Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF)

The Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF; formerly the Nepalese Youth Opportunity Foundation, NYOF) is devoted to bringing hope to the most destitute children in the beautiful but impoverished Himalayan country of Nepal. With a personal touch, we provide these children with what should be every child's birthright - education, housing, medical care, and loving support. Empowered to reach their potential, these children blossom, enriching the world we all share.
Apr 5, 2013

The Gift of Education

Although 70% of Nepali children enroll in primary school, many of them drop out before the 5th grade. In the rural areas where we work, the dropout rate is very high. Often, a family simply can’t afford the cost of the school uniform and school supplies, or even the very small school fee. Furthermore, many parents expect their children to work on the family farm or do housework all day.

IMG_1148
In several rural districts in Nepal, the Nepal Youth Foundation grants scholarships to children to cover their school expenses. This is the first generation in most of these areas to receive an education. The cost – about $100 a year per child – is an incredible investment. An education will best prepare these youngsters for the very difficult future that awaits them, since an increasing number of the next generation in Nepal’s overpopulated hills will inherit no land and will have no choice but to find their fortunes competing for jobs in the cities.

We’ve seen some interesting ripple effects from this program. Our scholarships motivate parents other than those whose children we support to send their children to school, too. There is social pressure in the village when some kids go to school and others do not. (Keeping up with the Joneses, Nepali style.) Some parents hope that their children will also be sponsored if they start school. Headmasters tell us that there are noticeable rises in general attendance after we bring our scholarship program to their schools.

Our field workers visit the schools regularly to check on the children and to see how the school is functioning. To do the job, they walk the mountain paths of isolated rural areas, sometimes ten hours a day, stopping at various village schools along the way to survey the situation and discuss problems with the headmasters and students.

The Nepal Youth Foundation supports children until they can support themselves. After they graduate from high school, we provide them with college scholarships or vocational training.

Links:

Feb 7, 2013

Rescue Children Suffering from Severe Malnutrition

Nursed back to health
Nursed back to health

Expanding

The NRHs are located in 12 districts throughout the country. The total capacity of 12 NRHs is 143 beds. With an average of 30 children staying days and a ninety percent occupancy target, these NRHs have a capacity to serve 1570 malnourished children per year. NYF is currently managing 7 NRHs with 84 beds capacity.  Four new NRHs are underway in Baglung, Dang, Butwal and Dailekh.

Two week long intensive training sessions for the staff of NRH-Bharatpur (recently established on April 27) was conducted by the experts from Kathmandu NRH. All the NRHs are operated in the same model of the Kathmandu NRH and hence, Kathmandu NRH has been acting as a resource and training center for the outlying NRHs. An orientation was also organized in Bharatpur in which representatives from District Health Office, local health posts, doctors, nurses, and other medical personals were invited. The purpose was to expand network and disseminate information about the NRH and its working modality amongst the associated people and institutions. 

Nutritional Outreach Camp

NRH Kathmandu conducted two Nutritional Outreach Camps in these 6 months: 609 children were screened out of which 432 (71%) were found to be in normal health condition and 29% were malnourished. Education on nutrition and health was provided to the mothers/guardians of the children, especially those with malnutrition. The severely malnourished children were referred to the NRH for further treatment.

Within the 7 NRHs under NYF, 490 children, 278 boys and 212 girls, were admitted and provided nutritional care. Among them 88% (431) belonged to age-group under 5.

Likewise, 519 children (277) male and (242 female) were discharged: 387were discharged officially after they reached normal weight, 81 were discharged on request, and 38 were referred to the hospital and 13 left against medical advice.

460 care takers were trained about food, nutrition, health hygiene, and sanitation through demonstrations and practical sessions.   

939 follow-ups were carried out and most of the children’s health conditions were found to be satisfactory. Few children were still malnourished due to poor economic condition and/or chronic medical complications. 12 death cases were also reported in this period which is quite high as compared to other times.

NRH Kathmandu provides vaccination to those children who did not have chance to receive necessary vaccines prior to their arrival at NRH. During this quarter, 14 children were administered TT, 23 were administered MMR and 30 children received vaccine against Meningitis.

