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Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids

by Cameroon Association of Active Youths
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Grow hope for 150 Cameroon schoolkids
Apr 19, 2017

Persevering despite setbacks

A recent volunteer from Germany submitted the following report:

I worked on the school gardens in six different primary schools, where I taught about healthy food, nutrition and the environment, as well as garden management. I visited each school (G.S Batibo, G.B.S Batibo, G.S Gunda- Bessi, G.S Keonom, G.S Ambo and G.S Kulabei) once a week for about one and a half hours, to either work practically in the garden or theoretically in class. I also tried to motivate the children to develop their own gardens at home or in their community, and to development their organization and cooperation skills.
Unfortunately, there was a teachers' strike in November that lasted until I left in February, which kept me from being able to follow through with ongoing management.
G.S Batibo: In this school, they have big classes, so I worked with over 70 children, even there were only two classes involved. Because of this it was very difficult to get any progress and the children did not really get into the idea of making a garden, and it was very hard to control them. We planted the nurslings right before the strike began, but there was a problem with finding someone to take care of the garden during the strike. No one felt responsible, so this garden wasn't watered or weeded or transplanted.
G.S Gunda- Bessi: In Gunda- Bessi the children were motivated and all teachers supported me when I needed help with anything. It was very easy to connect with these children and they were listening and following all my instructions. We made good progress and managed to find a useful balance between theoretical and practical lessons. After the strike started, children nearby came every morning to water the garden, so the nursery grew quite well. However, cows passed through the garden and ran over the beds, destroying parts of it.
G.B.S Batibo: The start in G.B.S Batibo was quite difficult, as there was a breakdown in communication which took some time to resolve, but after that, the garden went very well. We even managed to build a roof for our nursery (the only school where we managed to do this). After the strike, the teachers took care of the garden and they even prepared a transplanting right before the end of my stay.
G.S Keonom: Keonom was a highly motivated school in my project. There we tried to include as many children as possible, even if not everyone was responsible for the garden. It was very easy to work with these children because they were always happy to work and to learn. It was especially hard work, because of the climate and the quality of the soil in Keonom. But it was a challenge they managed and even after the strike, they didn't give up on the garden.
G.S Kulabei: In Kulabei the project just didn't work out. The children were unmotivated and they didn't care enough to bring their working tools. From week to week I just wasn't able to do anything but give instructions on how to do what I had done in practice with all the other schools. And since they never acted on my lessons, I eventually abandoned them.

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Organization Information

Cameroon Association of Active Youths

Location: Bamenda, north-west region - Cameroon
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Patrick Chung
Bamenda, north-west region Cameroon

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