Sep 4, 2018

The Most Desperate Rescue Yet

Initial picture we received of Chablis
Initial picture we received of Chablis

In early June, the staff at Easy R Equine Rescue received a call from an area veterinarian's office.  The lady on the other end of the line said she knew someone who knew someone who was extremely concerned about a horse in a town a few hours from Lubbock.  Most of the time we refer people to shelters or rescue organizations nearer their own community, but she almost begged us to take a look at pictures she had been sent of this horse.  So we did.  It was clear that this horse needed immediate help or she was going to die.  And by the looks of the pictures, even with intervention, death was possible.  Long story short, she was loaded up by a concerned family and made the almost three hour trip to Lubbock.  The director of Easy R met them at a local large animal veterinarian's office. Even though the pictures we had seen reflected what poor condition she was in, it always looks even worse in person.  The fact that she made the trip to Lubbock without falling in the trailer proved the fight she still had left in her. 

The neglect Chablis had been suffering was obvious, and extreme.  She was in the worst condition of any horse that Easy R has taken in up to this point.  In addition to her weight being at a critically low level, she had an obvious limp on her right front leg, a very swollen knee, overgrown hooves, evidence of a fungal skin condition, an open wound on a back leg, poor muscle tone, and overall body weakness.  Due to starvation, her bones were all grossly visible, which also revealed a previous shoulder and hip injury.  But her eyes were soft. Almost relieved and expectant that maybe this group of humans examining her would keep her safe and nurture her back to health. 

The pictures attached to this report show her condition upon arrival and progress she is making at the loving and kind hands of a local foster family.  She stayed in the veterinarian hospital for 9 days before being placed with the foster family.  Her care has not been cheap, and more veterinary visits and procedures will be necessary to address continued health issues.  Fortunately, she has responded well to the re-feeding regimen and is slowly but surely putting on weight.  Chablis is in her mid to late 20s and will always need a senior diet with additional supplements. Her skin condition is mostly healed but she still requires topical medication for fungal infections. She is on a daily (and expensive) anti-inflammatory medication for the arthritic knee. Her feet are in poor condition due to the lack of nutrition she suffered for a long period of time.  Regular farrier visits and annual dental care will be crucial for healthy feet and teeth.  Due to her age, starvation, and probable previous use as a brood mare, her sacrum has dropped and in order to keep her female organs healthy, she will most likely need a Caslick's surgery soon.

Ironically, Chablis is probably the kindest horse we have ever had at Easy R.  She has a lip tatoo which reveals her history as a racetrack horse, a demanding and even at times unkind sport.  Based on her body condition, not including the recent starvation, it is obvious she has had many injuries that left her with improperly healed fractured bones and nerve damage.  The fact that she is still kind and loves human interaction is a testament to this horse's heart and spirit.  She is a fighter and has a strong will to live. We will continue to do EVERYTHING we can for this precious horse, making the rest of her life as comfortable and full of love as possible. 

The only way we can take in horses like Chablis and have the funds for their intensive treatment is because people like you give.  You will probably never meet Chablis, or the other rescue horses, but you are a HUGE part of their rescue, rehabilitation, recovery, and restoration.  We thank you and appreciate you so very much.

Nerve damage on shoulder and loss of muscle
Nerve damage on shoulder and loss of muscle
Evidence of starvation and hip injury
Evidence of starvation and hip injury
Sweet, kind face
Sweet, kind face
Spa day with foster family and friends
Spa day with foster family and friends
On the road to recovery
On the road to recovery

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Jun 4, 2018

Springtime Brings April to Easy R Equine Rescue

April's Sweet Face the Day We Met
April's Sweet Face the Day We Met

In mid-April, the Lubbock County Sheriff's Department called on Easy R once again to assist with a mare they had removed from the owner due to serious neglect.  This owner had 8 horses removed from him last year, and once again was not caring adequately for his animals.  In fact, Gabriel, Ranger, and Ocho were 3 of the 8 horses removed from him last year.  We agreed to take the new mare once the court case was completed and she was able to be released to the custody of the sheriff's department. 

We visited her at the animal hospital where she was temporarily being held until the case had gone to court.  Her eyes were kind and gentle, but she was very thin.  Her hair and skin were in poor condition and it appeared that she might have some sort of fungal issue with her skin.  We promised her we would take her as soon as possible and that she would be well cared for at Easy R.

