Provide nutritious food for malnourished children

by People First Educational Charitable Trust
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Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Provide nutritious food for malnourished children
Meal Time
Meal Time

Hello Everyone,

I am Neelam senior nurse on the People First community health team.

For all that you may read or hear about the economic growth of India, here in Bihar away from the cities little has changed.

The following is from a BBC article very recently published,

“India has the highest number of children suffering from stunted growth in the world, the charity WaterAid says in a new report.

The report, titled Caught Short, says India has at least 48 million stunted children under the age of five.

Nigeria and Pakistan rank second and third with 10.3 and 9.8 million stunted children respectively.

Stunting, which is a consequence of malnutrition in the first two years of a child's life, is largely irreversible. It also affects mental health. Apart from food shortage, other factors like poor sanitation and contaminated drinking water also cause malnutrition, leading to stunted growth among children”.

So you can see how important this nutritious meal programme is to help ensure child health.

Here’s what Rupa says….

Thank you so much for your help in giving us the wonderful tasty meal we get regularly in our village, my mother and the other mothers take turns to cook it for us, and it is the only time my belly feels full! I look forward to it so much!

Thank you all for your support,

Neelam

 

meal in progress
meal in progress

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meal in progress
meal in progress

Hello Everyone,

I am Neelam the senior project nurse on the health project.

I hope you are all well.

Firstly, may I draw your kind attention to our new website address for the Trust

www.peoplefirstbihar.org

Please take a look for all the latest project news.

Here in Bihar its super-hot, one of the hottest summers ever and the team and I have been working hard treating sunstroke and making sure everybody is properly hydrated. Because one of the most pressing health needs is clean water. along with nutritious food we will be hopefully be launching a new micro project for much needed deep bore water hand pumps in the villages so please look out for that.

How bad really is the problem of malnutrition in Bihar?

Eighty-seven per cent of the rural population and 61% of urban residents in Bihar had calorie deficiency during 2009-10, as per reports of National Sample Survey Office. In fact, Bihar ranked 74th (alarming zone) in the global hunger index of 88 countries, according to a Survey of India State Hunger Index 2015. In the same survey, Jharkhand ranked 76th, Odisha 67th and UP 61st, all in the alarming zone.

Discussing food security issues facing the country, development economist Jean Dreze on Thursday called Bihar the hunger capital with one of the highest child malnutrition rates in the world. "The living condition of people in some of the Bihar villages is grimmer and horrifying than at most places in the world. In fact, in terms of scheme implementation, Bihar is the capital of corruption and exploitation in the world," said Dreze, adding that only some progress took place in the last few years.

With so much scale of problem it is difficult to know what to do, it is overwhelming.  The meal scheme we run is not free food donated randomly by strangers it is part of our overall health care programmes and the community give what they can, perhaps some wood for the fire and they make the stove from mud and cook the meal themselves, it is a community thing.

You can’t stop all the hunger in Bihar but by donating to this project you can ensure that all the children in these desperately poor villages receive the nutrition they need to grow and develop.  

As one mum told us,

“We enjoy the cooking all together for our children, this meal makes all the difference to their health, thank you so much for helping us in this way”

 

Neelam

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Child at Dadpur
Child at Dadpur

 

Hello Everybody,

I am Neelam , the senior nurse on the Health Project.

Dadpur is an isolated Dalit settlement surrounded by fields the villagers may work on but do not own. It is a million miles from the skyscrapers of the metros and the lights of the city.

Until People First opened the first village school the village was 90% illiterate, now much reduced and full literacy of those who have attended the school has of course already been achieved. The nearest government education, a primary school which suffers like so many schools in Bihar from a lack of teachers, is 8Km away.

But this report is about malnutrition, described by a recent prime minister as a “national shame’ and the programme you have kindly supported to give the children and weak of Dadpur, a hot nutritious meal full of the proteins and some oil which is deficient in their usual diet of rice with sometimes a few vegetables.  A nation, where 43 per cent of population thrives on a purely vegetarian diet, pulses (Dal) is the only source of protein.

But the price of dal at up to 100 rupees a kilo, 1 GBP or 1.50 USD is half a day’s pay for a labourer, that’s 28 GBP or $40 compared against minimum wage rates in the UK. This price puts it way beyond the means of nearly all the villagers except in very small amounts. By contrast the meal we give is composed mainly of dal, with eggs, spicy mashed potatoes, and papad. It is delicious and cooked by the villagers themselves – it’s a community thing.

A foreigner visiting the project remarked in London this could easily be sold at 15 GBP/$22 a plate!  

The meal comes as part of our whole health programme in the village which includes Nurse Clinics, health groups and discussions and help with a range of health issues from good birth practices, to hygiene, and sexual health.

