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Mar 16, 2015

The Definition of Success at a Horse Rescue

Gracie
Gracie

At Easy R Equine Rescue, we get horses for various reasons, but our goal for each one of them is to provide all needed rehabilitation services and rehome into a loving forever home.  We would consider ourselves "successful" if we accomplish that with every horse.  But what if we don't? Have we failed? What about Gracie?

Gracie was brought to Easy R near the end of the summer in 2014.  Her arrival came after numerous attempts by concerned horse people in our community to convince her previous owner to surrender her.  She was underweight, had scrapes and wounds inflicted on her by other horses, and had a very deformed hoof which created much pain and lameness.  Her name was not Gracie at the time.  But, as with other mistreated or neglected horses, we changed her name.  And also changed the quality of what was to become the last several months of her life.  

We knew from the beginning that her hoof was in such poor condition that she might not have a good prognosis for recovery.  But we paid for a farrier to work on her hoof on numerous occasions, provided multiple laser therapy sessions, fed her high quality feed and hay, and watched the life come back into her eyes.  Gracie was with a wonderful, loving foster family from day 1.  They loved Gracie and groomed her, let her graze the green grass around their house, and provided affection and attention on a daily basis.  In January, the staff at Easy R took Gracie to a veterinarian who specializes in equine health and lameness.  The x-rays on her hoof revealed our worst fear for Gracie.  The coffin bone in her hoof was severely damaged; in fact, much of it had demineralized and was gone. (Two photos are attached to this project report which shows a normal coffin bone and Gracie's coffin bone).  After consultation with the vet and knowing in our hearts the right thing to do to prevent the certain, excrutiating pain she would always be in, we made the decision to euthanize Gracie.  

Some would consider that failure.  And although we couldn't save Gracie from the negative impact as a result of years of neglect at the hands of her previous owner(s), we still consider her case a success.  Gracie had more love, affection, attention, and quality food and care in her last 6 months of life than she might have ever had.  Certainlyway more than she was getting from her previous owner.  Had we never had the chance to add her to the Easy R herd, she would have wasted away and probably become so lame that she couldn't move.  And would have died there on the property where we have heard that other horses have died as a result of neglect.  

Why am I telling you this? The care Gracie received in those 6 months was costly.  The last vet exam, x-rays, and euthanasia was costly.  And we consider every penny spent well worth it in order to provide her that care and ultimate relief from pain.  But we could not do what we do without donors like you who give through Global Giving. We couldn't save more horses like Gracie, even when it means that we have to make a decision to euthanize.  Saving and rehabbing horses is expensive and we cannot say thank you enough to people like you who help make it happen.

On March 18th, Global Giving is offering a 30% match on all donations to our project up to $1000 per donor.  There is $60,000 available in matching funds and matching begins at 9:00:01 EDT and lasts until funds run out or 23:59:59 EDT. So March 18th would be a great day to give to help more horses like Gracie. The key is to donate at the beginning of the day so your gift will be matched at 30% before the available funds run out.   Thank you so much for your past financial gift to our project and for considering to support us once again on March 18th.  

Gracie's foundered hoof
Gracie's foundered hoof
X-ray of Gracie's hoof and coffin bone
X-ray of Gracie's hoof and coffin bone
A normal hoof and coffin bone x-ray
A normal hoof and coffin bone x-ray

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Feb 4, 2015

Pilot Gets a Forever Home

Pilot at the vet
Pilot at the vet

In late July we received a call from a Deputy at the Lubbock County Sheriff's Department reporting that he was on his way to seize 5 unhealthy, malnourished horses from a property in Lubbock County.  The situation was dire.  All of the horses (19 in all) were in less-than-desirable condition, but he was only taking the ones most in need of rescue.  The deputy asked if we could take three of the five.  So we immediately secured foster care. Two of the horses were mares and one was a young stud horse whose first stop was to the vet to be gelded (castrated).  The vet techs called him Pilot while he was there and that name stuck.  Though in better condition than the mares, Pilot was underweight and malnourished.  He was leery of people but showed some willingness to learn to trust them.

Because we had the funds that were donated through the Global Giving program,and the financial generosity of the foster homes, we were able to provide all the medical and nutritional needs of Pilot.  He was started on a feeding program that included high quality grain, hay, and supplements.  He was seen by the farrier and dentist (his teeth had probably never been tended to) and received vaccinations.

Pilot's first foster home was with a family who had a pre-teen boy named Tanner.  Tanner had a way with Pilot and they became buddies.  But unfortunately, this family had to move to California, so Pilot transferred to another foster home with a lady named Corrie.  At Corrie's barn there was a mare named Mama that immediately claimed Pilot for her own, and they became fast friends.  And because best friends shouldn't be separated, Corrie and her family applied to permanently adopt Pilot into their herd.  He is at a healthy weight and now allows people to catch and halter him without too much difficulty.  And he and Mama stay side by side.

We couldn't report on stories like Pilot's if not for people who donate to the Global Giving campaign.  The funds allow us to provide the best possible care for horses such as Pilot, and not cut corners because we don't have enough money. Easy R Equine Rescue wants to say a heart-felt thank you to every single person who has given to the campaign.  

Pilot and Tanner at first foster home
Pilot and Tanner at first foster home
Pilot and Mama
Pilot and Mama
Pilot and his adoptive mom, Corrie
Pilot and his adoptive mom, Corrie

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Nov 3, 2014

Hurting Horses Find Respite at Easy R Equine Rescue

Gracie
Gracie

In our August report, we told you about two little malnourished mares who had just joined the Easy R herd via the local Sheriff's department.  We are pleased to report that Andi and Ginger have been gaining consistent weight and establishing themselves within the small herd.  Though they are still very food-motivated, they aren't acting as frantic during feeding times.  They need to gain a bit more weight before winter arrives, but are well on their way.  Even though the two still stick fairly close together, Ginger is realizing that the big BLM Mustang horse named Tango is a pretty cool buddy too.

Three weeks ago we were able to finally gain custody of a mare badly in need of rescue.  She was living in deplorable conditions, not being fed adequate or quality feed, and was in a great deal of pain as a result of a badly foundered front hoof. As we do with most horses coming out of situations such as these, we immediately gave her a new name--Gracie. Grace is underweight and has a severe limp due to the founder.  She also arrived with many scars and open sores, probably from an aggressive pasture mate at her previous home.  Gracie is currently in a local foster home through Easy R.  Therapeutic farrier services have begun, but the road to recovery will be a long, and expensive, one.  She will need to be seen by a farrier approximately twice per month, for at least six months.  She also is receiving laser treatment 1-2 times per week to encourage blood flow and circulation to the damaged hoof and leg.  She may never be completely sound in that leg/foot but hopefully we can provide her some relief from the current pain she is experiencing.  

Therapeutic services for Gracie will be approximately $800 for the first six months.  In addition, she is being started on a very high quality feed that will assist in her weight gain, each 40 pound bag costing $21.00.  Because of donors like you, we can take in horses like Gracie and provide the much needed respite, rehab, and recovery that she needs.  If she had stayed at her previous placement, she surely would've died.  Thank you so much for your generosity and willingness to assist in the mission and vision of Easy R Equine Rescue. This Thanksgiving, we are especially grateful for folks like you.

Gracie needs to gain a bit of weight
Gracie needs to gain a bit of weight
Gracie's foundered hoof
Gracie's foundered hoof

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