La Reserva Forest Foundation

La Reserva Forest Foundation is a Costa Rican non-profit, tax exempt foundation working to restore and preserve native tropical forests, dedicated to creating "tree bridges" linking isolated forest islands using volunteers and the local school communities, and fighting global warming through various carbon neutral projects.
Aug 9, 2010

Following Up

Bromeliad flower at La Reserva
Bromeliad flower at La Reserva

Thursday, August 5th, two months after planting the “Increasing Tenorio Volcano Forest, Costa Rica”, the maintenance crew went to care for the new seedlings by trimming the tall grass around the base of each. The crew reported that the new trees are doing great, some over 1 meter tall already. This has been an extremely wet year in western Costa Rica.

In fact, it was raining so much while they worked that they didn’t take any photos of the reforested area. This is a report to let you know things are progressing better than expected. The maintenance crew will return in September to all of LRFF’s reforestation sites for cleaning. We will publish photos of this project at that time. In the meantime enjoy these photos of life here at La Reserva on a very rainy day.

Thank you all for your help funding this project. One more step toward healing our Earth.

HUGE ( 4 inches) insect at La Reserva
HUGE ( 4 inches) insect at La Reserva
Mushrooms growing on dead wood
Mushrooms growing on dead wood

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Aug 9, 2010

Come on Everybody, Let’s Get Planting!!

Heather amongst the trees she planted in June
Heather amongst the trees she planted in June

We had many visitors at La Reserva during the month of July. One family, long time supporters of LRFF, came for two days of hiking in the reserve. On Friday, they revered Papa Loco, saw and heard many monkeys and birds. That night we all shared pizzas and played cards.

This family came to La Reserva in Costa Rica for the first time in July of 2007 as tourists. The three boys were younger, the youngest unable to make the entire hike with his mother. The father was so inspired that he went back home in the U.S. came out of retirement and began a carbon offset company. Now, three years later, his company has many qualified employees and is, in fact, two different companies working to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through renewable energy projects, forestry and a new digital grid system for energy use reduction.

On Saturday morning we went over to the seedling nursery. I explained that we can’t plant more trees in the nursery until we have a project to plant them on because over time they become rooted in the soil at the bottom of the bags and are damaged when removed from the nursery. The 8000+ individuals currently in the nursery are waiting to be planted in Project Hometree when it is funded. We have three months of planting season left. Mom and Dad put their heads together and said they would like to finish the funding on this project enabling us to get planting right away.

As we wait for their donation and the ensuing “success” progress report, here are a few photos of our friend, Heather Armstrong, who volunteered at La Reserva in June. She is largely responsible for the healthy new inventory at the La Reserva nursery. Omar La Reserva’s nursery manager, was her best buddy, teaching her about collecting tropical trees and their propagation.

It is imperative this project be planted by November this year. It is 8 hectares of reforestation and in 5 years will be a young viable forest, responsible for sequestering a minimum of 120 metric tons of CO2 per year from our Earth’s atmosphere. The trees in the nursery, the animals in the existing forest wanting to increase and all of us, the volunteer planters, are waiting for YOU, our supporters, to help us implement this project.

Omar Muñoz with his trees
Omar Muñoz with his trees
Heather with Gino the friendly Great Dane
Heather with Gino the friendly Great Dane

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Aug 9, 2010

"Plant it and they will come"

Long-tailed Manakin, La Tejona, Costa Rica
Long-tailed Manakin, La Tejona, Costa Rica

One of the things we say at La Reserva is “If you plant it, they will come!” ‘They’, of course, are the many native animal species whose numbers have been dangerously depleted by their inability to follow their natural migratory patterns.

The project at Finca Salvaje would connect the native forests along the Rio Caliente and the Rio Calientillo. It would allow species such as the endangered Capuchin Monkey to enhance their gene pool by gaining access to additional family groups. It would provide additional food and habitat for a whole host of wildlife.

And perhaps most importantly, the funding of this project will keep existing forests from being cleared to make room for additional pastureland. The reality of life in Costa Rica is that the land has to produce income for those living on it. If we can raise the money for this project we can add to reforested areas rather than losing more much-needed forest. Please help us in our efforts to get planting.

Future corridor site at Finca Salvaje
Future corridor site at Finca Salvaje
Mica snake at La Reserva
Mica snake at La Reserva

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