As nurse for the project I can tell without any doubt this meal really helps the children of Dadpur develop within normal and healthy parameters and on behalf of all of the villagers I thank you for your support.

Please look at these new pictures taken  at Dadpur just a few days ago, 

With Kind Regards,

Neelam

child with baby
child with baby
meal at dadpur
meal at dadpur

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Mother and Child
Mother and Child

Hi 

I am Neelam Health Project Nurse with the latest project update.

I thought you might like to know how this project works. You have read in previous updates  about the huge problem in India of malnourished children and Bihar has more than its share of stunted and hungry children.

It is amazing what a nutritious meal full of goodness can do to promote child health. From our own records we have eliminated malnutrition in the village with children for the first time ever growing at normal levels.

But the community themselves cook and prepare the food, they know that sometimes mothers will starve themselves making sure the children get their food first so in such cases they help ensure the mothers get some food also , they are looking out for each other.

Here’s what Maya, a village woman says,

The meals brings us together in a positive way, we work together to prepare the best food for our children and other vulnerable villagers . Our village is poor we are all from the caste they call mussahars “rat eaters” Life is a struggle but it is a relief to know that this meal will help keep our children healthy and well. This is a wonderful thing”

It is a paradox that when you  think of the development of India in recent times that none of it has reached these villages in Bihar . None of it.

This is from the Times of India newspaper,

PATNA: Eighty-seven per cent of the rural population and 61% of urban residents in Bihar had calorie deficiency during 2013-14, as per reports of National Sample Survey Office. In fact, Bihar ranked 74th (alarming zone) in the global hunger index of 88 countries, according to a Survey of India State Hunger Index 2008.

The problem is very serious and I want to thank for your help in making sure that in at least in one at least one village in Bihar children will grow up with normal growth rates..

May I wish you all the best for the festive season

Neelam

Child in Village
Child in Village

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Village Girl
Village Girl

I am medical consultant for the Health Project and if you do not mind I would like to tell you about India’s hunger problem, and what a wonderful effect on one village this programme has, and what it means to the community.

NDIA has been growing steadily richer in recent years, but it still has more malnourished people, especially children, than any other country. A big, nationwide study from 2012 and 2013, the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), found that 42.5% of children under five years old were underweight. The region with the next highest proportion of underweight children is Africa, with an average of 21%. Another measure of malnutrition is stunting, when children are unusually short for their age. Again, India's problems were shown to be unusually bad.

The World Bank estimates that India is one of the highest ranking countries in the world for the number of children suffering from malnutrition. The prevalence of underweight children in India is among the highest in the world, and is nearly double that of Sub Saharan Africa with dire consequences for mobility, mortality, productivity and economic growth.

The 2011 Global Hunger Index (GHI) Report ranked India 15th, amongst leading countries with hunger situation. It also places India amongst the three countries where the GHI between 1996 and 2011 went up from 22.9 to 23.7, while 78 out of the 81 developing countries studied, including Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Kenya, Nigeria, Myanmar, Uganda, Zimbabwe and Malawi, succeeded in improving hunger condition. India is one of the fastest growing countries in terms of population and economics, sitting at a population of 1.2 billion and growing at 1.5%–1.7% annually (from 2001–2007). India's Gross Domestic Product growth was 9.0% from 2007 to 2008; since Independence in 1947, its economic status has been classified as a low-income country with majority of the population at or below the poverty line.

One of the major causes for malnutrition in India is gender inequality. Due to the low social status of Indian women, their diet often lacks in both quality and quantity. Women who suffer malnutrition are less likely to have healthy babies. In India, mothers generally lack proper knowledge in feeding children. Consequently, new born infants are unable to get adequate amount of nutrition from their mothers. The Health Project works with local women and health volunteers to make this situation much better in the projet area   

Subodh Varma, writing in The Times of India, states that on the Global Hunger Index India is on place 67 among the 80 nations having the worst hunger situation which is worse than nations such as North Korea or Sudan. 25% of all hungry people worldwide live in India. Since 1990 there has been some improvements for children but the proportion of hungry in the population has increased.

Whilst this problem is overwhelming, for the children of Dadpur  at least it is amazing how the protein rich healthy food this programme provides makes such a difference. Malnutrition has been greatly reduced in the village and for those who need extra help the project is providing supplements to those children most in need, as medical consultant for the project I can confirm and tell you all just how much your support means for all of the children , young mothers and the elderly in this community .

Thank you for your Support,

Dr Verma MBBS

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Organization Information

People First Educational Charitable Trust

Location: Bodhgaya, Bihar - India
Website:
Project Leader:
Deepak Kumar
Bodhgaya, Gaya, Bihar India

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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