Once the court disposed of the case, the deputies transported the mare to one of our foster homes.  This particular foster mother specifically requests the rescue horses that are in poor condition because she feels she can make a bigger impact on the lives of those types of horses.  So, of course, we agreed that her home would be the best place for this mare.  The day the mare arrived, she was given her own big stall with a turnout attached; she was started on a meal plan to assist with weight gain and nutiritional support; she was given a bath with antifungal shampoo; and she was sweetly welcomed by the foster mom.  And she was given a new name.  April.

In the past month, April has already made great strides toward becoming a healthy horse.  She is gaining weight, her hair is now shiny and black, her feet are trimmed, she is gradually getting to have free access to grazing pasture, and she is getting a nutritious, well-balanced meal plan.  And TLC. A great deal of love and TLC. 

April was being used as a broodmare, repeatedly being bred to have babies that could be sold for a profit.  But not any more.  She will be placed for adoption when she is completely healthy and will able to live out her life with new owners who are willing to either teach her a new job, or just let her be a horse.  April's story might be a lot different if wasn't for donors who are so gracious to give financially to help take care of these horses.  When local rescues say no to the law enforcement agencies, they have no choice but to take the seized horses to the local auction, not knowing with whom and where they will end up.  So, THANK YOU.  Thank you so much for caring for horses in Lubbock, Texas and helping provide them with hope and a new future.

Very Poor Body Condition
Very Poor Body Condition
Poor Hair and Skin Condition
Poor Hair and Skin Condition
Bath with Medicated Shampoo
Bath with Medicated Shampoo
Looking Better and Loving Grazing
Looking Better and Loving Grazing
A Lot of Progress in One Month
A Lot of Progress in One Month

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Mar 7, 2018

Samson's Journey

Samson's first day at Easy R, keeping his distance
Samson's first day at Easy R, keeping his distance

In June of 2016, Easy R Equine Rescue received a call from the Sheriff's Department of a county about 80 miles from Lubbock.  The Deputy informed us they had a Mustang in their custody with a brand from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).  A few weeks earlier, someone had called in a report that a horse was running loose on the highway outside town.  After several failed attempts to catch the horse, the Deputy called a local, elderly rancher and asked him to try roping the horse.  Which he did.  The horse was checked by the local veterinarian and tested for any contagious diseases.  After a full month of attempting to locate the owner of the horse, the Department had done their due diligence and needed a placement for him.  No one had claimed him. 

We went to pick the horse up and placed him in a willing foster home.  These types of situations are disconcerting because we have very little to no information about the horse or its history.  Why was this horse running loose?  Was the owner tired of him and let him loose? Did the horse get out and travel a long distance? Was he even being adequately cared for? The poor condition of his hooves and a 15 inch piece of wire that was severely tangled up inside his long tail would lead someone to guess that he might have been turned out and left to fend for himself.  We quickly learned that he was very leery, distrusting, and more than slightly uncooperative with many things.  It is not too far-fetched to think that someone might have adopted him from a BLM Mustang sale, which happens after mass roundups of wild Mustangs, and got more than they bargained for.  Wild Mustangs are a special breed which takes special skill and a lot of knowledge to competently handle. 

After spending a week at the foster home, the foster dad called us and said he had named him Samson.  It seemed to fit his stocky, strong body and determined attitude.  In several more months, a spot opened up at the Easy R campus and Samson was moved.  His journey, so far, has been interesting to watch.  Over time he has gone from a horse that took MANY weeks to even let someone touch him to a horse that follows us around and looks for reassurance that people are okay and can be trusted.  He still has "demons" that he hasn't let go of.  He still has to be sedated for the farrier to trim his feet; he spooks easily; and being completely agreeable on a lead rope is a work in progress. He wraps his neck around small children, moves in close to be groomed, and gets droopy-eyed when someone scratches right above his muzzle.  He is the first to welcome and accept new herdmates and has formed a strong bond with the other Mustang gelding.  He can be seen standing watch while the rest of the horses nap in the afternoon sun. 

We don't know if there will be an adoptive home that will be appropriate for Samson.  But, if not, we are content to let him just continue being a part of the Easy R herd.  Not ALL horses will be adopted and we desire to give sanctuary to the ones that don't. Donors are the biggest reason we can take in, nurture, and provide continued quality care to Samson, and horses like him.  The financial gifts from our supporters are never taken for granted.  In fact, when we see Samson almost "hug" a little child that comes to Easy R, we are very aware that those moments could not happen without the generosity of people who support our mission.  Thank you.

Putting on some weight
Putting on some weight
Enjoying the winter snow
Enjoying the winter snow
Samson and a West Texas Sunset
Samson and a West Texas Sunset
Samson was the first to welcome Ocho to the herd
Samson was the first to welcome Ocho to the herd
Being sweet with a little boy visitor
Being sweet with a little boy visitor

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