratory Tests and 0.8 Million Radiology Procedures have been performed thus far.

These are just few stories of how FMIC supports patients with complex medical conditions not only by providing them high quality medical care but also extends helping hands to them financially as well. On a daily basis, FMIC ensures that no patient should go without treatment due to lack of money. For many patients, even a $10 expense is an obstacle to healthcare. Join hands with FMIC and donate now!

 

Resources

https://www.fmic.org.af/Pages/Home.aspx
FMIC Website
FMIC LinkedIn


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