In coordination with the hospital and District Public Health office, NRH-Surkhet has started to provide immunization services to the children of Surkhet and adjoining districts. The addition of this facility has made it easier for the people to know about our facilities when they bring their children for vaccination and we have been able to identify and treat more children as a result.   

For those parents who were unable to stay at the NRHs, counseling was provided on feeding appropriate balanced diet to recover the weight of the child. These counseling sessions have proved to be quiet effective as majority of the guardians reported good improvement in their children.   

In case of the 5 NRHs which are handed over: 282 children were admitted and 275 mothers/caretakers were educated in nutrition and health in these 6 months.

 

Dietician Training for Health Professionals

The highly positive outcome from the previous Diet Management Training (especially for staff from zonal hospitals) encouraged us to give continuity to this project and hence, a 2nd training was conducted (September 23 - October 2, 2012), this time aiming to build the capacity of the district hospitals.

The core components of the training were:

  1. Basic knowledge of nutrition
  2. Diet management for specific age groups and physical status
  3. Diet management targeted at patients with specific diseases
  4. Management of acute and chronic malnutrition

After the completion of the 10 days training (1st phase), the trainees went back to their workplaces. The Manager of the Kathmandu NRH and the Nutrition Coordinator for Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF) then carried out follow up of the participants in their respective workplaces. The follow up showed that the participants were effectively implementing the training content in their workplaces (hospitals and NRHs) through sharing of the training content with the hospital management team and the staff, displaying posters and other information on diet and diseases in hospitals, diet counseling for patients, menu preparation for patients and improving the management of the hospital kitchen. 

 

Malnourished baby
Malnourished baby

Links:

Feb 7, 2013

Psychological Counseling for Impoverished Children

Sand Play Therapy Session
Sand Play Therapy Session

Ankur Counseling Center

Outcomes  •  2011 – 2012

Psychological counseling in Nepal is in its infancy, although many children suffer from emotional trauma. NYF’s Ankur Counseling Center is a pioneer in psychological therapy for disadvantaged children in Nepal. Ankur also offers a wide range of training for people who work with youth.

Since the Ankur Counseling Center began in 2006, it has provided free psychological therapy to 2213 underprivileged children. In 2011-2012, 604 people benefited from therapy at the Center in Kathmandu, and 783 girls who were rescued from bonded servitude received peer counseling in Western Nepal. Ankur also held 28 training sessions and workshops through the year for 415 participants. Altogether, the program brought therapy, counseling, and training to1802 people in 2011-2012.

NYF’s Solution

Emotional health is largely neglected in Nepal and psychology is only beginning to gain acceptance. However, many people, especially disabled children, orphans, and homeless youth, suffer from oppression and discrimination.

To meet this need, the Nepal Youth Foundation established the Ankur Counseling Center in 2006. Ankur’s counselors, who have Masters degrees in clinical psychology, provide psychosocial therapy to hundreds of underprivileged children every year. This counseling is enabling children who have endured unimaginable hardships at very young ages to fulfill their potential.

In addition to individual counseling, Ankur’s therapists run group therapy sessions and workshops for youth. These are particularly beneficial to the boys and girls who live at J and K House, NYF’s children’s homes, many of whom face similar emotional and behavioral challenges. The therapy sessions teach children about interpersonal relationships, self-esteem, and leadership, and the workshops cover topics such as stress management and drug abuse.

Ankur is the first center in Nepal to use Sand Play Therapy, a form of psychological therapy which transcends language and is therefore especially suitable to the needs of children. Ankur’s counselors now train other psychologists to use sand play therapy.  

The Center complements its psychosocial counseling with a wide range of trainings and workshops for hundreds of people every year. The participants, who come from throughout Nepal to attend the trainings, include professionals and students in the field of psychology, child care workers, teachers, and parents, as well as children. Ankur also provides trainings for child care professionals, such as therapists, teachers, and staff of orphanages.  Some of the topics are Peer Counseling, Parenting skills, Creative Movement Therapy, Positive Discipline, and Motivational Communication Skills.

Links:

 
   

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