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Jun 4, 2014

Final Report

This Global GIving project is being revised.  Stay tuned for an exciting health sector training project in the future!  We have built two health clinics in rural Uganda that see over 10,000 a year.  We are now working on how to use the clinics to also provide training opportunities for students interested in the health field.  This may focus on the "gap year" between secondary school and the start of university, often 9-10 months.  We could have students at the clinic during this time and possibly on some school breaks to gain real world experience that will help them in the future when seeking jobs.  Thank you so much for your interest in AAH and please see our other ongoing projects on Global Giving!

Jun 4, 2014

Health Clinic Update

Georgetown Univ. Med Student volunteers at clinic
Georgetown Univ. Med Student volunteers at clinic

The Arlington Academy of Hope, Inc (AAH) is enabling vital health care to be provided to over 20,000 in a very remote part of Uganda.  The first clinic was built next to our primary school in Bumwalukani, Bududa to address students' health issues such as malaria, gastrointestinal issues, etc.  It quickly became a very valuable resource for their families and the community at large.  A second clinic was built in Bupoto, Manafwa, near where our co-founder Joyce Wanda grew up.  Joyce lost four of her sisters to preventable, treatable conditions so she knew first-hand how important it was to have assessible health care.  Today, our partner FIMRC runs the clinic at the AAH school and we run the Bupoto clinic.

Major conditions treated at the clinic are malaria, UTIs, respiratory conditions, HIV/AIDS. We track patient date and health trends at the clinic.  Care for pregnant women, delivery, and care for children aged 0-5 is also provided.  Community outreach plays an important role in making sure patients are taking medicines as prescribed and are making other needed adjustments to get healthier and stay healthy.  There is also follow-up for those diasnosed with HIV/AIDS.

Bupoto is a lovely setting, near the top of the mountain, green and lush.  But it is remote and has intermittent electricity which is a challenge.  Some vaccines and medicines require refrigeration and power is also important for urgent medical care in the evening, including delivering babies.  Soemtimes medicines have to be discarded when the power is out for too long.  We are researching options at the moment for upgrading the solar panels and batteries at the clinic to improve the power situation at the clinic in an affordable way.  The generator is expensive to run, and the more we can use solar power, the better!   Even when there is power, there are spikes which have ruined computer equipment.  Because there is such a high volume of patients and they often do not bring patient medical history with them, we need to computerize this data to have it for their return visits.  Having it all on paper is time consuming and inefficient.  Ultimately, we would also like to be able to use telemedicine at the clnic to treat patients but this will not be a real option until we can improve the power situation at the clinic.

Progress.  We have upgraded and streamlined our procurement processes for medicines and supplies.  This will enable us to, for example, make purchases quarterly instead of monthly, thereby saving time and high transport costs (given our remote location)..

The clinic also provides training opportunities for local residents interested in a career in health.  We fund several nursing scholarships, and the students help out at the clinic while on break so they gain experience. It is also a way for students to give back to the community - something we emphasize at AAH.  School resumed in February, so the nursing students are back at school.

We have been fortunate to have had a number of students from the U.S. volunteering at the clinic, including a Georgetown University medical student who returned for hs second trip to the clinic and several Marymount students pursuing masters degrees in health care management.  They have helped tremendously! 

Note:  We are in the process of developing a training/education project with the clinic and expect to have that up and running soon!

A Marymount Univ. intern comforts a young patient
A Marymount Univ. intern comforts a young patient
Doing inventory by candelight!
Doing inventory by candelight!
visiting clinic stations
visiting clinic stations
Community education room at clinic
Community education room at clinic
The clinic is near the top of the mountain top
The clinic is near the top of the mountain top
Mar 25, 2014

Jan-Mar 2014 Update from our school in the village

a second grader enjoying an art activity
a second grader enjoying an art activity

Please consider supporting us April 16th at noon on GlobalGiving, when there will be a 50% match on your donation, and nonprofits including AAH will be competing for a $10,000 bonus!

The Ugandan school year starts in late January/early February, so our students are now back at school. We welcomed a new class of 50 first graders, always an exciting time at the school!  It is great to see all the students and teachers back, after a well deserved break. A grateful parent of a new first grader summed up what others said as well:

"It is a tremendous blessing to have this school here.  I know my daughter will have a future I could not have dreamed of." - Mary, parent of an Arlington student

AAH is in the top 2% nationwide!  We also got the results of the all-important exam given at the end of seventh grade, called the Primary Leaving Examination (PLE). This determines whether students are able to continue on to secondary school. (Secondary school is for six years and is roughly equivalent to high school plus two years of junior college in the U.S.)  

"My heart is full to think that I am the first in my family to go to secondary school. I will study hard so I can help my family and my community" - Sara, a new secondary student

We are thrilled to announce that once again, 100% of AAH seventh graders passed the Primary Leaving Examination and they have just commenced classes at their respective secondary schools, which are all boarding schools.  This puts AAH in the top 2% of more than 19,000 schools nationwide in terns of national standardized test results, a remarkable achievement for a modest rural school in a very poor area.  This is attributable to hard working students; amazing, dedicated teachers who put in long hours; and wonderful supporters like you! We are humbled and so very grateful for your support.

We stay in touch with our secondary students, helping them adjust to being away from home at school and look forward to welcoming them back over school breaks - when they perform community service as a way of giving back. 

New secondary students include 14 from local government schools which AAH assists.  We believe it is important to have outreach to local, poor public schools as a way to increase our impact. We offer teacher training, some supplies, PLE preparation and most importantly, the benefit of our experience in what works in primary education.  This includes having a Parent Teacher Association, emphasizing teacher and student attendance, providing a school lunch, etc.

Looking for a life changing experience?  Come volunteer with AAH in Uganda or in the U.S.!  We have openings for both volunteers and interns.  If interested, email info@aahuganda.org

Bridget has a great smile in the crowd at recess
Bridget has a great smile in the crowd at recess
Alex, a volunteer, loved time with the students
Alex, a volunteer, loved time with the students
 
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