Support Australian wildlife rescue to release

by NSW Wildlife Information Rescue & Education Service (WIRES)
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Support Australian wildlife rescue to release
Jul 19, 2022

Rescues and rehabilitation efforts continue...

Joey Tasmanian pademelon in rehabilitation
Joey Tasmanian pademelon in rehabilitation

As heavy rains once again cause widespread flooding across the state of New South Wales, your support to WIRES is continuing to provide a daily lifeline of support for Australian native animals at their most vulnerable. 

Here are just three rescue stories, thank you for making them possible! 

Flood affected brushtail possum now in care 

In Sydney, a young female brushtail possum was discovered under a balcony, displaced, disorientated and soaking wet after recent heavy rains. She seemed quite unwell so her WIRES rescuer wrapped her in a towel to dry and warm her, before transporting her to a local vet for a medical check  

Luckily, the young possum had no serious injuries and was placed with her WIRES carer very quickly. She’s now well on her way to recovery and should be due for release near to where she was found in the coming weeks.  

Infant Tasmanian Pademelon rescued just in time 

When a passing motorist called to report a Pademelon that had been hit by a car in the state of Tasmania, she was fairly sure the mother was dead, but hoped we could send a rescuer just in case. 

Her instincts were correct. Whilst the mother had been dead for several hours, a pouch check revealed that her teat was extended, suggesting she’d recently been suckling an infant. 

The WIRES rescuer searched the area and found the young joey, a few metres from the road, hiding amongst rocks. She quickly warmed the joey who was cold, frightened and dehydrated, and provided him with vital fluids. After a few hours of careful monitoring he was transported in our Emergency Response Vehicle to his specialist carer, where he’s now being provided with the care and rehabilitation he needs for an eventual release back into the wild (pictured above). 

Three wombat joeys in the next phase of rehabilitation  

Car accidents and ongoing floods continue to have a devastating impact on wombat populations and WIRES now have several orphaned wombat joeys in care. Whenever possible, wombat joeys are buddied up so they can grow and develop together, before their release.   

Poppet’ pictured below was separated from her mother during the recent floods. She was found in a back garden, exhausted, wet and very cold. 

She’s now been buddied with Gus and Bear, who both lost their mothers in recent car collisions. Both had been relatively protected in their mother’s pouches and had escaped with just a few scratches on their heads. 

Wombat joeys stay with their mother in the pouch for 7-10 months, so all three were far too young to fend for themselves and are now receiving dedicated long term care. 

As you can see from the photo below, they are now at the second stage of their rehabilitation, learning to dig and burrow in their natural environment and it is very thirsty work! 

Thank you again for making these rescues possible. In the last financial year, our Wildlife Rescue Line received over 200,000 calls! This is a significant increase on the year before and we thank you sincerely for making sure so many native animals get the second chance they so desperately need and deserve.

THANK YOU 

Without you, none of this is possible. If you are able to give a gift to support the ongoing rescue, rehabilitation and recovery of wildlife, please donate today and share our project.

Gus, Poppet and Bear in their new enclosure
Gus, Poppet and Bear in their new enclosure

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Comments:

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

NSW Wildlife Information Rescue & Education Service (WIRES)

Location: Brookvale, NSW - Australia
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @WIRESWildlife
Project Leader:
Frances Parkinson
Warringah Mall, NSW Australia
$127,288 raised of $200,000 goal
 
757 donations
$72,712 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

NSW Wildlife Information Rescue & Education Service (WIRES) has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.