Jan 24, 2021

FW: second interim report

The photos have not been added – what can we do so you put them? xxTigris

 

From: tikoeducation@gmail.com <tikoeducation@gmail.com>
Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2021 11:24 AM
To: report+48068@globalgiving.org
Subject: second interim report

 

Beating covid-19 with climate change resilience

The Tikondane community still needs your further help, as Covid-19 has prevented any guests from coming to our lodge so our main income which came from the lodge is nil. We have reduced the hours worked at Tiko and asked the crew of 72 to work in their fields and gardens instead. This they are doing and for once the rains, have been fabulous.

You helped us to give them extra help to buy seeds and we also introduced yams, a new crop which is the main food in many countries in West Africa. Yams are drought resistant, while maize, the traditional food here needs expensive seed and expensive artificial fertilizer. Cassava, introduced to replace maize was not successful, suffering depredations caused by uncontrolled marauding cows.

After a workshop on cultivating yams which fired the enthusiasm of the crew, we ordered 4000 seed yams and subsequently 2000 more thus further increasing costs. A further addition was the cost of bamboo sticks to support the growing yam plants.

We still need help to pay the allowances of our crew and costs such as those for leaking roofs, and fences. Poverty is now so great, that stealing has greatly increased.  Alas our usual provision for hunger help in the months, Dec – April, is not enough. Sadly, covid-19 has come to Zambia and infections are increasing at a threatening speed. Whatever happens, there will be a big demand for yams, since few had money for the expensive artificial fertilizer, that is needed for the cultivation of maize

Jan 24, 2021

second interim report

For once the rains are good! Hilda in the flourish
For once the rains are good! Hilda in the flourish

Beating covid-19 with climate change resilience

The Tikondane community still needs your further help, as Covid-19 has prevented any guests from coming to our lodge so our main income which came from the lodge is nil. We have reduced the hours worked at Tiko and asked the crew of 72 to work in their fields and gardens instead. This they are doing and for once the rains, have been fabulous.

You helped us to give them extra help to buy seeds and we also introduced yams, a new crop which is the main food in many countries in West Africa. Yams are drought resistant, while maize, the traditional food here needs expensive seed and expensive artificial fertilizer. Cassava, introduced to replace maize was not successful, suffering depredations caused by uncontrolled marauding cows.

After a workshop on cultivating yams which fired the enthusiasm of the crew, we ordered 4000 seed yams and subsequently 2000 more thus further increasing costs. A further addition was the cost of bamboo sticks to support the growing yam plants.

We still need help to pay the allowances of our crew and costs such as those for leaking roofs, and fences. Poverty is now so great, that stealing has greatly increased.  Alas our usual provision for hunger help in the months, Dec – April, is not enough. Sadly, covid-19 has come to Zambia and infections are increasing at a threatening speed. Whatever happens, there will be a big demand for yams, since few had money for the expensive artificial fertilizer, that is needed for the cultivation of maize

The yam plants are growing well. they must be supp
The yam plants are growing well. they must be supp
Tiko's Black Australobe chickens with a new fence
Tiko's Black Australobe chickens with a new fence

Attachments:
Dec 17, 2020

Beating Covid-19 with Climate Change Resilience

It is a great joy to report that Tiko has had no case of covid-19. Also, the crew has had a positive reaction to the halving of their usual allowances and work time by putting great effort into the improvement of their cultivation methods with the hope of producing sufficient food for their families and having some produce to sell.

There were requests for covers for compost heaps, chicken wire to protect the bag gardens from chickens and seeds. Everyone was supplied with vegetable seeds, and seed for soya, cowpeas, groundnuts/peanuts, sunflower.  Soya, which also provides some protein, has become a favourite food crop. As it has increased in price, we gave out extra seed which means that people will also have some soya for sale in April/May 2021 if there is a good yield. 51 wells have been deepened.

The big news however is that we have been able to hold a workshop on the cultivation of yams, which provide a food staple throughout much of Africa. Yams are more tolerant of drought than maize and less attractive to grazing cattle. Work is going ahead to dig deep holes in which to plant the yams.

Thanks to all who have already contributed to this project which is continuing to help the members of the Tikondane Community through the hungry period with hope for the future.

 
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